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Fraunhofer Diffraction Effects on Total Power for a Planckian Source

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ABSTRACT

An algorithm for computing diffraction effects on total power in the case of Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular lens or aperture is derived. The result for Fraunhofer diffraction of monochromatic radiation is well known, and this work reports the result for radiation from a Planckian source. The result obtained is valid at all temperatures.

No MeSH data available.


Two optical systems are shown, for which the (spectral) power detected is subject to Fraunhofer diffraction. In the first system (a), a lens concentrates radiation on the detector. In the second system (b), radiation from a blackbody cavity may pass through the blackbody cavity opening, pass through the pinhole aperture, and reach the detector pupil.
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f1-j65shi: Two optical systems are shown, for which the (spectral) power detected is subject to Fraunhofer diffraction. In the first system (a), a lens concentrates radiation on the detector. In the second system (b), radiation from a blackbody cavity may pass through the blackbody cavity opening, pass through the pinhole aperture, and reach the detector pupil.

Mentions: Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular lens or aperture is a ubiquitous phenomenon in optics in general and radiometry in particular. Figure 1 illustrates two practical situations in which Fraunhofer diffraction occurs. In the first example, diffraction limits the ability of a lens or other focusing optic to focus light. According to geometrical optics, it is possible to focus rays incident on a lens to converge at a focal point. In practice, even with the focal point at the center of a finite-sized circular detector, some of the light incident on the lens fails to be collected, giving rise to a “diffraction loss.”


Fraunhofer Diffraction Effects on Total Power for a Planckian Source
Two optical systems are shown, for which the (spectral) power detected is subject to Fraunhofer diffraction. In the first system (a), a lens concentrates radiation on the detector. In the second system (b), radiation from a blackbody cavity may pass through the blackbody cavity opening, pass through the pinhole aperture, and reach the detector pupil.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862821&req=5

f1-j65shi: Two optical systems are shown, for which the (spectral) power detected is subject to Fraunhofer diffraction. In the first system (a), a lens concentrates radiation on the detector. In the second system (b), radiation from a blackbody cavity may pass through the blackbody cavity opening, pass through the pinhole aperture, and reach the detector pupil.
Mentions: Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular lens or aperture is a ubiquitous phenomenon in optics in general and radiometry in particular. Figure 1 illustrates two practical situations in which Fraunhofer diffraction occurs. In the first example, diffraction limits the ability of a lens or other focusing optic to focus light. According to geometrical optics, it is possible to focus rays incident on a lens to converge at a focal point. In practice, even with the focal point at the center of a finite-sized circular detector, some of the light incident on the lens fails to be collected, giving rise to a “diffraction loss.”

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

An algorithm for computing diffraction effects on total power in the case of Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular lens or aperture is derived. The result for Fraunhofer diffraction of monochromatic radiation is well known, and this work reports the result for radiation from a Planckian source. The result obtained is valid at all temperatures.

No MeSH data available.