Limits...
Solar radiation and the incidence and mortality of leading invasive cancers in the United States.

Fleischer AB, Fleischer SE - Dermatoendocrinol (2016)

Bottom Line: We obtained the North America Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) daily average sunlight for the continental United States from 1999-2011.We found that cancer incidence for all invasive cancers and for 11 of 22 leading cancers significantly decreased with increased solar radiation.Cancer mortality for all invasive cancers was not significantly associated with solar radiation, but for 7 of 22 leading cancers, including cancers of the uterus, leukemias, lung, ovary, and urinary bladder, increased solar radiation predicted decreased mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky College of Medicine , Lexington, KY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Invasive cancer risk is inversely related to ultraviolet light exposure. This study explores relationships between cancer and the satellite-derived sunlight energy. We obtained the North America Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) daily average sunlight for the continental United States from 1999-2011. US Cancer Statistics age-adjusted-incidence and mortality was also obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We found that cancer incidence for all invasive cancers and for 11 of 22 leading cancers significantly decreased with increased solar radiation. Cancer mortality for all invasive cancers was not significantly associated with solar radiation, but for 7 of 22 leading cancers, including cancers of the uterus, leukemias, lung, ovary, and urinary bladder, increased solar radiation predicted decreased mortality. With increasing solar radiation, increased incidence and cancer mortality was observed for liver cancer and increased incidence but not mortality was observed for cervical cancer. The current study confirms studies relating UV radiation to the incidence and mortality of a variety of cancer types. We find associations between solar radiation energy and the incidence and mortality of a number of types of cancers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

These 22 figures relate the relationships between average daily solar radiation and the mortality from the leading types of cancer between 1999 and 2011. Each data point represents an individual US State or the District of Columbia and solar energy is in units of KJ/m2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862378&req=5

f0003: These 22 figures relate the relationships between average daily solar radiation and the mortality from the leading types of cancer between 1999 and 2011. Each data point represents an individual US State or the District of Columbia and solar energy is in units of KJ/m2.

Mentions: Cancer Mortality. We found no association between increasing solar energy and decreasing cancer incidence for all invasive cancers (Fig. 1, p = .12). Associations were demonstrated between increasing solar energy and decreasing cancer incidence for: uterine cancer (Fig. 3, p = .01), esophageal cancer (p < .001), leukemias (p = .002), lung cancer (p < .001), non-Hodgkins lymphoma (p < .001), ovarian cancer (p = .006), and urinary bladder (p < .001).


Solar radiation and the incidence and mortality of leading invasive cancers in the United States.

Fleischer AB, Fleischer SE - Dermatoendocrinol (2016)

These 22 figures relate the relationships between average daily solar radiation and the mortality from the leading types of cancer between 1999 and 2011. Each data point represents an individual US State or the District of Columbia and solar energy is in units of KJ/m2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862378&req=5

f0003: These 22 figures relate the relationships between average daily solar radiation and the mortality from the leading types of cancer between 1999 and 2011. Each data point represents an individual US State or the District of Columbia and solar energy is in units of KJ/m2.
Mentions: Cancer Mortality. We found no association between increasing solar energy and decreasing cancer incidence for all invasive cancers (Fig. 1, p = .12). Associations were demonstrated between increasing solar energy and decreasing cancer incidence for: uterine cancer (Fig. 3, p = .01), esophageal cancer (p < .001), leukemias (p = .002), lung cancer (p < .001), non-Hodgkins lymphoma (p < .001), ovarian cancer (p = .006), and urinary bladder (p < .001).

Bottom Line: We obtained the North America Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) daily average sunlight for the continental United States from 1999-2011.We found that cancer incidence for all invasive cancers and for 11 of 22 leading cancers significantly decreased with increased solar radiation.Cancer mortality for all invasive cancers was not significantly associated with solar radiation, but for 7 of 22 leading cancers, including cancers of the uterus, leukemias, lung, ovary, and urinary bladder, increased solar radiation predicted decreased mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky College of Medicine , Lexington, KY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Invasive cancer risk is inversely related to ultraviolet light exposure. This study explores relationships between cancer and the satellite-derived sunlight energy. We obtained the North America Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) daily average sunlight for the continental United States from 1999-2011. US Cancer Statistics age-adjusted-incidence and mortality was also obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We found that cancer incidence for all invasive cancers and for 11 of 22 leading cancers significantly decreased with increased solar radiation. Cancer mortality for all invasive cancers was not significantly associated with solar radiation, but for 7 of 22 leading cancers, including cancers of the uterus, leukemias, lung, ovary, and urinary bladder, increased solar radiation predicted decreased mortality. With increasing solar radiation, increased incidence and cancer mortality was observed for liver cancer and increased incidence but not mortality was observed for cervical cancer. The current study confirms studies relating UV radiation to the incidence and mortality of a variety of cancer types. We find associations between solar radiation energy and the incidence and mortality of a number of types of cancers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus