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Sources of Error in UV Radiation Measurements

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Increasing commercial, scientific, and technical applications involving ultraviolet (UV) radiation have led to the demand for improved understanding of the performance of instrumentation used to measure this radiation. There has been an effort by manufacturers of UV measuring devices (meters) to produce simple, optically filtered sensor systems to accomplish the varied measurement needs. We address common sources of measurement errors using these meters. The uncertainty in the calibration of the instrument depends on the response of the UV meter to the spectrum of the sources used and its similarity to the spectrum of the quantity to be measured. In addition, large errors can occur due to out-of-band, non-linear, and non-ideal geometric or spatial response of the UV meters. Finally, in many applications, how well the response of the UV meter approximates the presumed action spectrum needs to be understood for optimal use of the meters.

No MeSH data available.


Diagram of UV radiometer with optical components highlighted.
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f1-j64lar: Diagram of UV radiometer with optical components highlighted.

Mentions: Considerable effort has been made to produce simple instrumentation to meet these wide-ranging UV measurement needs. The typical UV meter or radiometer is composed of a number of simple optical elements, as shown in Fig. 1. The incident radiation passes through an aperture that limits the active area of the system. A diffuser is often placed after the aperture and is used to improve the angular response and spatial uniformity of the instrument. An optical filter is then employed to select the spectral region of the incident optical radiation that strikes the detector.


Sources of Error in UV Radiation Measurements
Diagram of UV radiometer with optical components highlighted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862826&req=5

f1-j64lar: Diagram of UV radiometer with optical components highlighted.
Mentions: Considerable effort has been made to produce simple instrumentation to meet these wide-ranging UV measurement needs. The typical UV meter or radiometer is composed of a number of simple optical elements, as shown in Fig. 1. The incident radiation passes through an aperture that limits the active area of the system. A diffuser is often placed after the aperture and is used to improve the angular response and spatial uniformity of the instrument. An optical filter is then employed to select the spectral region of the incident optical radiation that strikes the detector.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Increasing commercial, scientific, and technical applications involving ultraviolet (UV) radiation have led to the demand for improved understanding of the performance of instrumentation used to measure this radiation. There has been an effort by manufacturers of UV measuring devices (meters) to produce simple, optically filtered sensor systems to accomplish the varied measurement needs. We address common sources of measurement errors using these meters. The uncertainty in the calibration of the instrument depends on the response of the UV meter to the spectrum of the sources used and its similarity to the spectrum of the quantity to be measured. In addition, large errors can occur due to out-of-band, non-linear, and non-ideal geometric or spatial response of the UV meters. Finally, in many applications, how well the response of the UV meter approximates the presumed action spectrum needs to be understood for optimal use of the meters.

No MeSH data available.