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Is older adult care mediated by caregivers' cultural stereotypes? The role of competence and warmth attribution.

Fernández-Ballesteros R, Bustillos A, Santacreu M, Schettini R, Díaz-Veiga P, Huici C - Clin Interv Aging (2016)

Bottom Line: Caregivers' cultural views of older adults (compared to young people) are characterized by low competence and high warmth, replicating the data obtained elsewhere from the SCM.Most importantly, the person-centered units predict better staff performance and better resident functioning than standard units.Moreover, cultural stereotyping of older adult competence moderates the effects of staff performance on resident functioning, in line with the findings of previous research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical and Health Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), Spain.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine, from the stereotype content model (SCM) perspective, the role of the competence and warmth stereotypes of older adults held by professional caregivers.

Methods: A quasi-experimental design, ex post facto with observational analyses, was used in this study. The cultural view on competence and warmth was assessed in 100 caregivers working in a set of six residential geriatric care units (three of them organized following a person-centered care approach and the other three providing standard geriatric care). In order to assess caregivers' cultural stereotypical views, the SCM questionnaire was administered. To evaluate the role of caregivers' cultural stereotypes in their professional performance as well as in older adult functioning, two observational scales from the Sistema de Evaluación de Residencias de Ancianos (assessment system for older adults residences)-RS (staff functioning and residents' functioning) were applied.

Results: Caregivers' cultural views of older adults (compared to young people) are characterized by low competence and high warmth, replicating the data obtained elsewhere from the SCM. Most importantly, the person-centered units predict better staff performance and better resident functioning than standard units. Moreover, cultural stereotyping of older adult competence moderates the effects of staff performance on resident functioning, in line with the findings of previous research.

Conclusion: Our results underline the influence of caregivers' cultural stereotypes on the type of care, as well as on their professional behaviors and on older adult functioning. Caregivers' cultural stereotypes could be considered as a central issue in older adult care since they mediate the triangle of care: caregivers/older adults/type of care; therefore, much more attention should be paid to this psychosocial care component.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Moderation effect of the competence dimension and staff functioning on resident functioning.Abbreviation: SD, standard deviation.
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f3-cia-11-545: Moderation effect of the competence dimension and staff functioning on resident functioning.Abbreviation: SD, standard deviation.

Mentions: The analysis that takes into account the competence dimension as moderator of the relationship between staff and resident functioning shows a good fit of the model to the data (R2=0.66, F=46.80, P<0.0001). The PCC type of care shows a significant effect on resident functioning (β=0.43, t=5.36, P<0.0001), similar to that found in the previous mediational analysis where staff functioning controls the effect of the experimental treatment (Figure 3). The competence dimension also has a significant effect on resident functioning (β=−0.25, t=2.42, P<0.02). Staff functioning does not show significant effects on resident functioning (β=−0.21, t=1.01, ns), but an interaction effect emerged between staff functioning and attribution of competence to older adults (β=0.12, t=2.40, P<0.02). In other words, cultural perception of older adult competence is not affected by the type of care but moderates the effects of staff functioning on resident functioning. These data are shown in Figure 3.


Is older adult care mediated by caregivers' cultural stereotypes? The role of competence and warmth attribution.

Fernández-Ballesteros R, Bustillos A, Santacreu M, Schettini R, Díaz-Veiga P, Huici C - Clin Interv Aging (2016)

Moderation effect of the competence dimension and staff functioning on resident functioning.Abbreviation: SD, standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862347&req=5

f3-cia-11-545: Moderation effect of the competence dimension and staff functioning on resident functioning.Abbreviation: SD, standard deviation.
Mentions: The analysis that takes into account the competence dimension as moderator of the relationship between staff and resident functioning shows a good fit of the model to the data (R2=0.66, F=46.80, P<0.0001). The PCC type of care shows a significant effect on resident functioning (β=0.43, t=5.36, P<0.0001), similar to that found in the previous mediational analysis where staff functioning controls the effect of the experimental treatment (Figure 3). The competence dimension also has a significant effect on resident functioning (β=−0.25, t=2.42, P<0.02). Staff functioning does not show significant effects on resident functioning (β=−0.21, t=1.01, ns), but an interaction effect emerged between staff functioning and attribution of competence to older adults (β=0.12, t=2.40, P<0.02). In other words, cultural perception of older adult competence is not affected by the type of care but moderates the effects of staff functioning on resident functioning. These data are shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Caregivers' cultural views of older adults (compared to young people) are characterized by low competence and high warmth, replicating the data obtained elsewhere from the SCM.Most importantly, the person-centered units predict better staff performance and better resident functioning than standard units.Moreover, cultural stereotyping of older adult competence moderates the effects of staff performance on resident functioning, in line with the findings of previous research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical and Health Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), Spain.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine, from the stereotype content model (SCM) perspective, the role of the competence and warmth stereotypes of older adults held by professional caregivers.

Methods: A quasi-experimental design, ex post facto with observational analyses, was used in this study. The cultural view on competence and warmth was assessed in 100 caregivers working in a set of six residential geriatric care units (three of them organized following a person-centered care approach and the other three providing standard geriatric care). In order to assess caregivers' cultural stereotypical views, the SCM questionnaire was administered. To evaluate the role of caregivers' cultural stereotypes in their professional performance as well as in older adult functioning, two observational scales from the Sistema de Evaluación de Residencias de Ancianos (assessment system for older adults residences)-RS (staff functioning and residents' functioning) were applied.

Results: Caregivers' cultural views of older adults (compared to young people) are characterized by low competence and high warmth, replicating the data obtained elsewhere from the SCM. Most importantly, the person-centered units predict better staff performance and better resident functioning than standard units. Moreover, cultural stereotyping of older adult competence moderates the effects of staff performance on resident functioning, in line with the findings of previous research.

Conclusion: Our results underline the influence of caregivers' cultural stereotypes on the type of care, as well as on their professional behaviors and on older adult functioning. Caregivers' cultural stereotypes could be considered as a central issue in older adult care since they mediate the triangle of care: caregivers/older adults/type of care; therefore, much more attention should be paid to this psychosocial care component.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus