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A Questionnaire Survey of the Type of Support Required by Yogo Teachers to Effectively Manage Students Suspected of Having an Eating Disorder.

Seike K, Hanazawa H, Ohtani T, Takamiya S, Sakuta R, Nakazato M - Biopsychosoc Med (2016)

Bottom Line: The encounter rates and the kinds of requested were obtained and compared, taking their confidence intervals into consideration.Special needs schools had the highest rate for Others.We found that the encounter rate of AN was the highest, and that it is effective to offer "a list of medical/consultation institutions" to junior and senior high schools where the encounter rates for AN are high.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, 2 Yamadaoka Suita-city, Osaka, Prefecture 565-0871 Japan ; Research Center for Child Mental Development Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba Prefecture 260-8670 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many studies have focused on the decreasing age of onset of eating disorders (EDs). Because school-age children with EDs are likely to suffer worse physical effects than adults, early detection and appropriate support are important. The cooperation of Yogo teachers is essential in helping these students to find appropriate care. To assist Yogo teachers, it is helpful to clarify the encounter rates (the proportion of Yogo teachers who have encountered ED students) and kinds of requested support (which Yogo teachers felt necessary to support ED students). There are no studies that have surveyed the prevalence rates of ED children by ED type as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), nor were we able to find any quantitative study surveying the kinds of support Yogo teachers feel helpful to support ED students.

Methods: A questionnaire survey was administered to 655 Yogo teachers working at elementary/junior high/senior high/special needs schools in Chiba Prefecture. The questionnaire asked if the respondents had encountered students with each of the ED types described in DSM-5 (anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), and other types of EDs (Others)), and the kinds of support they felt necessary to support these students. The encounter rates and the kinds of requested were obtained and compared, taking their confidence intervals into consideration.

Results: The encounter rates for AN, BN, BED, ARFID, and Others were 48.4, 14.0, 8.4, 10.7, and 4.6 %, respectively. When classified by school type, AN, BN, BED, and ARFID had their highest encounter rates in senior high schools. Special needs schools had the highest rate for Others. The support most required for all ED types was "a list of medical/consultation institutions."

Conclusions: Our results have clarified how to support Yogo teachers in the early detection and support of ED students. We found that the encounter rate of AN was the highest, and that it is effective to offer "a list of medical/consultation institutions" to junior and senior high schools where the encounter rates for AN are high.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Encounter Rates by ED Type
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Fig1: Encounter Rates by ED Type

Mentions: Table 3 and Fig. 1 show encounter rates by ED type. With all school types combined, the rate of AN was highest at 48.4 %, followed by BN at 14.0 %, and then ARFID, BED and Others at 10.7, 8.4, and 4.6 %, respectively. Note that the order of BN > ARFID may be switched as their CIs overlapped (the CIs of BN and ARFID were 11.4 ~ 16.7 and 8.3 ~ 13.1 %, respectively).Table 3


A Questionnaire Survey of the Type of Support Required by Yogo Teachers to Effectively Manage Students Suspected of Having an Eating Disorder.

Seike K, Hanazawa H, Ohtani T, Takamiya S, Sakuta R, Nakazato M - Biopsychosoc Med (2016)

Encounter Rates by ED Type
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862230&req=5

Fig1: Encounter Rates by ED Type
Mentions: Table 3 and Fig. 1 show encounter rates by ED type. With all school types combined, the rate of AN was highest at 48.4 %, followed by BN at 14.0 %, and then ARFID, BED and Others at 10.7, 8.4, and 4.6 %, respectively. Note that the order of BN > ARFID may be switched as their CIs overlapped (the CIs of BN and ARFID were 11.4 ~ 16.7 and 8.3 ~ 13.1 %, respectively).Table 3

Bottom Line: The encounter rates and the kinds of requested were obtained and compared, taking their confidence intervals into consideration.Special needs schools had the highest rate for Others.We found that the encounter rate of AN was the highest, and that it is effective to offer "a list of medical/consultation institutions" to junior and senior high schools where the encounter rates for AN are high.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, 2 Yamadaoka Suita-city, Osaka, Prefecture 565-0871 Japan ; Research Center for Child Mental Development Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba Prefecture 260-8670 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many studies have focused on the decreasing age of onset of eating disorders (EDs). Because school-age children with EDs are likely to suffer worse physical effects than adults, early detection and appropriate support are important. The cooperation of Yogo teachers is essential in helping these students to find appropriate care. To assist Yogo teachers, it is helpful to clarify the encounter rates (the proportion of Yogo teachers who have encountered ED students) and kinds of requested support (which Yogo teachers felt necessary to support ED students). There are no studies that have surveyed the prevalence rates of ED children by ED type as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), nor were we able to find any quantitative study surveying the kinds of support Yogo teachers feel helpful to support ED students.

Methods: A questionnaire survey was administered to 655 Yogo teachers working at elementary/junior high/senior high/special needs schools in Chiba Prefecture. The questionnaire asked if the respondents had encountered students with each of the ED types described in DSM-5 (anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), and other types of EDs (Others)), and the kinds of support they felt necessary to support these students. The encounter rates and the kinds of requested were obtained and compared, taking their confidence intervals into consideration.

Results: The encounter rates for AN, BN, BED, ARFID, and Others were 48.4, 14.0, 8.4, 10.7, and 4.6 %, respectively. When classified by school type, AN, BN, BED, and ARFID had their highest encounter rates in senior high schools. Special needs schools had the highest rate for Others. The support most required for all ED types was "a list of medical/consultation institutions."

Conclusions: Our results have clarified how to support Yogo teachers in the early detection and support of ED students. We found that the encounter rate of AN was the highest, and that it is effective to offer "a list of medical/consultation institutions" to junior and senior high schools where the encounter rates for AN are high.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus