Limits...
Recurrent short sleep, chronic insomnia symptoms and salivary cortisol: A 10-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study.

Abell JG, Shipley MJ, Ferrie JE, Kivimäki M, Kumari M - Psychoneuroendocrinology (2016)

Bottom Line: Recurrent short sleep was associated with a flatter diurnal cortisol pattern.Participants reporting short sleep on three occasions had higher levels of cortisol later in the day, compared to those never reporting short sleep, indicated by a positive interaction with hours since waking (β=0.02 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.03)).We conclude that recurrent sleep problems are associated with adverse salivary cortisol patterns throughout the day.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: jessica.abell@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Morning rise in cortisol by chronic insomnia symptoms (mean predicted value of ln (cortisol) by hours since waking, estimated from model 1, Table 3).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862960&req=5

fig0015: Morning rise in cortisol by chronic insomnia symptoms (mean predicted value of ln (cortisol) by hours since waking, estimated from model 1, Table 3).

Mentions: Table 3 shows the adjusted and unadjusted models of ln(cortisol) on waking and after 30 min, regressed on exposure to recurrent short sleep. There is a significant interaction between short sleep on two occasions and hours since waking. Those who reported short sleep on two or more occasions have low levels of cortisol when they wake, compared to those who report no short sleep. As displayed in Fig. 2, the morning rise was steepest for those who reported short sleep on two occasions. These results were robust in Model 2 to additional adjustment for other covariates. Table 3 also shows the morning rise in cortisol associated with chronic insomnia symptoms. Those who reported high insomnia symptoms on three occasions have lower levels of cortisol when they wake compared to those who never reported high insomnia symptoms. There is also a significant interaction between hours since waking and high insomnia symptoms on three occasions. As shown in Fig. 3 this results in a steeper rise in morning cortisol among those reporting high insomnia symptoms on three occasions, compared to those who never report insomnia symptoms. Potential differences by sex in the results were examined by including a three way interaction (sleep exposure × hours since waking × sex). These were not found to be significant for any of the results. P values for these interactions are reported in the footnotes to Table 2, Table 3.


Recurrent short sleep, chronic insomnia symptoms and salivary cortisol: A 10-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study.

Abell JG, Shipley MJ, Ferrie JE, Kivimäki M, Kumari M - Psychoneuroendocrinology (2016)

Morning rise in cortisol by chronic insomnia symptoms (mean predicted value of ln (cortisol) by hours since waking, estimated from model 1, Table 3).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862960&req=5

fig0015: Morning rise in cortisol by chronic insomnia symptoms (mean predicted value of ln (cortisol) by hours since waking, estimated from model 1, Table 3).
Mentions: Table 3 shows the adjusted and unadjusted models of ln(cortisol) on waking and after 30 min, regressed on exposure to recurrent short sleep. There is a significant interaction between short sleep on two occasions and hours since waking. Those who reported short sleep on two or more occasions have low levels of cortisol when they wake, compared to those who report no short sleep. As displayed in Fig. 2, the morning rise was steepest for those who reported short sleep on two occasions. These results were robust in Model 2 to additional adjustment for other covariates. Table 3 also shows the morning rise in cortisol associated with chronic insomnia symptoms. Those who reported high insomnia symptoms on three occasions have lower levels of cortisol when they wake compared to those who never reported high insomnia symptoms. There is also a significant interaction between hours since waking and high insomnia symptoms on three occasions. As shown in Fig. 3 this results in a steeper rise in morning cortisol among those reporting high insomnia symptoms on three occasions, compared to those who never report insomnia symptoms. Potential differences by sex in the results were examined by including a three way interaction (sleep exposure × hours since waking × sex). These were not found to be significant for any of the results. P values for these interactions are reported in the footnotes to Table 2, Table 3.

Bottom Line: Recurrent short sleep was associated with a flatter diurnal cortisol pattern.Participants reporting short sleep on three occasions had higher levels of cortisol later in the day, compared to those never reporting short sleep, indicated by a positive interaction with hours since waking (β=0.02 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.03)).We conclude that recurrent sleep problems are associated with adverse salivary cortisol patterns throughout the day.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: jessica.abell@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus