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Imaging panorama in postoperative complications after liver transplantation.

Sureka B, Bansal K, Rajesh S, Mukund A, Pamecha V, Arora A - Gastroenterol Rep (Oxf) (2015)

Bottom Line: The liver is the second most-often transplanted solid organ after the kidney, so it is clear that liver disease is a common and serious problem around the globe.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for the diagnosis of biliary complications, bile leaks and neurological complications.This article illustrates the imaging options for diagnosing the various complications that can be encountered in the postoperative period after liver transplantation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology/Interventional Radiology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi, India binitsurekapgi@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Central pontine myelinolysis. Axial T2-weighted MR brain showing central hyperintensity in pons in a case of pontine myelinolysis.
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gov057-F13: Central pontine myelinolysis. Axial T2-weighted MR brain showing central hyperintensity in pons in a case of pontine myelinolysis.

Mentions: Various neurological complications after liver transplant are post-transplant encephalopathy, hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema (Figure 12), opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections due to chronic immunosuppression, central pontine (Figure 13) and extrapontine myelinolysis in the first 48 hours due to rapid correction of hyponatremia, acquired hepatocerebral degeneration, seizures due to focal brain lesions, CNS infections or even posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Cerebrovascular complications such as ischemic strokes and intracranial hemorrhage are rare after liver transplantation, with a reported prevalence of 2–4% in transplant recipients, particularly in older recipients and patients with pre-transplant diabetes. Liver failure resulting from different causes may also manifest with various neurologic symptoms including hepatic encephalopathy, Parkinsonism, asterixis, tremor and hepatic neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may also be specific to causes of liver failure such as Wilson’s disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, hepatitis C virus infection and primary biliary cirrhosis. Immunosuppressive neurotoxicity, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder may be also seen [48].Figure 12.


Imaging panorama in postoperative complications after liver transplantation.

Sureka B, Bansal K, Rajesh S, Mukund A, Pamecha V, Arora A - Gastroenterol Rep (Oxf) (2015)

Central pontine myelinolysis. Axial T2-weighted MR brain showing central hyperintensity in pons in a case of pontine myelinolysis.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4863188&req=5

gov057-F13: Central pontine myelinolysis. Axial T2-weighted MR brain showing central hyperintensity in pons in a case of pontine myelinolysis.
Mentions: Various neurological complications after liver transplant are post-transplant encephalopathy, hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema (Figure 12), opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections due to chronic immunosuppression, central pontine (Figure 13) and extrapontine myelinolysis in the first 48 hours due to rapid correction of hyponatremia, acquired hepatocerebral degeneration, seizures due to focal brain lesions, CNS infections or even posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Cerebrovascular complications such as ischemic strokes and intracranial hemorrhage are rare after liver transplantation, with a reported prevalence of 2–4% in transplant recipients, particularly in older recipients and patients with pre-transplant diabetes. Liver failure resulting from different causes may also manifest with various neurologic symptoms including hepatic encephalopathy, Parkinsonism, asterixis, tremor and hepatic neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may also be specific to causes of liver failure such as Wilson’s disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, hepatitis C virus infection and primary biliary cirrhosis. Immunosuppressive neurotoxicity, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder may be also seen [48].Figure 12.

Bottom Line: The liver is the second most-often transplanted solid organ after the kidney, so it is clear that liver disease is a common and serious problem around the globe.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for the diagnosis of biliary complications, bile leaks and neurological complications.This article illustrates the imaging options for diagnosing the various complications that can be encountered in the postoperative period after liver transplantation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology/Interventional Radiology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi, India binitsurekapgi@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus