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Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians.

Gupta P, Sodhi KS, Saxena AK, Khandelwal N, Singhi P - J Pediatr Neurosci (2016 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage.Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation.Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

ABSTRACT
Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Variants (a) coronal high resolution ultrasound image demonstrates the cavum septum pellucidum seen as a midline cyst between the frontal horns of lateral ventricles. (b) Two high resolution sagittal images (both sides) shows multiple cysts parallel to the lateral ventricle suggestive of connatal cysts. (c) Coronal image reveals left choroid plexus cyst. Also noted is communicating hydrocephalus
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Figure 4: Variants (a) coronal high resolution ultrasound image demonstrates the cavum septum pellucidum seen as a midline cyst between the frontal horns of lateral ventricles. (b) Two high resolution sagittal images (both sides) shows multiple cysts parallel to the lateral ventricle suggestive of connatal cysts. (c) Coronal image reveals left choroid plexus cyst. Also noted is communicating hydrocephalus

Mentions: During fetal life, there is a single continuous cystic structure in the midline of SP. The part anterior to the foramen of Monro is called CSP [Figure 4a] and the one posterior to it is cavum vergae. The closure of this structure occurs from back to front, starting at 6 months of gestation. At full term, no cystic component is noted in posterior part 97% of infants, so that there is only a CSP at birth.[8] Even this disappears by 3–6 months of age, however sometimes; the CSP may persist into adulthood.


Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians.

Gupta P, Sodhi KS, Saxena AK, Khandelwal N, Singhi P - J Pediatr Neurosci (2016 Jan-Mar)

Variants (a) coronal high resolution ultrasound image demonstrates the cavum septum pellucidum seen as a midline cyst between the frontal horns of lateral ventricles. (b) Two high resolution sagittal images (both sides) shows multiple cysts parallel to the lateral ventricle suggestive of connatal cysts. (c) Coronal image reveals left choroid plexus cyst. Also noted is communicating hydrocephalus
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862295&req=5

Figure 4: Variants (a) coronal high resolution ultrasound image demonstrates the cavum septum pellucidum seen as a midline cyst between the frontal horns of lateral ventricles. (b) Two high resolution sagittal images (both sides) shows multiple cysts parallel to the lateral ventricle suggestive of connatal cysts. (c) Coronal image reveals left choroid plexus cyst. Also noted is communicating hydrocephalus
Mentions: During fetal life, there is a single continuous cystic structure in the midline of SP. The part anterior to the foramen of Monro is called CSP [Figure 4a] and the one posterior to it is cavum vergae. The closure of this structure occurs from back to front, starting at 6 months of gestation. At full term, no cystic component is noted in posterior part 97% of infants, so that there is only a CSP at birth.[8] Even this disappears by 3–6 months of age, however sometimes; the CSP may persist into adulthood.

Bottom Line: Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage.Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation.Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

ABSTRACT
Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus