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Concordance between two methods in measuring treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes.

López-Simarro F, Brotons C, Moral I, Aguado-Jodar A, Cols-Sagarra C, Miravet-Jiménez S - Patient Prefer Adherence (2016)

Bottom Line: The multivariate analysis found good oral antidiabetic adherence to be associated to free pharmacy service; good antihypertensive drug adherence to the existence of comorbidities; and good lipid-lowering drug adherence to a history of ischemic heart disease, and a more experienced physician and/or female physician.An improved TA was associated with a better control of the studied parameters.Comorbidities, such as ischemic heart disease and access to free pharmacy service, were identified as determinants of good TA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Health Care Center Martorell, Institut Català de la Salut, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We analyzed the concordance between two methods for measuring treatment adherence (TA) and studied the determinants of TA in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study in a primary care center, involving 320 diabetic patients. TA was measured using the Haynes-Sackett (H-S) adherence test during the patient interview and based on pharmacy refill data. TA was calculated globally and by drug groups (antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic drugs).

Results: Poor TA as measured by the H-S test was observed in 11.2% of the patients. Based on pharmacy refill data, there was a poor global TA rate of 30.3%, which was 33.3%, 26.6%, and 34.2% for oral antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering drugs, respectively. Concordance between the two methods was poor. There was no relationship between the degree of disease control and TA as measured by the H-S test. Good TA measured based on pharmacy refill data for antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs was associated with lower glycosylated hemoglobin and diastolic blood pressure values, respectively. Patients with good global TA showed lower glycosylated hemoglobin, diastolic blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values. The multivariate analysis found good oral antidiabetic adherence to be associated to free pharmacy service; good antihypertensive drug adherence to the existence of comorbidities; and good lipid-lowering drug adherence to a history of ischemic heart disease, and a more experienced physician and/or female physician.

Conclusion: Concordance between the two methods in assessing TA was low. Approximately one-third of the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented poor TA in relation to antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic medication. An improved TA was associated with a better control of the studied parameters. Comorbidities, such as ischemic heart disease and access to free pharmacy service, were identified as determinants of good TA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Treatment adherence according to prescription refill.
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f1-ppa-10-743: Treatment adherence according to prescription refill.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the degree of TA globally and according to each drug group. Poor TA was recorded in 33.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27.9–39.1), 26.6% (95% CI: 21.2–32.5), and 34.2% (95% CI: 27.6–41.3) of the cases referred to oral antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering drugs, respectively. On assessing global TA for all the drugs, 30.3% of the patients (95% CI: 21.2–32.5) showed poor TA. The mean percentage of refilled prescriptions corresponding to all the analyzed drugs was 85.6%, while 88.8% of the patients claimed to have no problems in taking their tablets (Table 1).


Concordance between two methods in measuring treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes.

López-Simarro F, Brotons C, Moral I, Aguado-Jodar A, Cols-Sagarra C, Miravet-Jiménez S - Patient Prefer Adherence (2016)

Treatment adherence according to prescription refill.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862387&req=5

f1-ppa-10-743: Treatment adherence according to prescription refill.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the degree of TA globally and according to each drug group. Poor TA was recorded in 33.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27.9–39.1), 26.6% (95% CI: 21.2–32.5), and 34.2% (95% CI: 27.6–41.3) of the cases referred to oral antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering drugs, respectively. On assessing global TA for all the drugs, 30.3% of the patients (95% CI: 21.2–32.5) showed poor TA. The mean percentage of refilled prescriptions corresponding to all the analyzed drugs was 85.6%, while 88.8% of the patients claimed to have no problems in taking their tablets (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The multivariate analysis found good oral antidiabetic adherence to be associated to free pharmacy service; good antihypertensive drug adherence to the existence of comorbidities; and good lipid-lowering drug adherence to a history of ischemic heart disease, and a more experienced physician and/or female physician.An improved TA was associated with a better control of the studied parameters.Comorbidities, such as ischemic heart disease and access to free pharmacy service, were identified as determinants of good TA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Health Care Center Martorell, Institut Català de la Salut, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We analyzed the concordance between two methods for measuring treatment adherence (TA) and studied the determinants of TA in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study in a primary care center, involving 320 diabetic patients. TA was measured using the Haynes-Sackett (H-S) adherence test during the patient interview and based on pharmacy refill data. TA was calculated globally and by drug groups (antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic drugs).

Results: Poor TA as measured by the H-S test was observed in 11.2% of the patients. Based on pharmacy refill data, there was a poor global TA rate of 30.3%, which was 33.3%, 26.6%, and 34.2% for oral antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering drugs, respectively. Concordance between the two methods was poor. There was no relationship between the degree of disease control and TA as measured by the H-S test. Good TA measured based on pharmacy refill data for antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs was associated with lower glycosylated hemoglobin and diastolic blood pressure values, respectively. Patients with good global TA showed lower glycosylated hemoglobin, diastolic blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values. The multivariate analysis found good oral antidiabetic adherence to be associated to free pharmacy service; good antihypertensive drug adherence to the existence of comorbidities; and good lipid-lowering drug adherence to a history of ischemic heart disease, and a more experienced physician and/or female physician.

Conclusion: Concordance between the two methods in assessing TA was low. Approximately one-third of the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented poor TA in relation to antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic medication. An improved TA was associated with a better control of the studied parameters. Comorbidities, such as ischemic heart disease and access to free pharmacy service, were identified as determinants of good TA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus