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Body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous insect species, Gryllus bimaculatus.

Miyashita A, Kizaki H, Sekimizu K, Kaito C - Biol Open (2016)

Bottom Line: Honeybee royal jelly is reported to have body-enlarging effects in holometabolous insects such as the honeybee, fly and silkmoth, but its effect in non-holometabolous insect species has not yet been examined.We further examined the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous species, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which belongs to the evolutionarily primitive group Polyneoptera.These findings suggest that the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is common in non-holometabolous species, G. bimaculatus, but it acts in a different manner than in holometabolous species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-1, 7-chome, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Enlargement of cricket body parts by feeding on royal jelly. (A) Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adults with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control) or royal jelly diet (RJ). Images were obtained on the day of the final molt. Scale bar: 1 cm. (B) Lengths of the body parts we measured in this study are shown. A female cricket is shown in the panel with arrows, indicating the length measured. (C-G) Lengths of body parts are shown. The vertical axes indicate the length of cricket body parts (mm). Crickets were grouped by sex, and the results from those fed the Basal diet (Basal) and royal jelly diet (RJ) are indicated. Asterisks indicate a significant difference (*P<0.025) compared to the Basal diet group in the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The data and statistical information are summarized in Table 3.
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BIO019190F3: Enlargement of cricket body parts by feeding on royal jelly. (A) Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adults with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control) or royal jelly diet (RJ). Images were obtained on the day of the final molt. Scale bar: 1 cm. (B) Lengths of the body parts we measured in this study are shown. A female cricket is shown in the panel with arrows, indicating the length measured. (C-G) Lengths of body parts are shown. The vertical axes indicate the length of cricket body parts (mm). Crickets were grouped by sex, and the results from those fed the Basal diet (Basal) and royal jelly diet (RJ) are indicated. Asterisks indicate a significant difference (*P<0.025) compared to the Basal diet group in the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The data and statistical information are summarized in Table 3.

Mentions: We then examined whether the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is specific among body parts. Based on simple observation, royal jelly administration did not enlarge a specific body area, but rather uniformly enlarged the whole body (Fig. 3A). To quantitatively confirm this observation in crickets, we measured the sizes of body parts of royal jelly-fed or basal diet-fed crickets. We measured the lengths of the whole body (from the top of the head to the tip of the abdomen), thorax, abdomen, femur, and the width of the head (Fig. 3B). Every part of the cricket body examined, except the male thorax, was enlarged by royal jelly (Fig. 3C-G, Table 3).Fig. 3.


Body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous insect species, Gryllus bimaculatus.

Miyashita A, Kizaki H, Sekimizu K, Kaito C - Biol Open (2016)

Enlargement of cricket body parts by feeding on royal jelly. (A) Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adults with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control) or royal jelly diet (RJ). Images were obtained on the day of the final molt. Scale bar: 1 cm. (B) Lengths of the body parts we measured in this study are shown. A female cricket is shown in the panel with arrows, indicating the length measured. (C-G) Lengths of body parts are shown. The vertical axes indicate the length of cricket body parts (mm). Crickets were grouped by sex, and the results from those fed the Basal diet (Basal) and royal jelly diet (RJ) are indicated. Asterisks indicate a significant difference (*P<0.025) compared to the Basal diet group in the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The data and statistical information are summarized in Table 3.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920200&req=5

BIO019190F3: Enlargement of cricket body parts by feeding on royal jelly. (A) Cricket nymphs at second instar nymph stage were reared to adults with the Basal diet (Basal), control diet (Control) or royal jelly diet (RJ). Images were obtained on the day of the final molt. Scale bar: 1 cm. (B) Lengths of the body parts we measured in this study are shown. A female cricket is shown in the panel with arrows, indicating the length measured. (C-G) Lengths of body parts are shown. The vertical axes indicate the length of cricket body parts (mm). Crickets were grouped by sex, and the results from those fed the Basal diet (Basal) and royal jelly diet (RJ) are indicated. Asterisks indicate a significant difference (*P<0.025) compared to the Basal diet group in the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The data and statistical information are summarized in Table 3.
Mentions: We then examined whether the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is specific among body parts. Based on simple observation, royal jelly administration did not enlarge a specific body area, but rather uniformly enlarged the whole body (Fig. 3A). To quantitatively confirm this observation in crickets, we measured the sizes of body parts of royal jelly-fed or basal diet-fed crickets. We measured the lengths of the whole body (from the top of the head to the tip of the abdomen), thorax, abdomen, femur, and the width of the head (Fig. 3B). Every part of the cricket body examined, except the male thorax, was enlarged by royal jelly (Fig. 3C-G, Table 3).Fig. 3.

Bottom Line: Honeybee royal jelly is reported to have body-enlarging effects in holometabolous insects such as the honeybee, fly and silkmoth, but its effect in non-holometabolous insect species has not yet been examined.We further examined the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly in a non-holometabolous species, the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which belongs to the evolutionarily primitive group Polyneoptera.These findings suggest that the body-enlarging effect of royal jelly is common in non-holometabolous species, G. bimaculatus, but it acts in a different manner than in holometabolous species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-1, 7-chome, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus