Limits...
Correlation between periodontal disease management and metabolic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A systematic literature review.

Pérez-Losada FL, Jané-Salas E, Sabater-Recolons MM, Estrugo-Devesa A, Segura-Egea JJ, López-López J - Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal (2016)

Bottom Line: In the six remaining articles (representing 914 patients, 47.8% of the total), the decrease in HbA1c was not significant.Patient follow-up varied between 3 to 12 months.In three articles, the follow-up was of 3, 4, and 9 months, in two 6 and 12 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Odontostomatology, School of Dentistry, Pabellón de Gobierno, Bellvitge University Campus, C/Feixa LLarga s/n, 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain, 18575jll@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes and periodontal disease share common features in terms of inflammatory responses. Current scientific evidence suggests that treatment of periodontal disease might contribute to glycemic control. The objective of the study is a review of the last three years.

Material and methods: A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane, and Scopus databases, for articles published between 01-01-2013 and 30-06-2015, applying the key terms "periodontal disease" AND "diabetes mellitus". The review analyzed clinical trials of humans published in English and Spanish.

Results: Thirteen clinical trials were reviewed, representing a total of 1,912 patients. Three of them had samples of <40 patients, making a total of 108 patients and the remaining ten samples had >40 patients, representing a total of 1,804. Only one article achieved a Jadad score of five. Seven articles (998 patients, 52.3% total), presented a statistically significant decrease in HbA1c (p<0.05) as a result of periodontal treatment. In the six remaining articles (representing 914 patients, 47.8% of the total), the decrease in HbA1c was not significant. Patient follow-up varied between 3 to 12 months. In three articles, the follow-up was of 3, 4, and 9 months, in two 6 and 12 months.

Conclusions: The majority of clinical trials showed that radicular curettage and smoothing, whether associated with antibiotics or not, can improve periodontal conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, few studies suggest that this periodontal treatment improves metabolic control. However, there is no clear evidence of a relation between periodontal treatment and improved glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of selection process.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920457&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram of selection process.

Mentions: The initial search in the Medline database identified 377 articles of which 30 clinical trials in humans were selected. After applying the inclusion criteria this number reduced to nine (26-34). Searches in other databases (Cochrane and Scopus) obtained a total of 127 articles; when repetitions had been excluded and inclusion criteria applied, a further four articles (35-38) were added, making a total of 13 (Fig. 1) ( Table 1 and Table 1continue).


Correlation between periodontal disease management and metabolic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A systematic literature review.

Pérez-Losada FL, Jané-Salas E, Sabater-Recolons MM, Estrugo-Devesa A, Segura-Egea JJ, López-López J - Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal (2016)

Flow diagram of selection process.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920457&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram of selection process.
Mentions: The initial search in the Medline database identified 377 articles of which 30 clinical trials in humans were selected. After applying the inclusion criteria this number reduced to nine (26-34). Searches in other databases (Cochrane and Scopus) obtained a total of 127 articles; when repetitions had been excluded and inclusion criteria applied, a further four articles (35-38) were added, making a total of 13 (Fig. 1) ( Table 1 and Table 1continue).

Bottom Line: In the six remaining articles (representing 914 patients, 47.8% of the total), the decrease in HbA1c was not significant.Patient follow-up varied between 3 to 12 months.In three articles, the follow-up was of 3, 4, and 9 months, in two 6 and 12 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Odontostomatology, School of Dentistry, Pabellón de Gobierno, Bellvitge University Campus, C/Feixa LLarga s/n, 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain, 18575jll@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes and periodontal disease share common features in terms of inflammatory responses. Current scientific evidence suggests that treatment of periodontal disease might contribute to glycemic control. The objective of the study is a review of the last three years.

Material and methods: A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane, and Scopus databases, for articles published between 01-01-2013 and 30-06-2015, applying the key terms "periodontal disease" AND "diabetes mellitus". The review analyzed clinical trials of humans published in English and Spanish.

Results: Thirteen clinical trials were reviewed, representing a total of 1,912 patients. Three of them had samples of <40 patients, making a total of 108 patients and the remaining ten samples had >40 patients, representing a total of 1,804. Only one article achieved a Jadad score of five. Seven articles (998 patients, 52.3% total), presented a statistically significant decrease in HbA1c (p<0.05) as a result of periodontal treatment. In the six remaining articles (representing 914 patients, 47.8% of the total), the decrease in HbA1c was not significant. Patient follow-up varied between 3 to 12 months. In three articles, the follow-up was of 3, 4, and 9 months, in two 6 and 12 months.

Conclusions: The majority of clinical trials showed that radicular curettage and smoothing, whether associated with antibiotics or not, can improve periodontal conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, few studies suggest that this periodontal treatment improves metabolic control. However, there is no clear evidence of a relation between periodontal treatment and improved glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus