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Taking stock and looking ahead: Behavioural science lessons for implementing the nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

Forster AS, Waller J - Eur. J. Cancer (2016)

Bottom Line: This commentary draws on the findings of over a decade of behavioural science research seeking to understand uptake of first generation HPV vaccines, in order to anticipate challenges to implement the nonavalent HPV vaccine.Challenges include distrust of combination vaccines, uncertainty about long-term efficacy, distrust of a new and (perceived to be) untested vaccine, cost and uncertainty regarding interchanging doses of first generation and nonavalent vaccines and the appropriateness of revaccination.We use behavioural science theory and existing evaluations of interventions to increase uptake of vaccines to identify evidence-based approaches that can be implemented by vaccine stakeholders to address parents' concerns and maximise uptake of the nonavalent HPV vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: alice.forster@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Female uptake and program delivery method of selected countries.ahttps://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/487514/HPV_2014_15_ReportFinal181215_v1.1.pdf.bhttp://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6429a3.htm#tab1.chttp://www.hpvregister.org.au/research/coverage-data/HPV-Vaccination-Coverage-2014.dhttps://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/VaccinePreventable/Vaccination/ImmunisationUptakeStatistics/HPVImmunisationUptakeStatistics/File,15198,en.pdf.ehttp://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/hpv-immunisation-programme.fhttp://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/90/8/11-097253/en/.ghttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X15007513.
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fig1: Female uptake and program delivery method of selected countries.ahttps://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/487514/HPV_2014_15_ReportFinal181215_v1.1.pdf.bhttp://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6429a3.htm#tab1.chttp://www.hpvregister.org.au/research/coverage-data/HPV-Vaccination-Coverage-2014.dhttps://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/VaccinePreventable/Vaccination/ImmunisationUptakeStatistics/HPVImmunisationUptakeStatistics/File,15198,en.pdf.ehttp://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/hpv-immunisation-programme.fhttp://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/90/8/11-097253/en/.ghttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X15007513.

Mentions: While the development of vaccines against HPV represents a tremendous scientific advance, the promise of reduced incidence of HPV-related cancers can only be realised if the offer of vaccination is accepted. However, uptake is sub-optimal in most countries and shows wide global variation. With few exceptions [9], it tends to be highest in countries with school-based programs; for example, in Australia, uptake was 73% for girls turning 15 in 2014 [10]. By contrast, countries using clinic-based delivery often have lower uptake, exemplified by the USA where only around 40% of 13- to 17-year-old girls completed the series in 2014 [11] (see Fig. 1). It is striking that, with the exception of countries in South America, countries with organised HPV vaccination programs and good coverage tend to be those where the burden of disease is already low. In sub-Saharan Africa where the need is greatest, vaccination is generally not available, despite the on-going efforts of ‘Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance’. However, in this review, we focus on maximising uptake in countries where the vaccine is offered.


Taking stock and looking ahead: Behavioural science lessons for implementing the nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

Forster AS, Waller J - Eur. J. Cancer (2016)

Female uptake and program delivery method of selected countries.ahttps://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/487514/HPV_2014_15_ReportFinal181215_v1.1.pdf.bhttp://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6429a3.htm#tab1.chttp://www.hpvregister.org.au/research/coverage-data/HPV-Vaccination-Coverage-2014.dhttps://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/VaccinePreventable/Vaccination/ImmunisationUptakeStatistics/HPVImmunisationUptakeStatistics/File,15198,en.pdf.ehttp://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/hpv-immunisation-programme.fhttp://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/90/8/11-097253/en/.ghttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X15007513.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920641&req=5

fig1: Female uptake and program delivery method of selected countries.ahttps://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/487514/HPV_2014_15_ReportFinal181215_v1.1.pdf.bhttp://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6429a3.htm#tab1.chttp://www.hpvregister.org.au/research/coverage-data/HPV-Vaccination-Coverage-2014.dhttps://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/VaccinePreventable/Vaccination/ImmunisationUptakeStatistics/HPVImmunisationUptakeStatistics/File,15198,en.pdf.ehttp://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/hpv-immunisation-programme.fhttp://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/90/8/11-097253/en/.ghttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X15007513.
Mentions: While the development of vaccines against HPV represents a tremendous scientific advance, the promise of reduced incidence of HPV-related cancers can only be realised if the offer of vaccination is accepted. However, uptake is sub-optimal in most countries and shows wide global variation. With few exceptions [9], it tends to be highest in countries with school-based programs; for example, in Australia, uptake was 73% for girls turning 15 in 2014 [10]. By contrast, countries using clinic-based delivery often have lower uptake, exemplified by the USA where only around 40% of 13- to 17-year-old girls completed the series in 2014 [11] (see Fig. 1). It is striking that, with the exception of countries in South America, countries with organised HPV vaccination programs and good coverage tend to be those where the burden of disease is already low. In sub-Saharan Africa where the need is greatest, vaccination is generally not available, despite the on-going efforts of ‘Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance’. However, in this review, we focus on maximising uptake in countries where the vaccine is offered.

Bottom Line: This commentary draws on the findings of over a decade of behavioural science research seeking to understand uptake of first generation HPV vaccines, in order to anticipate challenges to implement the nonavalent HPV vaccine.Challenges include distrust of combination vaccines, uncertainty about long-term efficacy, distrust of a new and (perceived to be) untested vaccine, cost and uncertainty regarding interchanging doses of first generation and nonavalent vaccines and the appropriateness of revaccination.We use behavioural science theory and existing evaluations of interventions to increase uptake of vaccines to identify evidence-based approaches that can be implemented by vaccine stakeholders to address parents' concerns and maximise uptake of the nonavalent HPV vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: alice.forster@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus