Limits...
Specific Metabolic Markers Are Associated with Future Waist-Gaining Phenotype in Women.

Merz B, Nöthlings U, Wahl S, Haftenberger M, Schienkiewitz A, Adamski J, Suhre K, Wang-Sattler R, Grallert H, Thorand B, Pischon T, Bachlechner U, Floegel A, Peters A, Boeing H - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: Sex-specific associations with metabolite concentration as independent and phenotype as the dependent variable adjusted for confounders were calculated.We could identify 12 metabolites as being associated with the WG (n = 8) or HG (n = 4) in men, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing; 45 metabolites were associated with the WG (n = 41) or HG (n = 4) in women.For WG, n = 21 metabolites remained significant after correction for multiple testing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Our study aims to identify metabolic markers associated with either a gain in abdominal (measured by waist circumference) or peripheral (measured by hip circumference) body fat mass.

Methods: Data of 4 126 weight-gaining adults (18-75 years) from three population-based, prospective German cohort studies (EPIC, KORA, DEGS) were analysed regarding a waist-gaining (WG) or hip-gaining phenotype (HG). The phenotypes were obtained by calculating the differences of annual changes in waist minus hip circumference. The difference was displayed for all cohorts. The highest 10% of this difference were defined as WG whereas the lowest 10% were defined as HG. A total of 121 concordant metabolite measurements were conducted using Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ® kits in EPIC and KORA. Sex-specific associations with metabolite concentration as independent and phenotype as the dependent variable adjusted for confounders were calculated. The Benjamini-Hochberg method was used to correct for multiple testing.

Results: Across studies both sexes gained on average more waist than hip circumference. We could identify 12 metabolites as being associated with the WG (n = 8) or HG (n = 4) in men, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing; 45 metabolites were associated with the WG (n = 41) or HG (n = 4) in women. For WG, n = 21 metabolites remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Respective odds ratios (OR) ranged from 0.66 to 0.73 for tryptophan, the diacyl-phosphatidylcholines (PC) C32:3, C36:0, C38:0, C38:1, C42:2, C42:5, the acyl-alkyl-PCs C32:2, C34:0, C36:0, C36:1, C36:2, C38:0, C38:2, C40:1, C40:2, C40:5, C40:6, 42:2, C42:3 and lyso-PC C17:0.

Conclusion: Both weight-gaining men and women showed a clear tendency to gain more abdominal than peripheral fat. Gain of abdominal fat seems to be related to an initial metabolic state reflected by low concentrations of specific metabolites, at least in women. Thus, higher levels of specific PCs may play a protective role in gaining waist circumference.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Metabolites showing significant associations with WG phenotype in women after correction for multiple testing.EPIC, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Potsdam Study; KORA, Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg Study; PC, phosphatidylcholines; a, acyl; e, alkyl; SM, sphingomyelin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920591&req=5

pone.0157733.g002: Metabolites showing significant associations with WG phenotype in women after correction for multiple testing.EPIC, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Potsdam Study; KORA, Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg Study; PC, phosphatidylcholines; a, acyl; e, alkyl; SM, sphingomyelin.

Mentions: When we applied the Benjamini-Hochberg method to correct for multiple testing, we identified AA tryptophan, diacyl-PCs C32:3, C36:0, C38:0, C38:1, C42:2, C42:5, acyl-alkyl-PCs C32:2, C34:0, C36:0, C36:1, C36:2, C38:0, C38:2, C40:1, C40:2, C40:5, C40:6, C42:2, C42:3 and lyso-PC C17:0 to be predictive for WG in women (Fig 2). With increasing concentration, each of these metabolites showed inverse associations. All significant associations are within a range of OR 0.66–0.73 (pFDR 0.0181–0.0474), i.e. if the metabolite concentration of selected metabolites increases per one SD the chance of having the WG decreases between 27% and 34%. The lowest odds ratios were observed for acyl-alkyl-PCs C40:6 (OR: 0.66, 95%-CI: 0.52–0.82, pFDR = 0.0181) and C42:3 (OR: 0.67, 95%-CI: 0.53–0.83, pFDR = 0.0181). When comparing results of significant metabolites in women for WG and HG, 17 showed contrasting associations, 4 metabolites had the same direction but much weaker strength of association (Trp, diacyl-PC C42:5, acyl-alkyl-PC C40:1 and C42:2). Complete lists of associations linking both phenotypes with baseline metabolite concentrations are reported in S3–S6 Tables. After multiple testing corrections, associations with WG in women remained significant. In addition, of all the PCs—including those without significant association with WG—the majority showed suggestive negative associations.


Specific Metabolic Markers Are Associated with Future Waist-Gaining Phenotype in Women.

Merz B, Nöthlings U, Wahl S, Haftenberger M, Schienkiewitz A, Adamski J, Suhre K, Wang-Sattler R, Grallert H, Thorand B, Pischon T, Bachlechner U, Floegel A, Peters A, Boeing H - PLoS ONE (2016)

Metabolites showing significant associations with WG phenotype in women after correction for multiple testing.EPIC, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Potsdam Study; KORA, Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg Study; PC, phosphatidylcholines; a, acyl; e, alkyl; SM, sphingomyelin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920591&req=5

pone.0157733.g002: Metabolites showing significant associations with WG phenotype in women after correction for multiple testing.EPIC, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Potsdam Study; KORA, Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg Study; PC, phosphatidylcholines; a, acyl; e, alkyl; SM, sphingomyelin.
Mentions: When we applied the Benjamini-Hochberg method to correct for multiple testing, we identified AA tryptophan, diacyl-PCs C32:3, C36:0, C38:0, C38:1, C42:2, C42:5, acyl-alkyl-PCs C32:2, C34:0, C36:0, C36:1, C36:2, C38:0, C38:2, C40:1, C40:2, C40:5, C40:6, C42:2, C42:3 and lyso-PC C17:0 to be predictive for WG in women (Fig 2). With increasing concentration, each of these metabolites showed inverse associations. All significant associations are within a range of OR 0.66–0.73 (pFDR 0.0181–0.0474), i.e. if the metabolite concentration of selected metabolites increases per one SD the chance of having the WG decreases between 27% and 34%. The lowest odds ratios were observed for acyl-alkyl-PCs C40:6 (OR: 0.66, 95%-CI: 0.52–0.82, pFDR = 0.0181) and C42:3 (OR: 0.67, 95%-CI: 0.53–0.83, pFDR = 0.0181). When comparing results of significant metabolites in women for WG and HG, 17 showed contrasting associations, 4 metabolites had the same direction but much weaker strength of association (Trp, diacyl-PC C42:5, acyl-alkyl-PC C40:1 and C42:2). Complete lists of associations linking both phenotypes with baseline metabolite concentrations are reported in S3–S6 Tables. After multiple testing corrections, associations with WG in women remained significant. In addition, of all the PCs—including those without significant association with WG—the majority showed suggestive negative associations.

Bottom Line: Sex-specific associations with metabolite concentration as independent and phenotype as the dependent variable adjusted for confounders were calculated.We could identify 12 metabolites as being associated with the WG (n = 8) or HG (n = 4) in men, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing; 45 metabolites were associated with the WG (n = 41) or HG (n = 4) in women.For WG, n = 21 metabolites remained significant after correction for multiple testing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Our study aims to identify metabolic markers associated with either a gain in abdominal (measured by waist circumference) or peripheral (measured by hip circumference) body fat mass.

Methods: Data of 4 126 weight-gaining adults (18-75 years) from three population-based, prospective German cohort studies (EPIC, KORA, DEGS) were analysed regarding a waist-gaining (WG) or hip-gaining phenotype (HG). The phenotypes were obtained by calculating the differences of annual changes in waist minus hip circumference. The difference was displayed for all cohorts. The highest 10% of this difference were defined as WG whereas the lowest 10% were defined as HG. A total of 121 concordant metabolite measurements were conducted using Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ® kits in EPIC and KORA. Sex-specific associations with metabolite concentration as independent and phenotype as the dependent variable adjusted for confounders were calculated. The Benjamini-Hochberg method was used to correct for multiple testing.

Results: Across studies both sexes gained on average more waist than hip circumference. We could identify 12 metabolites as being associated with the WG (n = 8) or HG (n = 4) in men, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing; 45 metabolites were associated with the WG (n = 41) or HG (n = 4) in women. For WG, n = 21 metabolites remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Respective odds ratios (OR) ranged from 0.66 to 0.73 for tryptophan, the diacyl-phosphatidylcholines (PC) C32:3, C36:0, C38:0, C38:1, C42:2, C42:5, the acyl-alkyl-PCs C32:2, C34:0, C36:0, C36:1, C36:2, C38:0, C38:2, C40:1, C40:2, C40:5, C40:6, 42:2, C42:3 and lyso-PC C17:0.

Conclusion: Both weight-gaining men and women showed a clear tendency to gain more abdominal than peripheral fat. Gain of abdominal fat seems to be related to an initial metabolic state reflected by low concentrations of specific metabolites, at least in women. Thus, higher levels of specific PCs may play a protective role in gaining waist circumference.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus