Limits...
Pediatric spinal glioblastoma of the conus medullaris: a case report of long survival.

Cacchione A, Mastronuzzi A, Cefalo MG, Colafati GS, Diomedi-Camassei F, Rizzi M, De Benedictis A, Carai A - Chin J Cancer (2016)

Bottom Line: These tumors are associated with severe disability and poor prognosis.We describe the peculiar characteristics of this rare condition in pediatric oncology.We also provide an overview of current multidisciplinary therapeutic approaches and prognostic factors for this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165, Rome, Italy. antonella.cacchione@opbg.net.

ABSTRACT
High-grade gliomas of the spinal cord represent a rare entity in children. Their biology, behavior, and controversial treatment options have been discussed in a few pediatric cases. These tumors are associated with severe disability and poor prognosis. We report a case of a 4-year-old child diagnosed with an isolated glioblastoma multiforme of the conus medullaris. The patient underwent subtotal surgical excision, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and oral chemotherapy. He is alive with mild neurologic deficits at 52 months after diagnosis. We describe the peculiar characteristics of this rare condition in pediatric oncology. We also provide an overview of current multidisciplinary therapeutic approaches and prognostic factors for this disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histopatologic features of the spinal GBM of the conus medullaris. Microscopy demonstrates a neoplastic proliferation of polymorphous glial cells characterized by anisocaryosis and atypical mitosis. a Focal necrosis, calcifications, and areas with multinucleated cells are present (×40). b Immunohistochemistry shows positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100 and negativity for sinaptofisine, neurofilaments, and the epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) (×63). c The proliferation index (anti-Ki67) is 15% (×63)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862181&req=5

Fig3: Histopatologic features of the spinal GBM of the conus medullaris. Microscopy demonstrates a neoplastic proliferation of polymorphous glial cells characterized by anisocaryosis and atypical mitosis. a Focal necrosis, calcifications, and areas with multinucleated cells are present (×40). b Immunohistochemistry shows positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100 and negativity for sinaptofisine, neurofilaments, and the epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) (×63). c The proliferation index (anti-Ki67) is 15% (×63)

Mentions: Microsurgical subtotal excision was performed with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. After opening the dura, a brownish-red, highly vascularized solid mass appeared. At the end of the procedure, the excision appeared to be subtotal, as confirmed by postoperative MRI (Fig. 2a, b). The patient’s clinical status worsened after surgery, with worse paraparesis on the right side. Hypoesthesia with a D11 level and urinary incontinence were also observed. Pathology was suggestive of GBM (Fig. 3).Fig. 2


Pediatric spinal glioblastoma of the conus medullaris: a case report of long survival.

Cacchione A, Mastronuzzi A, Cefalo MG, Colafati GS, Diomedi-Camassei F, Rizzi M, De Benedictis A, Carai A - Chin J Cancer (2016)

Histopatologic features of the spinal GBM of the conus medullaris. Microscopy demonstrates a neoplastic proliferation of polymorphous glial cells characterized by anisocaryosis and atypical mitosis. a Focal necrosis, calcifications, and areas with multinucleated cells are present (×40). b Immunohistochemistry shows positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100 and negativity for sinaptofisine, neurofilaments, and the epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) (×63). c The proliferation index (anti-Ki67) is 15% (×63)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862181&req=5

Fig3: Histopatologic features of the spinal GBM of the conus medullaris. Microscopy demonstrates a neoplastic proliferation of polymorphous glial cells characterized by anisocaryosis and atypical mitosis. a Focal necrosis, calcifications, and areas with multinucleated cells are present (×40). b Immunohistochemistry shows positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100 and negativity for sinaptofisine, neurofilaments, and the epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) (×63). c The proliferation index (anti-Ki67) is 15% (×63)
Mentions: Microsurgical subtotal excision was performed with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. After opening the dura, a brownish-red, highly vascularized solid mass appeared. At the end of the procedure, the excision appeared to be subtotal, as confirmed by postoperative MRI (Fig. 2a, b). The patient’s clinical status worsened after surgery, with worse paraparesis on the right side. Hypoesthesia with a D11 level and urinary incontinence were also observed. Pathology was suggestive of GBM (Fig. 3).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: These tumors are associated with severe disability and poor prognosis.We describe the peculiar characteristics of this rare condition in pediatric oncology.We also provide an overview of current multidisciplinary therapeutic approaches and prognostic factors for this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165, Rome, Italy. antonella.cacchione@opbg.net.

ABSTRACT
High-grade gliomas of the spinal cord represent a rare entity in children. Their biology, behavior, and controversial treatment options have been discussed in a few pediatric cases. These tumors are associated with severe disability and poor prognosis. We report a case of a 4-year-old child diagnosed with an isolated glioblastoma multiforme of the conus medullaris. The patient underwent subtotal surgical excision, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and oral chemotherapy. He is alive with mild neurologic deficits at 52 months after diagnosis. We describe the peculiar characteristics of this rare condition in pediatric oncology. We also provide an overview of current multidisciplinary therapeutic approaches and prognostic factors for this disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus