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Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning.

Dhanapriya J, Gopalakrishnan N, Arun V, Dineshkumar T, Sakthirajan R, Balasubramaniyan T, Haris M - Indian J Nephrol (2016 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis.Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride.His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Madras Medical College and Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Renal biopsy showing acute tubular injury (H and E)
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Figure 1: Renal biopsy showing acute tubular injury (H and E)

Mentions: He was treated with hemodialysis, fresh frozen plasma transfusion, and supportive measures. His coagulopathy improved after 5 days. He received eight sessions of hemodialysis over 2 weeks after which his urine output started improving. Renal biopsy done 2 weeks after admission showed markedly dilated tubules with sloughed off epithelium and cell debris within lumen [Figure 1], interstitial edema, and mild inflammatory infiltrate in the interstitium consistent with acute tubular necrosis. Glomeruli and vasculature were normal. Consumed substance brought by the patient 3 weeks later was white colored powder, called “VEERAM” in local language. Toxicological analysis of the compound revealed it to be mercuric chloride. At the end of 2 months, his serum creatinine was 1 mg/dl.


Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning.

Dhanapriya J, Gopalakrishnan N, Arun V, Dineshkumar T, Sakthirajan R, Balasubramaniyan T, Haris M - Indian J Nephrol (2016 May-Jun)

Renal biopsy showing acute tubular injury (H and E)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862267&req=5

Figure 1: Renal biopsy showing acute tubular injury (H and E)
Mentions: He was treated with hemodialysis, fresh frozen plasma transfusion, and supportive measures. His coagulopathy improved after 5 days. He received eight sessions of hemodialysis over 2 weeks after which his urine output started improving. Renal biopsy done 2 weeks after admission showed markedly dilated tubules with sloughed off epithelium and cell debris within lumen [Figure 1], interstitial edema, and mild inflammatory infiltrate in the interstitium consistent with acute tubular necrosis. Glomeruli and vasculature were normal. Consumed substance brought by the patient 3 weeks later was white colored powder, called “VEERAM” in local language. Toxicological analysis of the compound revealed it to be mercuric chloride. At the end of 2 months, his serum creatinine was 1 mg/dl.

Bottom Line: Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis.Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride.His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Madras Medical College and Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus