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Following a Physician ’ s Footsteps in Flanders: The Centenary of the Somme

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There were 7 motor ambulances attached to each Field Ambulance – those belonging to the 36 Division were a particular source of pride as they were funded by various towns in Ulster whose names were inscribed on the coachwork... Each ambulance could hold 12 seated or 4 lying casualties! The difficulty for the wounded soldier was, of course, getting from No-man’s land back to effective help... The first link in the chain was the Regimental Aid Post, manned by the Regimental Medical Officer (RMO) and some stretcher bearers... The Ulster Division went over the top just before 0730 hrs on the 1 July 1916 and despite suffering enormous casualties overcoming intact barbed wire and German defenses, achieved its objectives and occupied the German trenches... Eventually, they had to pull back with further loss of life... Out of an effective strength of about 10000 or so, there were 5104 casualties on the 1 July with 2069 deaths... The RMO at the Regimental Aid Post of the 109 Brigade was 24-year old Dr Frank Percivale Montgomery from Lower Crescent in South Belfast... During the initial bombardment and the first few days of the battle, he retrieved many wounded men from the front lines and No-man’s land whilst under fire (RMOs had a high attrition rate) and was awarded the Military Cross... What I didn’t appreciate medically was the long route taken by so many of the wounded before receiving life-saving interventions... So what progress has Ulster made in 100 years? Very shortly, we will be recruiting young men and women to staff our own Air Ambulance that will potentially bring life-saving interventions to those who need it or evacuate them quickly to a base hospital... I’m sure Frank Montgomery would approve.

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A soldier has his wounds dressed. Image credit: The Somme Association.
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Figure 0001: A soldier has his wounds dressed. Image credit: The Somme Association.

Mentions: The first link in the chain was the Regimental Aid Post, manned by the Regimental Medical Officer (RMO) and some stretcher bearers. This was usually sited in the 3rd trench behind the front line. The wounded either walked there or were carried by comrades. Wounds would be dressed and a drink of water and cigarette offered! (Figure 1)1, 2


Following a Physician ’ s Footsteps in Flanders: The Centenary of the Somme
A soldier has his wounds dressed. Image credit: The Somme Association.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920495&req=5

Figure 0001: A soldier has his wounds dressed. Image credit: The Somme Association.
Mentions: The first link in the chain was the Regimental Aid Post, manned by the Regimental Medical Officer (RMO) and some stretcher bearers. This was usually sited in the 3rd trench behind the front line. The wounded either walked there or were carried by comrades. Wounds would be dressed and a drink of water and cigarette offered! (Figure 1)1, 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

There were 7 motor ambulances attached to each Field Ambulance – those belonging to the 36 Division were a particular source of pride as they were funded by various towns in Ulster whose names were inscribed on the coachwork... Each ambulance could hold 12 seated or 4 lying casualties! The difficulty for the wounded soldier was, of course, getting from No-man’s land back to effective help... The first link in the chain was the Regimental Aid Post, manned by the Regimental Medical Officer (RMO) and some stretcher bearers... The Ulster Division went over the top just before 0730 hrs on the 1 July 1916 and despite suffering enormous casualties overcoming intact barbed wire and German defenses, achieved its objectives and occupied the German trenches... Eventually, they had to pull back with further loss of life... Out of an effective strength of about 10000 or so, there were 5104 casualties on the 1 July with 2069 deaths... The RMO at the Regimental Aid Post of the 109 Brigade was 24-year old Dr Frank Percivale Montgomery from Lower Crescent in South Belfast... During the initial bombardment and the first few days of the battle, he retrieved many wounded men from the front lines and No-man’s land whilst under fire (RMOs had a high attrition rate) and was awarded the Military Cross... What I didn’t appreciate medically was the long route taken by so many of the wounded before receiving life-saving interventions... So what progress has Ulster made in 100 years? Very shortly, we will be recruiting young men and women to staff our own Air Ambulance that will potentially bring life-saving interventions to those who need it or evacuate them quickly to a base hospital... I’m sure Frank Montgomery would approve.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus