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Tectonic blocks and molecular clocks.

De Baets K, Antonelli A, Donoghue PC - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2016)

Bottom Line: However, tectonic episodes are protracted, their role in vicariance is rarely justified, the biogeography of living clades and their antecedents may differ, and the impact of such events is contingent on ecology.Biogeographic calibrations are no panacea for the shortcomings of fossil calibrations, but their associated uncertainties can be accommodated.Biogeographic and fossil calibrations are complementary, not competing, approaches to constraining molecular clock analyses, providing alternative constraints on the age of clades that are vital to avoiding circularity in investigating the role of biogeographic mechanisms in shaping modern biodiversity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Life Sciences Building, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Fachgruppe PaläoUmwelt, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Loewenichstr. 28, 91054 Erlangen, Germany kenneth.debaets@fau.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a–f) Different phases in the opening of the Atlantic Ocean (adapted from [29]) with possible links with divergences of terrestrial groups with different dispersal abilities. Note that just oceans and continents are drawn; these have no bearing on coastlines which are more land-inward and more difficult to reconstruct.
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RSTB20160098F4: (a–f) Different phases in the opening of the Atlantic Ocean (adapted from [29]) with possible links with divergences of terrestrial groups with different dispersal abilities. Note that just oceans and continents are drawn; these have no bearing on coastlines which are more land-inward and more difficult to reconstruct.

Mentions: Many terrestrial sibling lineages exhibit a pattern of distribution compatible with vicariant divergence caused by the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, as part of the fragmentation of Pangaea. Thus, the opening of the Atlantic is one of the widely employed biogeographic calibrations in divergence time estimation for plants [35,101,102], onychophora [80], insects [81,103,104] and amphibians [83,84,105]; by some it is also considered to be among the best-constrained temporally [106]. However, the opening of the Atlantic was a protracted process and the physical separation of the continents was not synchronous along the line of rifting, with seafloor spreading beginning in the Central Atlantic before propagating north from the southernmost Atlantic (figure 4), and finally, extending into the northernmost Atlantic [29]. The timing of different events (establishment of a rift valley, establishment of a seaway, start of seafloor spreading, etc.) within this tectonic episode remains contentious, not least since they draw upon many different sources of evidence from different geographical regions.Figure 4.


Tectonic blocks and molecular clocks.

De Baets K, Antonelli A, Donoghue PC - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2016)

(a–f) Different phases in the opening of the Atlantic Ocean (adapted from [29]) with possible links with divergences of terrestrial groups with different dispersal abilities. Note that just oceans and continents are drawn; these have no bearing on coastlines which are more land-inward and more difficult to reconstruct.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920344&req=5

RSTB20160098F4: (a–f) Different phases in the opening of the Atlantic Ocean (adapted from [29]) with possible links with divergences of terrestrial groups with different dispersal abilities. Note that just oceans and continents are drawn; these have no bearing on coastlines which are more land-inward and more difficult to reconstruct.
Mentions: Many terrestrial sibling lineages exhibit a pattern of distribution compatible with vicariant divergence caused by the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, as part of the fragmentation of Pangaea. Thus, the opening of the Atlantic is one of the widely employed biogeographic calibrations in divergence time estimation for plants [35,101,102], onychophora [80], insects [81,103,104] and amphibians [83,84,105]; by some it is also considered to be among the best-constrained temporally [106]. However, the opening of the Atlantic was a protracted process and the physical separation of the continents was not synchronous along the line of rifting, with seafloor spreading beginning in the Central Atlantic before propagating north from the southernmost Atlantic (figure 4), and finally, extending into the northernmost Atlantic [29]. The timing of different events (establishment of a rift valley, establishment of a seaway, start of seafloor spreading, etc.) within this tectonic episode remains contentious, not least since they draw upon many different sources of evidence from different geographical regions.Figure 4.

Bottom Line: However, tectonic episodes are protracted, their role in vicariance is rarely justified, the biogeography of living clades and their antecedents may differ, and the impact of such events is contingent on ecology.Biogeographic calibrations are no panacea for the shortcomings of fossil calibrations, but their associated uncertainties can be accommodated.Biogeographic and fossil calibrations are complementary, not competing, approaches to constraining molecular clock analyses, providing alternative constraints on the age of clades that are vital to avoiding circularity in investigating the role of biogeographic mechanisms in shaping modern biodiversity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Life Sciences Building, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Fachgruppe PaläoUmwelt, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Loewenichstr. 28, 91054 Erlangen, Germany kenneth.debaets@fau.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus