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Comparing pre- and post-copulatory mate competition using social network analysis in wild crickets.

Fisher DN, Rodríguez-Muñoz R, Tregenza T - Behav. Ecol. (2016)

Bottom Line: Social network analysis then allowed us to determine 1) the effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition, 2) the potential for divergent mating strategies, and 3) whether increased postcopulatory competition reduces the apparent reproductive benefits of male promiscuity.We found 1) limited effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition; 2) males do not specifically engage in only 1 type of competition; and 3) promiscuous individuals tend to mate with each other, which will tend to reduce variance in reproductive success in the population and highlights the trade-off inherent in mate guarding.Our results provide novel insights into the works of sexual competition in the wild.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter , Penryn Campus, Treliever Road, Penryn, Cornwall TR109FE , UK.

ABSTRACT

Sexual selection results from variation in success at multiple stages in the mating process, including competition before and after mating. The relationship between these forms of competition, such as whether they trade-off or reinforce one another, influences the role of sexual selection in evolution. However, the relationship between these 2 forms of competition is rarely quantified in the wild. We used video cameras to observe competition among male field crickets and their matings in the wild. We characterized pre- and post-copulatory competition as 2 networks of competing individuals. Social network analysis then allowed us to determine 1) the effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition, 2) the potential for divergent mating strategies, and 3) whether increased postcopulatory competition reduces the apparent reproductive benefits of male promiscuity. We found 1) limited effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition; 2) males do not specifically engage in only 1 type of competition; and 3) promiscuous individuals tend to mate with each other, which will tend to reduce variance in reproductive success in the population and highlights the trade-off inherent in mate guarding. Our results provide novel insights into the works of sexual competition in the wild. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the utility of using network analyses to study competitive interactions, even in species lacking obvious social structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Plots of the simulated and actual correlations between male degree and female degree from the mating network in each year. The solid points indicate the medians, dashed horizontal lines the 50% quantiles, and the solid horizontal lines the 95% quantiles. Simulated networks possessed only links between crickets that overlapped in both space and time, and were on average the same density as the original network (see Methods for details). The observed value for each year is plotted as an asterisk. The correlation in 2006 (0.193) was greater than 99.7% of simulated correlations, whereas the correlation in 2013 (0.068) was greater than 70% of simulated correlations.
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Figure 3: Plots of the simulated and actual correlations between male degree and female degree from the mating network in each year. The solid points indicate the medians, dashed horizontal lines the 50% quantiles, and the solid horizontal lines the 95% quantiles. Simulated networks possessed only links between crickets that overlapped in both space and time, and were on average the same density as the original network (see Methods for details). The observed value for each year is plotted as an asterisk. The correlation in 2006 (0.193) was greater than 99.7% of simulated correlations, whereas the correlation in 2013 (0.068) was greater than 70% of simulated correlations.

Mentions: There was a positive degree correlation in the male–female mating network in 2006, but there was no correlation in 2013 (Spearman rank correlation, 2006: N = 93, rs = 0.193, permutation P value = 0.003; 2013: N = 246, rs = 0.068, permutation P value = 0.300). Plots of the simulated versus observed correlations are shown in Figure 3.


Comparing pre- and post-copulatory mate competition using social network analysis in wild crickets.

Fisher DN, Rodríguez-Muñoz R, Tregenza T - Behav. Ecol. (2016)

Plots of the simulated and actual correlations between male degree and female degree from the mating network in each year. The solid points indicate the medians, dashed horizontal lines the 50% quantiles, and the solid horizontal lines the 95% quantiles. Simulated networks possessed only links between crickets that overlapped in both space and time, and were on average the same density as the original network (see Methods for details). The observed value for each year is plotted as an asterisk. The correlation in 2006 (0.193) was greater than 99.7% of simulated correlations, whereas the correlation in 2013 (0.068) was greater than 70% of simulated correlations.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4863196&req=5

Figure 3: Plots of the simulated and actual correlations between male degree and female degree from the mating network in each year. The solid points indicate the medians, dashed horizontal lines the 50% quantiles, and the solid horizontal lines the 95% quantiles. Simulated networks possessed only links between crickets that overlapped in both space and time, and were on average the same density as the original network (see Methods for details). The observed value for each year is plotted as an asterisk. The correlation in 2006 (0.193) was greater than 99.7% of simulated correlations, whereas the correlation in 2013 (0.068) was greater than 70% of simulated correlations.
Mentions: There was a positive degree correlation in the male–female mating network in 2006, but there was no correlation in 2013 (Spearman rank correlation, 2006: N = 93, rs = 0.193, permutation P value = 0.003; 2013: N = 246, rs = 0.068, permutation P value = 0.300). Plots of the simulated versus observed correlations are shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Social network analysis then allowed us to determine 1) the effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition, 2) the potential for divergent mating strategies, and 3) whether increased postcopulatory competition reduces the apparent reproductive benefits of male promiscuity.We found 1) limited effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition; 2) males do not specifically engage in only 1 type of competition; and 3) promiscuous individuals tend to mate with each other, which will tend to reduce variance in reproductive success in the population and highlights the trade-off inherent in mate guarding.Our results provide novel insights into the works of sexual competition in the wild.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter , Penryn Campus, Treliever Road, Penryn, Cornwall TR109FE , UK.

ABSTRACT

Sexual selection results from variation in success at multiple stages in the mating process, including competition before and after mating. The relationship between these forms of competition, such as whether they trade-off or reinforce one another, influences the role of sexual selection in evolution. However, the relationship between these 2 forms of competition is rarely quantified in the wild. We used video cameras to observe competition among male field crickets and their matings in the wild. We characterized pre- and post-copulatory competition as 2 networks of competing individuals. Social network analysis then allowed us to determine 1) the effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition, 2) the potential for divergent mating strategies, and 3) whether increased postcopulatory competition reduces the apparent reproductive benefits of male promiscuity. We found 1) limited effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition; 2) males do not specifically engage in only 1 type of competition; and 3) promiscuous individuals tend to mate with each other, which will tend to reduce variance in reproductive success in the population and highlights the trade-off inherent in mate guarding. Our results provide novel insights into the works of sexual competition in the wild. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the utility of using network analyses to study competitive interactions, even in species lacking obvious social structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus