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No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults.

Lippelt DP, van der Kint S, van Herk K, Naber M - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks.The hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics.We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, Leiden, 2333AK, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0-2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of visuospatial working memory task of experiment 1.Average percentage correctly memorized picture locations across participants (chance = ~11%) per supplementation condition (C = choline, P = placebo; n.s. = no significant difference).
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pone.0157714.g002: Results of visuospatial working memory task of experiment 1.Average percentage correctly memorized picture locations across participants (chance = ~11%) per supplementation condition (C = choline, P = placebo; n.s. = no significant difference).

Mentions: Our first aim was to examine whether choline bitartrate improved visuospatial memory performance an hour after ingestion. A t-test showed no significant difference between the choline supplementation and placebo session on the number of correctly memorized picture locations (Fig 2; t(27) = 0.28, p = 0.780; Choline: M = 66%, SD = 13%; Placebo: M = 66%, SD = 13%). As the effect of choline may have depended on the participants’ Body Mass Indices (BMI), we additionally calculated the correlation between performance differences between choline and placebo and BMI. However, BMI did not correlate with the effect of choline versus placebo on performance (r(26) = 0.03, p = 0.899). Furthermore, we found no effects of choline on HR, SBP, DBP, mood, and arousal (p’s > 0.05; see S1 Table). Results obtained from the Bayesian analysis strongly favor the -hypothesis that performance after choline supplementation is not better than after placebo supplementation (Choline > Placebo BF10: 0.164; BF01: 6.096). To summarize the results, choline bitartrate ingestion does not help healthy human participants to store and maintain locations of stimuli in working memory. In the following experiment we assessed whether declarative memories, probed through picture familiarity ratings, could be enhanced by choline bitartrate.


No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults.

Lippelt DP, van der Kint S, van Herk K, Naber M - PLoS ONE (2016)

Results of visuospatial working memory task of experiment 1.Average percentage correctly memorized picture locations across participants (chance = ~11%) per supplementation condition (C = choline, P = placebo; n.s. = no significant difference).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920398&req=5

pone.0157714.g002: Results of visuospatial working memory task of experiment 1.Average percentage correctly memorized picture locations across participants (chance = ~11%) per supplementation condition (C = choline, P = placebo; n.s. = no significant difference).
Mentions: Our first aim was to examine whether choline bitartrate improved visuospatial memory performance an hour after ingestion. A t-test showed no significant difference between the choline supplementation and placebo session on the number of correctly memorized picture locations (Fig 2; t(27) = 0.28, p = 0.780; Choline: M = 66%, SD = 13%; Placebo: M = 66%, SD = 13%). As the effect of choline may have depended on the participants’ Body Mass Indices (BMI), we additionally calculated the correlation between performance differences between choline and placebo and BMI. However, BMI did not correlate with the effect of choline versus placebo on performance (r(26) = 0.03, p = 0.899). Furthermore, we found no effects of choline on HR, SBP, DBP, mood, and arousal (p’s > 0.05; see S1 Table). Results obtained from the Bayesian analysis strongly favor the -hypothesis that performance after choline supplementation is not better than after placebo supplementation (Choline > Placebo BF10: 0.164; BF01: 6.096). To summarize the results, choline bitartrate ingestion does not help healthy human participants to store and maintain locations of stimuli in working memory. In the following experiment we assessed whether declarative memories, probed through picture familiarity ratings, could be enhanced by choline bitartrate.

Bottom Line: We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks.The hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics.We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, Leiden, 2333AK, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0-2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus