Limits...
The impact of coping on the somatic and mental status of patients with COPD: a cross-sectional study.

Papava I, Oancea C, Enatescu VR, Bredicean AC, Dehelean L, Romosan RS, Timar B - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2016)

Bottom Line: Regarding respiratory parameters, significant differences were present for the variation of the medians between the four groups only for forced vital capacity (FVC%) (the lowest FVC% was in patients with predominant social support-focused coping and the highest in patients with problem-focused coping) and 6-minute walking test (%) (the lowest score for patients with social support-focused coping and the highest value in patients with avoidance-type coping).Problem-coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.400; P=0.035), emotion-focused coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.395; P=0.038), and social support-focused coping score was negatively and significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/FVC% ratio (Spearman's r=0.389; P=0.041).A significant, negative correlation was found only between depression score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Spearman's r=-0.435; P=0.026) with respect to psychiatric symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosciences - Discipline of Psychiatry.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most debilitating somatic diseases, having anxiety and depression frequently as comorbidities. The coping style, the way in which the subject manages to control the difficult and stressful situations of life, can influence its evolution and also the existence of the comorbidities. In this study, coping styles in a group of subjects with COPD and their association with the intensity of depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as medical determinants were identified.

Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 28 male patients with COPD risk class D were enrolled. The patients performed spirometry tests, Borg scale, 6-minute walking test, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and COPE Inventory were recorded.

Results: According to their higher coping subscale score, the depression score was the highest in patients with avoidance-type coping and the lowest in patients with problem-focused coping (11.0 vs 5.6; P=0.042), respectively, patients with social support-focused coping having the highest anxiety score in contrast to patients with emotion-focused coping, which had the lowest anxiety score (11.6 vs 5.0; P=0.006). Regarding respiratory parameters, significant differences were present for the variation of the medians between the four groups only for forced vital capacity (FVC%) (the lowest FVC% was in patients with predominant social support-focused coping and the highest in patients with problem-focused coping) and 6-minute walking test (%) (the lowest score for patients with social support-focused coping and the highest value in patients with avoidance-type coping). Problem-coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.400; P=0.035), emotion-focused coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.395; P=0.038), and social support-focused coping score was negatively and significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/FVC% ratio (Spearman's r=0.389; P=0.041). A significant, negative correlation was found only between depression score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Spearman's r=-0.435; P=0.026) with respect to psychiatric symptoms.

Conclusion: Coping styles in patients with COPD affect the intensity of associated depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as medical determinants, thus the coping style should be considered an important part in the multidisciplinary approach of these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between social support-focused coping score and FEV1/FVC ratio.Abbreviations: FEV1, forced expiratory volume in 1 second; FVC, forced vital capacity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920257&req=5

f3-copd-11-1343: Correlation between social support-focused coping score and FEV1/FVC ratio.Abbreviations: FEV1, forced expiratory volume in 1 second; FVC, forced vital capacity.

Mentions: When the association between the four coping scales and the respiratory parameters were analyzed, different patterns of relationships were observed. Problem-focused coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman’s r=0.400; P=0.035; Figure 1). Emotion-focused coping score was positively and significantly associated with FVC% (Spearman’s r=0.395; P=0.038; Figure 2). Social support-focused coping score was negatively and significantly correlated with FEV1/FVC% ratio (Spearman’s r=0.389; P=0.041), which means that a more significant social support-focused coping type is associated with the lower values of this ratio (Figure 3). The other studied pairs of correlations had no statistical significance (Table 4). Regarding the association between anxiety or depression and respiratory parameters, a significant, negative correlation only between depression score and FEV1 (Spearman’s r=−0.435; P=0.026; Figure 4), denoting that patients with more advanced depression symptomatology have a decreased FEV1% value, was found in this study. The other pairs of studied variables were not significantly correlated (Table 5).


The impact of coping on the somatic and mental status of patients with COPD: a cross-sectional study.

Papava I, Oancea C, Enatescu VR, Bredicean AC, Dehelean L, Romosan RS, Timar B - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2016)

Correlation between social support-focused coping score and FEV1/FVC ratio.Abbreviations: FEV1, forced expiratory volume in 1 second; FVC, forced vital capacity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920257&req=5

f3-copd-11-1343: Correlation between social support-focused coping score and FEV1/FVC ratio.Abbreviations: FEV1, forced expiratory volume in 1 second; FVC, forced vital capacity.
Mentions: When the association between the four coping scales and the respiratory parameters were analyzed, different patterns of relationships were observed. Problem-focused coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman’s r=0.400; P=0.035; Figure 1). Emotion-focused coping score was positively and significantly associated with FVC% (Spearman’s r=0.395; P=0.038; Figure 2). Social support-focused coping score was negatively and significantly correlated with FEV1/FVC% ratio (Spearman’s r=0.389; P=0.041), which means that a more significant social support-focused coping type is associated with the lower values of this ratio (Figure 3). The other studied pairs of correlations had no statistical significance (Table 4). Regarding the association between anxiety or depression and respiratory parameters, a significant, negative correlation only between depression score and FEV1 (Spearman’s r=−0.435; P=0.026; Figure 4), denoting that patients with more advanced depression symptomatology have a decreased FEV1% value, was found in this study. The other pairs of studied variables were not significantly correlated (Table 5).

Bottom Line: Regarding respiratory parameters, significant differences were present for the variation of the medians between the four groups only for forced vital capacity (FVC%) (the lowest FVC% was in patients with predominant social support-focused coping and the highest in patients with problem-focused coping) and 6-minute walking test (%) (the lowest score for patients with social support-focused coping and the highest value in patients with avoidance-type coping).Problem-coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.400; P=0.035), emotion-focused coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.395; P=0.038), and social support-focused coping score was negatively and significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/FVC% ratio (Spearman's r=0.389; P=0.041).A significant, negative correlation was found only between depression score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Spearman's r=-0.435; P=0.026) with respect to psychiatric symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosciences - Discipline of Psychiatry.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most debilitating somatic diseases, having anxiety and depression frequently as comorbidities. The coping style, the way in which the subject manages to control the difficult and stressful situations of life, can influence its evolution and also the existence of the comorbidities. In this study, coping styles in a group of subjects with COPD and their association with the intensity of depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as medical determinants were identified.

Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 28 male patients with COPD risk class D were enrolled. The patients performed spirometry tests, Borg scale, 6-minute walking test, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and COPE Inventory were recorded.

Results: According to their higher coping subscale score, the depression score was the highest in patients with avoidance-type coping and the lowest in patients with problem-focused coping (11.0 vs 5.6; P=0.042), respectively, patients with social support-focused coping having the highest anxiety score in contrast to patients with emotion-focused coping, which had the lowest anxiety score (11.6 vs 5.0; P=0.006). Regarding respiratory parameters, significant differences were present for the variation of the medians between the four groups only for forced vital capacity (FVC%) (the lowest FVC% was in patients with predominant social support-focused coping and the highest in patients with problem-focused coping) and 6-minute walking test (%) (the lowest score for patients with social support-focused coping and the highest value in patients with avoidance-type coping). Problem-coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.400; P=0.035), emotion-focused coping score was significantly and positively associated with FVC% (Spearman's r=0.395; P=0.038), and social support-focused coping score was negatively and significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/FVC% ratio (Spearman's r=0.389; P=0.041). A significant, negative correlation was found only between depression score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Spearman's r=-0.435; P=0.026) with respect to psychiatric symptoms.

Conclusion: Coping styles in patients with COPD affect the intensity of associated depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as medical determinants, thus the coping style should be considered an important part in the multidisciplinary approach of these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus