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Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo.

He Y, Du Z, Ma S, Liu Y, Li D, Huang H, Jiang S, Cheng S, Wu W, Zhang K, Zheng X - Int J Nanomedicine (2016)

Bottom Line: AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells.The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression.AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Allan H Conney Laboratory for Anticancer Drug Research, School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guandong University of Technology, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of ip administration of AgNPs on the development and growth of H1299 tumors.Notes: (A) Growth curve of H1299 tumors in each group. Each value represents mean ± SE from nine mice. (B) Individual body weight of mice after treatment for 36 days. **P<0.01.Abbreviations: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles; ip, intraperitoneal.
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f7-ijn-11-1879: Effects of ip administration of AgNPs on the development and growth of H1299 tumors.Notes: (A) Growth curve of H1299 tumors in each group. Each value represents mean ± SE from nine mice. (B) Individual body weight of mice after treatment for 36 days. **P<0.01.Abbreviations: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles; ip, intraperitoneal.

Mentions: SCID mice received ip injections of AgNPs or vehicle daily 2 weeks (Figure 6) or 24 hours (Figure 7) after the inoculation of lung cancer H1299 cells. As shown in Figure 6, the average tumor size was similar in each group at the start of the experiment. The percentage of initial tumor size at 28 days was 8.78±0.42 and 6.01±0.49 (mean ± SE) for the vehicle group and the AgNPs-treated group, respectively. The percentage of initial body weight at 28 days was 96.5%±2.5% and 93.4%±2.2% for the control and the AgNPs group, respectively. Statistical analysis using Mann–Whitney test demonstrated the percentage of initial tumor size was significantly lower in the AgNPs-treated group compared with the control group at 28 days (P=0.0104). After the injection of AgNPs, the development of lung tumors was slower than that of the control group, and the tumor size decreased noticeably on day 28. The changes in body weight were similar for all the groups. As described in Figure 7, statistical analysis using ANOVA showed that the tumor size of AgNPs-treated group after 36 days was significantly smaller than that of the control (P=0.0068) group. Tumor size in mice after 36 days of treatment was 1.13±0.21 mm2 for the control group and 0.49±0.07 mm2 for the AgNPs-treated group. The study displayed that the AgNPs had a strong effect in slowing down the lung tumor growth compared with the control group. The percentage of initial body weight after 36 days was 100.2% ±1.0% and 98.7% ±0.9% for the vehicle group and the AgNPs group, respectively. The differences in the percentage of initial body weight were not statistically significant between the two groups. In this study, we have shown that ip injection of AgNPs had a significant difference in preventing the tumor growth as opposed to the control group, which implied that AgNPs exhibited anticancer effects against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in vivo. Further researches should be carried out for the potential use of AgNPs in the treatment of NSCLCs.


Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo.

He Y, Du Z, Ma S, Liu Y, Li D, Huang H, Jiang S, Cheng S, Wu W, Zhang K, Zheng X - Int J Nanomedicine (2016)

Effects of ip administration of AgNPs on the development and growth of H1299 tumors.Notes: (A) Growth curve of H1299 tumors in each group. Each value represents mean ± SE from nine mice. (B) Individual body weight of mice after treatment for 36 days. **P<0.01.Abbreviations: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles; ip, intraperitoneal.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862350&req=5

f7-ijn-11-1879: Effects of ip administration of AgNPs on the development and growth of H1299 tumors.Notes: (A) Growth curve of H1299 tumors in each group. Each value represents mean ± SE from nine mice. (B) Individual body weight of mice after treatment for 36 days. **P<0.01.Abbreviations: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles; ip, intraperitoneal.
Mentions: SCID mice received ip injections of AgNPs or vehicle daily 2 weeks (Figure 6) or 24 hours (Figure 7) after the inoculation of lung cancer H1299 cells. As shown in Figure 6, the average tumor size was similar in each group at the start of the experiment. The percentage of initial tumor size at 28 days was 8.78±0.42 and 6.01±0.49 (mean ± SE) for the vehicle group and the AgNPs-treated group, respectively. The percentage of initial body weight at 28 days was 96.5%±2.5% and 93.4%±2.2% for the control and the AgNPs group, respectively. Statistical analysis using Mann–Whitney test demonstrated the percentage of initial tumor size was significantly lower in the AgNPs-treated group compared with the control group at 28 days (P=0.0104). After the injection of AgNPs, the development of lung tumors was slower than that of the control group, and the tumor size decreased noticeably on day 28. The changes in body weight were similar for all the groups. As described in Figure 7, statistical analysis using ANOVA showed that the tumor size of AgNPs-treated group after 36 days was significantly smaller than that of the control (P=0.0068) group. Tumor size in mice after 36 days of treatment was 1.13±0.21 mm2 for the control group and 0.49±0.07 mm2 for the AgNPs-treated group. The study displayed that the AgNPs had a strong effect in slowing down the lung tumor growth compared with the control group. The percentage of initial body weight after 36 days was 100.2% ±1.0% and 98.7% ±0.9% for the vehicle group and the AgNPs group, respectively. The differences in the percentage of initial body weight were not statistically significant between the two groups. In this study, we have shown that ip injection of AgNPs had a significant difference in preventing the tumor growth as opposed to the control group, which implied that AgNPs exhibited anticancer effects against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in vivo. Further researches should be carried out for the potential use of AgNPs in the treatment of NSCLCs.

Bottom Line: AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells.The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression.AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Allan H Conney Laboratory for Anticancer Drug Research, School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guandong University of Technology, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus