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Molecular detection of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa in cervids and wild boars from Portugal.

Pereira A, Parreira R, Nunes M, Casadinho A, Vieira ML, Campino L, Maia C - Parasit Vectors (2016)

Bottom Line: DNA was detected in 33 (43.4 %) cervids (31 red deer and two fallow deer) and in two (3.1 %) wild boars while Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 %) wild boar blood samples.Anaplasma spp./Theileria spp. mixed infections were found in 17 cervids (22.4 %) and in two wild boars (3.1 %).Further studies concerning the potential pathogenicity of the different species of  Anaplasma and Theileria infecting wild ungulates, the identification of their vector range, and their putative infectivity to domestic livestock and humans should be undertaken.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Lisbon, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: Wildlife can act as reservoir of different tick-borne pathogens, such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa with veterinary and zoonotic importance in cervids and wild boars from the Centre and South of Portugal.

Methods: One hundred and forty one blood samples from free-ranging ungulates including 73 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 65 wild boars (Sus scrofa) and three fallow deer (Dama dama) were tested for the presence of Anaplasma marginale/A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp., Babesia/Theileria spp., Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) (s.l.), and Rickettsia spp. DNA by PCR.

Results: Anaplasma spp. DNA was detected in 33 (43.4 %) cervids (31 red deer and two fallow deer) and in two (3.1 %) wild boars while Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 %) wild boar blood samples. Sequence analysis of msp4 sequences identified A. marginale, A. ovis, while the analysis of rDNA sequence data disclosed the presence of A. platys and A. phagocytophilum and T. capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3. Anaplasma spp./Theileria spp. mixed infections were found in 17 cervids (22.4 %) and in two wild boars (3.1 %). All samples were negative for Babesia sp., B. burgdorferi (s.l.), Ehrlichia sp. or Rickettsia sp.

Conclusions: This is the first detection of Anaplasma marginale, A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, A. platys, Theileria capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3 in cervids and wild boars from Portugal. Further studies concerning the potential pathogenicity of the different species of  Anaplasma and Theileria infecting wild ungulates, the identification of their vector range, and their putative infectivity to domestic livestock and humans should be undertaken.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree of Theileria spp. based on 18S rRNA gene sequences
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Fig2: Phylogenetic tree of Theileria spp. based on 18S rRNA gene sequences

Mentions: PCR reactions prepared using either groEL or A. phagocytophilum species-specific primers revealed reproducibly negative amplification results. On the contrary, Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 % CI: 33.3–56.6 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 % CI: 1.0–12.9 %) wild boar samples, using primers targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Blast analysis showed that the sequences obtained from red deer (accession numbers: LC131069-100) and wild boars (LC131101-3) presented 98–99 % identity to T. capreoli (KJ188207-8) described in Sika deer from China [32] while the two sequences obtained from fallow deer (LC131067-8) showed a high identity (98–99 %) to the Theileria sp. OT3 (Genbank: KF470868) described in sheep from China [33]. The phylogenetical analysis of the obtained 18S rDNA sequences along with the related sequences from GenBank corroborated the Blast identification (Fig. 2).Fig. 2


Molecular detection of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa in cervids and wild boars from Portugal.

Pereira A, Parreira R, Nunes M, Casadinho A, Vieira ML, Campino L, Maia C - Parasit Vectors (2016)

Phylogenetic tree of Theileria spp. based on 18S rRNA gene sequences
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862153&req=5

Fig2: Phylogenetic tree of Theileria spp. based on 18S rRNA gene sequences
Mentions: PCR reactions prepared using either groEL or A. phagocytophilum species-specific primers revealed reproducibly negative amplification results. On the contrary, Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 % CI: 33.3–56.6 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 % CI: 1.0–12.9 %) wild boar samples, using primers targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Blast analysis showed that the sequences obtained from red deer (accession numbers: LC131069-100) and wild boars (LC131101-3) presented 98–99 % identity to T. capreoli (KJ188207-8) described in Sika deer from China [32] while the two sequences obtained from fallow deer (LC131067-8) showed a high identity (98–99 %) to the Theileria sp. OT3 (Genbank: KF470868) described in sheep from China [33]. The phylogenetical analysis of the obtained 18S rDNA sequences along with the related sequences from GenBank corroborated the Blast identification (Fig. 2).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: DNA was detected in 33 (43.4 %) cervids (31 red deer and two fallow deer) and in two (3.1 %) wild boars while Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 %) wild boar blood samples.Anaplasma spp./Theileria spp. mixed infections were found in 17 cervids (22.4 %) and in two wild boars (3.1 %).Further studies concerning the potential pathogenicity of the different species of  Anaplasma and Theileria infecting wild ungulates, the identification of their vector range, and their putative infectivity to domestic livestock and humans should be undertaken.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Lisbon, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: Wildlife can act as reservoir of different tick-borne pathogens, such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa with veterinary and zoonotic importance in cervids and wild boars from the Centre and South of Portugal.

Methods: One hundred and forty one blood samples from free-ranging ungulates including 73 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 65 wild boars (Sus scrofa) and three fallow deer (Dama dama) were tested for the presence of Anaplasma marginale/A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp., Babesia/Theileria spp., Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) (s.l.), and Rickettsia spp. DNA by PCR.

Results: Anaplasma spp. DNA was detected in 33 (43.4 %) cervids (31 red deer and two fallow deer) and in two (3.1 %) wild boars while Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 %) wild boar blood samples. Sequence analysis of msp4 sequences identified A. marginale, A. ovis, while the analysis of rDNA sequence data disclosed the presence of A. platys and A. phagocytophilum and T. capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3. Anaplasma spp./Theileria spp. mixed infections were found in 17 cervids (22.4 %) and in two wild boars (3.1 %). All samples were negative for Babesia sp., B. burgdorferi (s.l.), Ehrlichia sp. or Rickettsia sp.

Conclusions: This is the first detection of Anaplasma marginale, A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, A. platys, Theileria capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3 in cervids and wild boars from Portugal. Further studies concerning the potential pathogenicity of the different species of  Anaplasma and Theileria infecting wild ungulates, the identification of their vector range, and their putative infectivity to domestic livestock and humans should be undertaken.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus