Limits...
How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression.

Boys CA, Robinson W, Miller B, Pflugrath B, Baumgartner LJ, Navarro A, Brown R, Deng Z - Biol Open (2016)

Bottom Line: Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested.At exposure pressures below ∼40 kPa, or ∼40% of surface pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species.Consequently, if larval drift is expected where river infrastructure is present, adopting design or operational features which maintain exposure pressures at 40% or more of the pressure to which drifting larvae are acclimated may afford greater protection for resident fishes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Port Stephens Fisheries Institute, Taylors Beach Road, Taylors Beach, New South Wales 2316, Australia craig.boys@dpi.nsw.gov.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The percentage of larval Murray cod, silver perch and golden perch dead within 24 h of simulated infrastructure passage at different ages (days post hatch, DPH) and across a range of ratio of pressure changes (RPCE/A). Each point represents the percentage of that test group (10 larvae) affected.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920188&req=5

BIO017491F5: The percentage of larval Murray cod, silver perch and golden perch dead within 24 h of simulated infrastructure passage at different ages (days post hatch, DPH) and across a range of ratio of pressure changes (RPCE/A). Each point represents the percentage of that test group (10 larvae) affected.

Mentions: Despite these observed injuries, we found little evidence that the level of decompression was associated with an increase in short-term (within 24 h) mortality of larvae. For all three species, age (but not RPC) was significantly associated with larval mortality (Table 2). In other words, the severity of decompression did not impact larval mortality although some ages were more susceptible to death than others through experimental handling. The highest mortality was found in 12-day-old golden perch and 10-day-old silver perch (Fig. 5). For 5-, 12- and 18-day-old golden perch, the average rates of mortality were 7.7, 16.3 and 0%, respectively. Murray cod mortality averaged 5% (22-days-old) and 1.7% for (25-days-old), while silver perch had average mortalities of 7, 50 and 0% for 4-, 10- and 22-day-olds, respectively.Table 2.


How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression.

Boys CA, Robinson W, Miller B, Pflugrath B, Baumgartner LJ, Navarro A, Brown R, Deng Z - Biol Open (2016)

The percentage of larval Murray cod, silver perch and golden perch dead within 24 h of simulated infrastructure passage at different ages (days post hatch, DPH) and across a range of ratio of pressure changes (RPCE/A). Each point represents the percentage of that test group (10 larvae) affected.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920188&req=5

BIO017491F5: The percentage of larval Murray cod, silver perch and golden perch dead within 24 h of simulated infrastructure passage at different ages (days post hatch, DPH) and across a range of ratio of pressure changes (RPCE/A). Each point represents the percentage of that test group (10 larvae) affected.
Mentions: Despite these observed injuries, we found little evidence that the level of decompression was associated with an increase in short-term (within 24 h) mortality of larvae. For all three species, age (but not RPC) was significantly associated with larval mortality (Table 2). In other words, the severity of decompression did not impact larval mortality although some ages were more susceptible to death than others through experimental handling. The highest mortality was found in 12-day-old golden perch and 10-day-old silver perch (Fig. 5). For 5-, 12- and 18-day-old golden perch, the average rates of mortality were 7.7, 16.3 and 0%, respectively. Murray cod mortality averaged 5% (22-days-old) and 1.7% for (25-days-old), while silver perch had average mortalities of 7, 50 and 0% for 4-, 10- and 22-day-olds, respectively.Table 2.

Bottom Line: Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested.At exposure pressures below ∼40 kPa, or ∼40% of surface pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species.Consequently, if larval drift is expected where river infrastructure is present, adopting design or operational features which maintain exposure pressures at 40% or more of the pressure to which drifting larvae are acclimated may afford greater protection for resident fishes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Port Stephens Fisheries Institute, Taylors Beach Road, Taylors Beach, New South Wales 2316, Australia craig.boys@dpi.nsw.gov.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus