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Body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous insect species, Gryllus bimaculatus.

Miyashita A, Kizaki H, Sekimizu K, Kaito C - Biol Open (2016)

Bottom Line: Honeybee royal jelly is reported to have body-enlarging effects in holometabolous insects such as the honeybee, fly and silkmoth, but its effect in non-holometabolous insect species has not yet been examined.We further examined the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous species, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which belongs to the evolutionarily primitive group Polyneoptera.These findings suggest that the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is common in non-holometabolous species, G. bimaculatus, but it acts in a different manner than in holometabolous species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-1, 7-chome, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of royal jelly on cricket fat body cells. Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adult with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control), or royal jelly diet (RJ). Fat body cells from crickets were observed by microscopy and the cell area was measured as described in the Materials and Methods. The vertical axis indicates the cell area (µm2). All data are plotted (each plot represent each individual) in the graph with boxplots showing quartiles (outliers are plotted as individual points). Control diet and RJ diet-fed males and females were not significantly different (n.s.) from Basal diet-fed males and females.
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BIO019190F5: Effect of royal jelly on cricket fat body cells. Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adult with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control), or royal jelly diet (RJ). Fat body cells from crickets were observed by microscopy and the cell area was measured as described in the Materials and Methods. The vertical axis indicates the cell area (µm2). All data are plotted (each plot represent each individual) in the graph with boxplots showing quartiles (outliers are plotted as individual points). Control diet and RJ diet-fed males and females were not significantly different (n.s.) from Basal diet-fed males and females.

Mentions: In D. melanogaster, royal jelly increases the size of fat body cells (Kamakura, 2011). To examine whether the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly on fat body cells is conserved in B. mori and G. bimaculatus, we prepared sliced specimens and performed microscopic observations of the fat body. In silkworms, royal jelly enlarged the fat body cells (Fig. 4A). The number and total mass of eggs loaded in the female abdomen on the first day of the final molt were also increased (Fig. 4B,C), whereas the mass of each egg remained comparable to those fed the control diet (Fig. 4D). In contrast, we did not observe such an increase in the fat body cell size in crickets (Fig. 5). We did not analyze the effect of royal jelly on cricket eggs, as cricket adults, unlike silkmoths, do not contain mature eggs loaded in the abdomen on the day of the final molt.Fig. 4.


Body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous insect species, Gryllus bimaculatus.

Miyashita A, Kizaki H, Sekimizu K, Kaito C - Biol Open (2016)

Effect of royal jelly on cricket fat body cells. Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adult with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control), or royal jelly diet (RJ). Fat body cells from crickets were observed by microscopy and the cell area was measured as described in the Materials and Methods. The vertical axis indicates the cell area (µm2). All data are plotted (each plot represent each individual) in the graph with boxplots showing quartiles (outliers are plotted as individual points). Control diet and RJ diet-fed males and females were not significantly different (n.s.) from Basal diet-fed males and females.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920200&req=5

BIO019190F5: Effect of royal jelly on cricket fat body cells. Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adult with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control), or royal jelly diet (RJ). Fat body cells from crickets were observed by microscopy and the cell area was measured as described in the Materials and Methods. The vertical axis indicates the cell area (µm2). All data are plotted (each plot represent each individual) in the graph with boxplots showing quartiles (outliers are plotted as individual points). Control diet and RJ diet-fed males and females were not significantly different (n.s.) from Basal diet-fed males and females.
Mentions: In D. melanogaster, royal jelly increases the size of fat body cells (Kamakura, 2011). To examine whether the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly on fat body cells is conserved in B. mori and G. bimaculatus, we prepared sliced specimens and performed microscopic observations of the fat body. In silkworms, royal jelly enlarged the fat body cells (Fig. 4A). The number and total mass of eggs loaded in the female abdomen on the first day of the final molt were also increased (Fig. 4B,C), whereas the mass of each egg remained comparable to those fed the control diet (Fig. 4D). In contrast, we did not observe such an increase in the fat body cell size in crickets (Fig. 5). We did not analyze the effect of royal jelly on cricket eggs, as cricket adults, unlike silkmoths, do not contain mature eggs loaded in the abdomen on the day of the final molt.Fig. 4.

Bottom Line: Honeybee royal jelly is reported to have body-enlarging effects in holometabolous insects such as the honeybee, fly and silkmoth, but its effect in non-holometabolous insect species has not yet been examined.We further examined the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous species, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which belongs to the evolutionarily primitive group Polyneoptera.These findings suggest that the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is common in non-holometabolous species, G. bimaculatus, but it acts in a different manner than in holometabolous species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-1, 7-chome, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus