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Sliding of centrosome-unattached microtubules defines key features of neuronal phenotype

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ABSTRACT

Rao et al. show that during migration, neurons contain a small population of centrosome-unattached microtubules in the leading process that are capable of sliding. Increasing the proportion of centrosome-unattached microtubules alters neuronal morphology, migration path, and microtubule behavior in the leading process.

No MeSH data available.


ET analysis of MT organization in the centrosomal region of a migrating cerebellar granule neuron. (A) A selected tomographic slice showing MTs (arrowheads), the centrioles (C), and a portion of the nucleus (N). The black arrow indicates the direction of migration. (B) Corresponding 3D model showing the centrioles (blue cylinders), the MTs (green lines), and the nucleus (gray). (C) Model indicating distribution of MT minus ends (magenta spheres) and MT plus ends (turquoise spheres). Bar, 1 µm. (D–F) Quantification of the distribution of MT minus ends with respect to the centrosome as identified by ET of three different migratory neurons. See also Fig. S1.
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fig1: ET analysis of MT organization in the centrosomal region of a migrating cerebellar granule neuron. (A) A selected tomographic slice showing MTs (arrowheads), the centrioles (C), and a portion of the nucleus (N). The black arrow indicates the direction of migration. (B) Corresponding 3D model showing the centrioles (blue cylinders), the MTs (green lines), and the nucleus (gray). (C) Model indicating distribution of MT minus ends (magenta spheres) and MT plus ends (turquoise spheres). Bar, 1 µm. (D–F) Quantification of the distribution of MT minus ends with respect to the centrosome as identified by ET of three different migratory neurons. See also Fig. S1.

Mentions: In the first neuron (Fig. 1 A), the centrosome (Fig. 1 A, "C"), a portion of the nucleus (Fig. 1 A, "N"), and MTs (Fig. 1 A, arrowheads) are visible in the selected tomographic section. 75 MTs were found in the analyzed region of this neuron (Fig. 1 B, green lines). Of the 75, minus ends of 35 MTs were present within the analyzed volume (Fig. 1 C, magenta spheres). Of the 35 ends, 27 were within 1 µm from the centrosome (Fig. 1, B and C, blue cylinders represent centrosome) and were considered attached to the centrosome, whereas the remaining eight ends, which were farther away, were considered to be unattached (Fig. 1 E, quantification). Some of the MTs extended behind the centrosome, instead of converging, and are stretched around the nucleus (Fig. 1 B). In this particular reconstruction, four MT plus ends were identified (Fig. 1 C, turquoise spheres).


Sliding of centrosome-unattached microtubules defines key features of neuronal phenotype
ET analysis of MT organization in the centrosomal region of a migrating cerebellar granule neuron. (A) A selected tomographic slice showing MTs (arrowheads), the centrioles (C), and a portion of the nucleus (N). The black arrow indicates the direction of migration. (B) Corresponding 3D model showing the centrioles (blue cylinders), the MTs (green lines), and the nucleus (gray). (C) Model indicating distribution of MT minus ends (magenta spheres) and MT plus ends (turquoise spheres). Bar, 1 µm. (D–F) Quantification of the distribution of MT minus ends with respect to the centrosome as identified by ET of three different migratory neurons. See also Fig. S1.
© Copyright Policy - openaccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862329&req=5

fig1: ET analysis of MT organization in the centrosomal region of a migrating cerebellar granule neuron. (A) A selected tomographic slice showing MTs (arrowheads), the centrioles (C), and a portion of the nucleus (N). The black arrow indicates the direction of migration. (B) Corresponding 3D model showing the centrioles (blue cylinders), the MTs (green lines), and the nucleus (gray). (C) Model indicating distribution of MT minus ends (magenta spheres) and MT plus ends (turquoise spheres). Bar, 1 µm. (D–F) Quantification of the distribution of MT minus ends with respect to the centrosome as identified by ET of three different migratory neurons. See also Fig. S1.
Mentions: In the first neuron (Fig. 1 A), the centrosome (Fig. 1 A, "C"), a portion of the nucleus (Fig. 1 A, "N"), and MTs (Fig. 1 A, arrowheads) are visible in the selected tomographic section. 75 MTs were found in the analyzed region of this neuron (Fig. 1 B, green lines). Of the 75, minus ends of 35 MTs were present within the analyzed volume (Fig. 1 C, magenta spheres). Of the 35 ends, 27 were within 1 µm from the centrosome (Fig. 1, B and C, blue cylinders represent centrosome) and were considered attached to the centrosome, whereas the remaining eight ends, which were farther away, were considered to be unattached (Fig. 1 E, quantification). Some of the MTs extended behind the centrosome, instead of converging, and are stretched around the nucleus (Fig. 1 B). In this particular reconstruction, four MT plus ends were identified (Fig. 1 C, turquoise spheres).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rao et al. show that during migration, neurons contain a small population of centrosome-unattached microtubules in the leading process that are capable of sliding. Increasing the proportion of centrosome-unattached microtubules alters neuronal morphology, migration path, and microtubule behavior in the leading process.

No MeSH data available.