Limits...
Dose-Dependent Changes in Auditory Sensory Gating in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Cynomolgus Monkey.

Huang H, Ya J, Wu Z, Wen C, Zheng S, Tian C, Ren H, Carlson S, Yu H, Chen F, Wang J - Med. Sci. Monit. (2016)

Bottom Line: RESULTS We demonstrated the following: (1) Administration of mid-dose bromocriptine disrupted sensory gating (N100) in the right temporal lobe, while neither low-dose nor high-dose bromocriptine impaired gating. (2) Low-dose haloperidol impaired gating in the right prefrontal cortex.High-dose haloperidol had no obvious effect on sensory gating. (3) Gating was impaired by PCP in the left parietal lobe.The dopaminergic system influenced sensory gating in a dose- and region-dependent pattern, which might modulate the different stages that receive further processing due to novel information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliation Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan, China (mainland).

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND Sensory gating, often described as the ability to filter out irrelevant information that is repeated in close temporal proximity, is essential for the selection, processing, and storage of more salient information. This study aimed to test the effect of sensory gating under anesthesia in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys following injection of bromocriptine, haloperidol, and phencyclidine (PCP). MATERIAL AND METHODS We used an auditory evoked potential that can be elicited by sound to examine sensory gating during treatment with haloperidol, bromocriptine, and PCP in the PFC in the cynomolgus monkey. Scalp electrodes were located in the bilateral PFC and bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, and occipital lobes. Administration of bromocriptine (0.313 mg/kg, 0.625 mg/kg, and 1.25 mg/kg), haloperidol (0.001 mg/kg, 0.01 mg/kg, and 0.05 mg/kg), and the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist PCP (0.3 mg/kg) influenced sensory gating. RESULTS We demonstrated the following: (1) Administration of mid-dose bromocriptine disrupted sensory gating (N100) in the right temporal lobe, while neither low-dose nor high-dose bromocriptine impaired gating. (2) Low-dose haloperidol impaired gating in the right prefrontal cortex. Mid-dose haloperidol disrupted sensory gating in left occipital lobe. High-dose haloperidol had no obvious effect on sensory gating. (3) Gating was impaired by PCP in the left parietal lobe. CONCLUSIONS Our studies showed that information processing was regulated by the dopaminergic system, which might play an important role in the PFC. The dopaminergic system influenced sensory gating in a dose- and region-dependent pattern, which might modulate the different stages that receive further processing due to novel information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effects of administration of PCP on sensory gating in the PFC. PCP – PCP (0.3 mg/kg) group; CP3 – left parietal lobe; CP4 – right parietal lobe; F3 – left PFC; F4 – right PFC; FT7 – left temporal lobe; FT8 – right temporal lobe; O1 – left occipital lobe; O2 – right occipital lobe. There was a significant difference in CP3 between the PCP and saline control groups (P=0.047), and sensory gating in the PCP group was significantly higher than that in the saline control group. Sensory gating in the PCP group was higher than that in the saline control group in the CP4, F3, F4, FT8, O1, and O2, and higher in the control group than in the PCP group in the FT7, but there was no significant difference. The data are expressed as the mean ±SD. * represents P<0.05, with the one-way repeated-measures ANOVA and LSD post hoc test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920095&req=5

f4-medscimonit-22-1752: The effects of administration of PCP on sensory gating in the PFC. PCP – PCP (0.3 mg/kg) group; CP3 – left parietal lobe; CP4 – right parietal lobe; F3 – left PFC; F4 – right PFC; FT7 – left temporal lobe; FT8 – right temporal lobe; O1 – left occipital lobe; O2 – right occipital lobe. There was a significant difference in CP3 between the PCP and saline control groups (P=0.047), and sensory gating in the PCP group was significantly higher than that in the saline control group. Sensory gating in the PCP group was higher than that in the saline control group in the CP4, F3, F4, FT8, O1, and O2, and higher in the control group than in the PCP group in the FT7, but there was no significant difference. The data are expressed as the mean ±SD. * represents P<0.05, with the one-way repeated-measures ANOVA and LSD post hoc test.

Mentions: The effect of PCP (0.3 mg/kg) administration on sensory gating was compared with that of the control. There was no significant effect of PCP in the PFC. However, the effect of PCP (0.3 mg/kg) in the left parietal lobe was significantly higher than that of the control (P<0.05). Sensory gating in areas other than left temporal lobe also was higher than that in the control, but there was no significant difference. These results showed that PCP (0.3 mg/kg) did not cause significant suppression of sensory gating in the PFC; however, in the left parietal lobe, sensory gating was impaired (Figure 4).


Dose-Dependent Changes in Auditory Sensory Gating in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Cynomolgus Monkey.

Huang H, Ya J, Wu Z, Wen C, Zheng S, Tian C, Ren H, Carlson S, Yu H, Chen F, Wang J - Med. Sci. Monit. (2016)

The effects of administration of PCP on sensory gating in the PFC. PCP – PCP (0.3 mg/kg) group; CP3 – left parietal lobe; CP4 – right parietal lobe; F3 – left PFC; F4 – right PFC; FT7 – left temporal lobe; FT8 – right temporal lobe; O1 – left occipital lobe; O2 – right occipital lobe. There was a significant difference in CP3 between the PCP and saline control groups (P=0.047), and sensory gating in the PCP group was significantly higher than that in the saline control group. Sensory gating in the PCP group was higher than that in the saline control group in the CP4, F3, F4, FT8, O1, and O2, and higher in the control group than in the PCP group in the FT7, but there was no significant difference. The data are expressed as the mean ±SD. * represents P<0.05, with the one-way repeated-measures ANOVA and LSD post hoc test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920095&req=5

f4-medscimonit-22-1752: The effects of administration of PCP on sensory gating in the PFC. PCP – PCP (0.3 mg/kg) group; CP3 – left parietal lobe; CP4 – right parietal lobe; F3 – left PFC; F4 – right PFC; FT7 – left temporal lobe; FT8 – right temporal lobe; O1 – left occipital lobe; O2 – right occipital lobe. There was a significant difference in CP3 between the PCP and saline control groups (P=0.047), and sensory gating in the PCP group was significantly higher than that in the saline control group. Sensory gating in the PCP group was higher than that in the saline control group in the CP4, F3, F4, FT8, O1, and O2, and higher in the control group than in the PCP group in the FT7, but there was no significant difference. The data are expressed as the mean ±SD. * represents P<0.05, with the one-way repeated-measures ANOVA and LSD post hoc test.
Mentions: The effect of PCP (0.3 mg/kg) administration on sensory gating was compared with that of the control. There was no significant effect of PCP in the PFC. However, the effect of PCP (0.3 mg/kg) in the left parietal lobe was significantly higher than that of the control (P<0.05). Sensory gating in areas other than left temporal lobe also was higher than that in the control, but there was no significant difference. These results showed that PCP (0.3 mg/kg) did not cause significant suppression of sensory gating in the PFC; however, in the left parietal lobe, sensory gating was impaired (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: RESULTS We demonstrated the following: (1) Administration of mid-dose bromocriptine disrupted sensory gating (N100) in the right temporal lobe, while neither low-dose nor high-dose bromocriptine impaired gating. (2) Low-dose haloperidol impaired gating in the right prefrontal cortex.High-dose haloperidol had no obvious effect on sensory gating. (3) Gating was impaired by PCP in the left parietal lobe.The dopaminergic system influenced sensory gating in a dose- and region-dependent pattern, which might modulate the different stages that receive further processing due to novel information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliation Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan, China (mainland).

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND Sensory gating, often described as the ability to filter out irrelevant information that is repeated in close temporal proximity, is essential for the selection, processing, and storage of more salient information. This study aimed to test the effect of sensory gating under anesthesia in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys following injection of bromocriptine, haloperidol, and phencyclidine (PCP). MATERIAL AND METHODS We used an auditory evoked potential that can be elicited by sound to examine sensory gating during treatment with haloperidol, bromocriptine, and PCP in the PFC in the cynomolgus monkey. Scalp electrodes were located in the bilateral PFC and bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, and occipital lobes. Administration of bromocriptine (0.313 mg/kg, 0.625 mg/kg, and 1.25 mg/kg), haloperidol (0.001 mg/kg, 0.01 mg/kg, and 0.05 mg/kg), and the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist PCP (0.3 mg/kg) influenced sensory gating. RESULTS We demonstrated the following: (1) Administration of mid-dose bromocriptine disrupted sensory gating (N100) in the right temporal lobe, while neither low-dose nor high-dose bromocriptine impaired gating. (2) Low-dose haloperidol impaired gating in the right prefrontal cortex. Mid-dose haloperidol disrupted sensory gating in left occipital lobe. High-dose haloperidol had no obvious effect on sensory gating. (3) Gating was impaired by PCP in the left parietal lobe. CONCLUSIONS Our studies showed that information processing was regulated by the dopaminergic system, which might play an important role in the PFC. The dopaminergic system influenced sensory gating in a dose- and region-dependent pattern, which might modulate the different stages that receive further processing due to novel information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus