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A comparison of patient pain and visual outcome using topical anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during cataract surgery.

Hosoda Y, Kuriyama S, Jingami Y, Hattori H, Hayashi H, Matsumoto M - Clin Ophthalmol (2016)

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups.No additional anesthesia was required in all groups.Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Otsu Red-Cross Hospital, Otsu, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the level of patient pain during the phacoemulsification and implantation of foldable intraocular lenses while under topical, intracameral, or sub-Tenon lidocaine.

Patients and methods: This was a retrospective study. Three hundred and one eyes subjected to cataract surgery were included in this study. All eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery and intraocular lens implantation using topical, sub-Tenon, or intracameral anesthesia. The topical group received 4% lidocaine drops, and the intracameral group received a 0.1-0.2 cc infusion of 1% preservative-free lidocaine into the anterior chamber through the side port combined with topical drops of lidocaine. The sub-Tenon group received 2% lidocaine. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal endothelial cell loss, and intraoperative pain level were evaluated. Pain level was assessed on a visual analog scale (range 0-2).

Results: There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups. The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0009 and P=0.0055, respectively). In 250 eyes without high myopia (< -6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). No additional anesthesia was required in all groups.

Conclusion: Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The mean pain scores during cataract surgery in patients with and without high myopia.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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f1-opth-10-1139: The mean pain scores during cataract surgery in patients with and without high myopia.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the average of pain scores in patients with and without high myopia. Fifty-one eyes in 30 patients showed high myopia (> −6D). In 51 myopic eyes, there were no significant differences in age, duration of surgery, visual acuity, and mean percentage of corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups (topical, sub-Tenon, and intracameral). The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0031 and P=0.0020, respectively). However, in 250 eyes without high myopia (< −6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics and visual outcome between the three groups.


A comparison of patient pain and visual outcome using topical anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during cataract surgery.

Hosoda Y, Kuriyama S, Jingami Y, Hattori H, Hayashi H, Matsumoto M - Clin Ophthalmol (2016)

The mean pain scores during cataract surgery in patients with and without high myopia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920242&req=5

f1-opth-10-1139: The mean pain scores during cataract surgery in patients with and without high myopia.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the average of pain scores in patients with and without high myopia. Fifty-one eyes in 30 patients showed high myopia (> −6D). In 51 myopic eyes, there were no significant differences in age, duration of surgery, visual acuity, and mean percentage of corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups (topical, sub-Tenon, and intracameral). The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0031 and P=0.0020, respectively). However, in 250 eyes without high myopia (< −6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics and visual outcome between the three groups.

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups.No additional anesthesia was required in all groups.Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Otsu Red-Cross Hospital, Otsu, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the level of patient pain during the phacoemulsification and implantation of foldable intraocular lenses while under topical, intracameral, or sub-Tenon lidocaine.

Patients and methods: This was a retrospective study. Three hundred and one eyes subjected to cataract surgery were included in this study. All eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery and intraocular lens implantation using topical, sub-Tenon, or intracameral anesthesia. The topical group received 4% lidocaine drops, and the intracameral group received a 0.1-0.2 cc infusion of 1% preservative-free lidocaine into the anterior chamber through the side port combined with topical drops of lidocaine. The sub-Tenon group received 2% lidocaine. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal endothelial cell loss, and intraoperative pain level were evaluated. Pain level was assessed on a visual analog scale (range 0-2).

Results: There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups. The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0009 and P=0.0055, respectively). In 250 eyes without high myopia (< -6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). No additional anesthesia was required in all groups.

Conclusion: Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus