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A rare case of phaeohyphomycosis caused by Fonsecaea pedrosoi in a child with nephrotic syndrome.

Nayyar C, Gulati N, Sherwal BL - Indian J Nephrol (2016 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: A high level of suspicion and routine fungal cultures are required to identify these cases.There is no consensus regarding their management.Here, an unusual presentation of phaeohyphomycosis (secondary to Fonsecaea pedrosoi) presenting as a disseminated infection in a case of nephrotic syndrome is described.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Dematiaceous fungi are the etiological agents of phaeohyphomycosis and are now increasingly being recognized for causing disease in humans. A high level of suspicion and routine fungal cultures are required to identify these cases. There is no consensus regarding their management. Here, an unusual presentation of phaeohyphomycosis (secondary to Fonsecaea pedrosoi) presenting as a disseminated infection in a case of nephrotic syndrome is described.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lactophenol cotton blue mount of Fonsecaea pedrosoi showing thin septate hyphe and short chains of conidia
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Figure 1: Lactophenol cotton blue mount of Fonsecaea pedrosoi showing thin septate hyphe and short chains of conidia

Mentions: Direct examination of both the pleural and ascitic aspirate showed the presence of elongated septate pigmented hyphae. The aspirates were cultured on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar with gentamicin and chloramphenicol at 25°C, and after 2 weeks of incubation flat to dome-shaped colonies were seen to grow in both the aspirates. The colonies were dark olive gray to velvety with black reverse and developed radial grooves and a central elevation later. Slide culture revealed light brown septate hyphae and pale to brown conidiophores. Conidiogenous cells were arranged in loose branches showing sympodial arrangement with prominent denticles. Conidia were arranged singly and in short chains. The fungus was identified as F. pedrosoi [Figure 1].


A rare case of phaeohyphomycosis caused by Fonsecaea pedrosoi in a child with nephrotic syndrome.

Nayyar C, Gulati N, Sherwal BL - Indian J Nephrol (2016 May-Jun)

Lactophenol cotton blue mount of Fonsecaea pedrosoi showing thin septate hyphe and short chains of conidia
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862271&req=5

Figure 1: Lactophenol cotton blue mount of Fonsecaea pedrosoi showing thin septate hyphe and short chains of conidia
Mentions: Direct examination of both the pleural and ascitic aspirate showed the presence of elongated septate pigmented hyphae. The aspirates were cultured on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar with gentamicin and chloramphenicol at 25°C, and after 2 weeks of incubation flat to dome-shaped colonies were seen to grow in both the aspirates. The colonies were dark olive gray to velvety with black reverse and developed radial grooves and a central elevation later. Slide culture revealed light brown septate hyphae and pale to brown conidiophores. Conidiogenous cells were arranged in loose branches showing sympodial arrangement with prominent denticles. Conidia were arranged singly and in short chains. The fungus was identified as F. pedrosoi [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: A high level of suspicion and routine fungal cultures are required to identify these cases.There is no consensus regarding their management.Here, an unusual presentation of phaeohyphomycosis (secondary to Fonsecaea pedrosoi) presenting as a disseminated infection in a case of nephrotic syndrome is described.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Dematiaceous fungi are the etiological agents of phaeohyphomycosis and are now increasingly being recognized for causing disease in humans. A high level of suspicion and routine fungal cultures are required to identify these cases. There is no consensus regarding their management. Here, an unusual presentation of phaeohyphomycosis (secondary to Fonsecaea pedrosoi) presenting as a disseminated infection in a case of nephrotic syndrome is described.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus