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Zebrafish fin regeneration after cryoinjury-induced tissue damage.

Chassot B, Pury D, Jaźwińska A - Biol Open (2016)

Bottom Line: In contrast to the common transection model, the damaged part of the fin was spontaneously shed within two days after cryoinjury.Between two and seven days after cryoinjury, this reparative/proliferative phase was morphologically featured by displaced fragments of broken bones.Live imaging of epithelial and osteoblastic transgenic reporter lines revealed that the tissue-specific regenerative programmes were initiated after the clearance of damaged material.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 10, Fribourg 1700, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Accumulation of neutrophils in the damaged tissue indicates an acute inflammatory response after cryoinjury.In-vivo visualization of neutrophils in Tg(mpx:GFP) fish. (A-J) Time-lapse bright-field images of the same fins after amputation (A-E) and cryoinjury (F-J). Frames indicate the regions selected for fluorescence imaging of GFP-positive neutrophils, depicted in A′-Eʺ,F′-Jʺ. Middle region of the fin (orange box) at the level of the amputation plane (dashed line) and cryoinjury plane (blue line). The proximal part of the fin (yellow frame) that is remote from the injury site. In the amputation model (A-E), no change in the distribution of neutrophils is observed at either the amputation plane or proximal site (A′-Eʺ). After cryoinjury (F-J), neutrophils at the site of injury are destroyed (G′,H′), and they start to repopulate the stump margin at 24 hpci (I′) to reach normal distribution at 4 dpci (J″). The proximal intact stump comprises markedly increased numbers of neutrophils at 24 hpci (I″) and 4 dpci (J″). mpa, minutes post-amputation; mpci, minutes post-cryoinjury. N=4. Scale bar in A=1 mm, in A′=100 µm.
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BIO016865F3: Accumulation of neutrophils in the damaged tissue indicates an acute inflammatory response after cryoinjury.In-vivo visualization of neutrophils in Tg(mpx:GFP) fish. (A-J) Time-lapse bright-field images of the same fins after amputation (A-E) and cryoinjury (F-J). Frames indicate the regions selected for fluorescence imaging of GFP-positive neutrophils, depicted in A′-Eʺ,F′-Jʺ. Middle region of the fin (orange box) at the level of the amputation plane (dashed line) and cryoinjury plane (blue line). The proximal part of the fin (yellow frame) that is remote from the injury site. In the amputation model (A-E), no change in the distribution of neutrophils is observed at either the amputation plane or proximal site (A′-Eʺ). After cryoinjury (F-J), neutrophils at the site of injury are destroyed (G′,H′), and they start to repopulate the stump margin at 24 hpci (I′) to reach normal distribution at 4 dpci (J″). The proximal intact stump comprises markedly increased numbers of neutrophils at 24 hpci (I″) and 4 dpci (J″). mpa, minutes post-amputation; mpci, minutes post-cryoinjury. N=4. Scale bar in A=1 mm, in A′=100 µm.

Mentions: In the zebrafish, as in mammals, vasculature is the main path to distribute inflammatory cells to an injury site (Renshaw et al., 2006). A rapid recruitment of neutrophils represents the initial inflammatory response in the zebrafish larval fin (Li et al., 2012). To assess the distribution of neutrophils after fin cryoinjury, as compared to fin amputation, we used the Tg(mpx:GFP) zebrafish and performed time-lapse imaging. We focused on the area of injury and the intact part at the base of the appendage (Fig. 3). In uninjured fins, neutrophils can be observed in the vasculature of the fin (Fig. 3A,F). In the amputation model, no remarkable change in the distribution of mpx:GFP-positive cells was observed at different time points after resection (Fig. 3B-E). By contrast, at 10 min post-cryoinjury (mpci) and 6 hpci, no mpx:GFP expression was detected at the site of cryoinjury, indicating destruction of the blood cells by freezing/thawing (Fig. 3G,H). At 24 hpci, mpx:GFP-positive blood cells started to reappear in the injury zone (Fig. 3I′). Importantly, the proximal intact part of the fin accumulated large numbers of neutrophils, as compared to the stump after amputation at this time point (Fig. 3D″,I″). At 4 dpci, neutrophils invaded the margin of the truncated stump (Fig. 3J′). Moreover, they were markedly increased in the base of the fin in comparison to the amputation model, indicating an inflammatory response (Fig. 3E″,J″). Thus, cryoinjury triggers an enhanced inflammatory response in the remaining part of the fin as compared to the amputation model.Fig. 3.


Zebrafish fin regeneration after cryoinjury-induced tissue damage.

Chassot B, Pury D, Jaźwińska A - Biol Open (2016)

Accumulation of neutrophils in the damaged tissue indicates an acute inflammatory response after cryoinjury.In-vivo visualization of neutrophils in Tg(mpx:GFP) fish. (A-J) Time-lapse bright-field images of the same fins after amputation (A-E) and cryoinjury (F-J). Frames indicate the regions selected for fluorescence imaging of GFP-positive neutrophils, depicted in A′-Eʺ,F′-Jʺ. Middle region of the fin (orange box) at the level of the amputation plane (dashed line) and cryoinjury plane (blue line). The proximal part of the fin (yellow frame) that is remote from the injury site. In the amputation model (A-E), no change in the distribution of neutrophils is observed at either the amputation plane or proximal site (A′-Eʺ). After cryoinjury (F-J), neutrophils at the site of injury are destroyed (G′,H′), and they start to repopulate the stump margin at 24 hpci (I′) to reach normal distribution at 4 dpci (J″). The proximal intact stump comprises markedly increased numbers of neutrophils at 24 hpci (I″) and 4 dpci (J″). mpa, minutes post-amputation; mpci, minutes post-cryoinjury. N=4. Scale bar in A=1 mm, in A′=100 µm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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BIO016865F3: Accumulation of neutrophils in the damaged tissue indicates an acute inflammatory response after cryoinjury.In-vivo visualization of neutrophils in Tg(mpx:GFP) fish. (A-J) Time-lapse bright-field images of the same fins after amputation (A-E) and cryoinjury (F-J). Frames indicate the regions selected for fluorescence imaging of GFP-positive neutrophils, depicted in A′-Eʺ,F′-Jʺ. Middle region of the fin (orange box) at the level of the amputation plane (dashed line) and cryoinjury plane (blue line). The proximal part of the fin (yellow frame) that is remote from the injury site. In the amputation model (A-E), no change in the distribution of neutrophils is observed at either the amputation plane or proximal site (A′-Eʺ). After cryoinjury (F-J), neutrophils at the site of injury are destroyed (G′,H′), and they start to repopulate the stump margin at 24 hpci (I′) to reach normal distribution at 4 dpci (J″). The proximal intact stump comprises markedly increased numbers of neutrophils at 24 hpci (I″) and 4 dpci (J″). mpa, minutes post-amputation; mpci, minutes post-cryoinjury. N=4. Scale bar in A=1 mm, in A′=100 µm.
Mentions: In the zebrafish, as in mammals, vasculature is the main path to distribute inflammatory cells to an injury site (Renshaw et al., 2006). A rapid recruitment of neutrophils represents the initial inflammatory response in the zebrafish larval fin (Li et al., 2012). To assess the distribution of neutrophils after fin cryoinjury, as compared to fin amputation, we used the Tg(mpx:GFP) zebrafish and performed time-lapse imaging. We focused on the area of injury and the intact part at the base of the appendage (Fig. 3). In uninjured fins, neutrophils can be observed in the vasculature of the fin (Fig. 3A,F). In the amputation model, no remarkable change in the distribution of mpx:GFP-positive cells was observed at different time points after resection (Fig. 3B-E). By contrast, at 10 min post-cryoinjury (mpci) and 6 hpci, no mpx:GFP expression was detected at the site of cryoinjury, indicating destruction of the blood cells by freezing/thawing (Fig. 3G,H). At 24 hpci, mpx:GFP-positive blood cells started to reappear in the injury zone (Fig. 3I′). Importantly, the proximal intact part of the fin accumulated large numbers of neutrophils, as compared to the stump after amputation at this time point (Fig. 3D″,I″). At 4 dpci, neutrophils invaded the margin of the truncated stump (Fig. 3J′). Moreover, they were markedly increased in the base of the fin in comparison to the amputation model, indicating an inflammatory response (Fig. 3E″,J″). Thus, cryoinjury triggers an enhanced inflammatory response in the remaining part of the fin as compared to the amputation model.Fig. 3.

Bottom Line: In contrast to the common transection model, the damaged part of the fin was spontaneously shed within two days after cryoinjury.Between two and seven days after cryoinjury, this reparative/proliferative phase was morphologically featured by displaced fragments of broken bones.Live imaging of epithelial and osteoblastic transgenic reporter lines revealed that the tissue-specific regenerative programmes were initiated after the clearance of damaged material.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 10, Fribourg 1700, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus