Limits...
Taking stock and looking ahead: Behavioural science lessons for implementing the nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

Forster AS, Waller J - Eur. J. Cancer (2016)

Bottom Line: This commentary draws on the findings of over a decade of behavioural science research seeking to understand uptake of first generation HPV vaccines, in order to anticipate challenges to implement the nonavalent HPV vaccine.Challenges include distrust of combination vaccines, uncertainty about long-term efficacy, distrust of a new and (perceived to be) untested vaccine, cost and uncertainty regarding interchanging doses of first generation and nonavalent vaccines and the appropriateness of revaccination.We use behavioural science theory and existing evaluations of interventions to increase uptake of vaccines to identify evidence-based approaches that can be implemented by vaccine stakeholders to address parents' concerns and maximise uptake of the nonavalent HPV vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: alice.forster@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Health belief model.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920641&req=5

fig4: Health belief model.

Mentions: The behavioural scientist's toolkit includes a number of theories that have informed research seeking to understand the psychosocial factors influencing HPV vaccine receipt, as well as to identify targets for interventions to increase uptake. Two key theories have been used often in this field: the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) [26] and the health belief model (HBM) [27] (Fig. 3, Fig. 4). The TPB suggests that behaviour is directly informed by behavioural intentions and an individual’s perceived behavioural control (PBC, whether they believe they have control over performing the behaviour). Behavioural intentions are influenced by a person's attitudes, subjective norms (beliefs about what others would want them to do and their motivation to comply with this), as well as their PBC. The HBM suggests that six constructs influence whether a behaviour will be performed: perceived susceptibility and severity of the illness being prevented, perceived benefits and barriers to engaging in the recommended preventive behaviour, self-efficacy (akin to PBC) and cues to action (triggers that prompt behaviour). Given that many of the challenges discussed relate to the perceived costs and benefits of the nonavalent vaccine (HBM) and individuals' attitudes towards it (TPB), vaccine stakeholders seeking to increase uptake of the nonavalent vaccine may wish to consider intervening to change constructs of the HBM and TPB as these theories have been shown as a whole to predict vaccination behaviour [12]. Additional motivators to vaccination may be considered as targets, for example, although smoking status is associated with HPV positivity, to our knowledge, interventions to increase uptake of HPV vaccination have not been directed specifically at individuals who smoke.


Taking stock and looking ahead: Behavioural science lessons for implementing the nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

Forster AS, Waller J - Eur. J. Cancer (2016)

Health belief model.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920641&req=5

fig4: Health belief model.
Mentions: The behavioural scientist's toolkit includes a number of theories that have informed research seeking to understand the psychosocial factors influencing HPV vaccine receipt, as well as to identify targets for interventions to increase uptake. Two key theories have been used often in this field: the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) [26] and the health belief model (HBM) [27] (Fig. 3, Fig. 4). The TPB suggests that behaviour is directly informed by behavioural intentions and an individual’s perceived behavioural control (PBC, whether they believe they have control over performing the behaviour). Behavioural intentions are influenced by a person's attitudes, subjective norms (beliefs about what others would want them to do and their motivation to comply with this), as well as their PBC. The HBM suggests that six constructs influence whether a behaviour will be performed: perceived susceptibility and severity of the illness being prevented, perceived benefits and barriers to engaging in the recommended preventive behaviour, self-efficacy (akin to PBC) and cues to action (triggers that prompt behaviour). Given that many of the challenges discussed relate to the perceived costs and benefits of the nonavalent vaccine (HBM) and individuals' attitudes towards it (TPB), vaccine stakeholders seeking to increase uptake of the nonavalent vaccine may wish to consider intervening to change constructs of the HBM and TPB as these theories have been shown as a whole to predict vaccination behaviour [12]. Additional motivators to vaccination may be considered as targets, for example, although smoking status is associated with HPV positivity, to our knowledge, interventions to increase uptake of HPV vaccination have not been directed specifically at individuals who smoke.

Bottom Line: This commentary draws on the findings of over a decade of behavioural science research seeking to understand uptake of first generation HPV vaccines, in order to anticipate challenges to implement the nonavalent HPV vaccine.Challenges include distrust of combination vaccines, uncertainty about long-term efficacy, distrust of a new and (perceived to be) untested vaccine, cost and uncertainty regarding interchanging doses of first generation and nonavalent vaccines and the appropriateness of revaccination.We use behavioural science theory and existing evaluations of interventions to increase uptake of vaccines to identify evidence-based approaches that can be implemented by vaccine stakeholders to address parents' concerns and maximise uptake of the nonavalent HPV vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: alice.forster@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus