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Biomarkers of systemic inflammation in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders; a plasma proteomic study.

Ghafouri B, Carlsson A, Holmberg S, Thelin A, Tagesson C - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2016)

Bottom Line: The levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen, one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin, and two isoforms of hemopexin were higher in farmers with MSD than in referents.On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D- binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen, and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin were lower in farmers than in referents.Farmers with MSD had altered plasma levels of protein biomarkers compared to the referents, indicating that farmers with MSD may be subject to a more systemic inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University and Pain and Rehabilitation Center, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Region Östergötland, Linköping, SE-581 85, Sweden. bijar.ghafouri@liu.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Farmers have an increased risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) such as osteoarthritis of the hip, low back pain, and neck and upper limb complaints. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Work-related exposures and inflammatory responses might be involved. Our objective was to identify plasma proteins that differentiated farmers with MSD from rural referents.

Methods: Plasma samples from 13 farmers with MSD and rural referents were included in the investigation. Gel based proteomics was used for protein analysis and proteins that differed significantly between the groups were identified by mass spectrometry.

Results: In total, 15 proteins differed significantly between the groups. The levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen, one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin, and two isoforms of hemopexin were higher in farmers with MSD than in referents. On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D- binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen, and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin were lower in farmers than in referents. Many of the identified proteins are known to be involved in inflammation.

Conclusions: Farmers with MSD had altered plasma levels of protein biomarkers compared to the referents, indicating that farmers with MSD may be subject to a more systemic inflammation. It is possible that the identified differences of proteins may give clues to the biochemical changes occurring during the development and progression of MSD in farmers, and that one or several of these protein biomarkers might eventually be used to identify and prevent work-related MSD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Significantly changed proteins in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders compared to rural referents
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Fig3: Significantly changed proteins in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders compared to rural referents

Mentions: More than 200 protein spots were detected in all samples. To investigate possible differences in the plasma proteomes of farmers with MSD and rural referents, protein spots present in at least 50 % of the gels in either group were matched, quantified for intensity, and compared between the groups. Proteins whose concentrations were statistically different in the two groups were then identified using mass spectrometry. As shown in Table 3, the levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen (spot1507), one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin (spot 2404), and two isoforms of hemopexin (spots 6603 and 7602) were higher in farmers with MSD than in rural referents. On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D- binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen (spot 2607), and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin (spot 3802) were lower (Table 2). Figure 3 pinpoints the statistically differing proteins on a 2DE gel, while Fig. 4 illustrates how the different isoforms of kininogen, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and hemopexin were quantitatively expressed in farmers with MSD and referents, respectively.Table 3


Biomarkers of systemic inflammation in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders; a plasma proteomic study.

Ghafouri B, Carlsson A, Holmberg S, Thelin A, Tagesson C - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2016)

Significantly changed proteins in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders compared to rural referents
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862124&req=5

Fig3: Significantly changed proteins in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders compared to rural referents
Mentions: More than 200 protein spots were detected in all samples. To investigate possible differences in the plasma proteomes of farmers with MSD and rural referents, protein spots present in at least 50 % of the gels in either group were matched, quantified for intensity, and compared between the groups. Proteins whose concentrations were statistically different in the two groups were then identified using mass spectrometry. As shown in Table 3, the levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen (spot1507), one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin (spot 2404), and two isoforms of hemopexin (spots 6603 and 7602) were higher in farmers with MSD than in rural referents. On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D- binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen (spot 2607), and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin (spot 3802) were lower (Table 2). Figure 3 pinpoints the statistically differing proteins on a 2DE gel, while Fig. 4 illustrates how the different isoforms of kininogen, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and hemopexin were quantitatively expressed in farmers with MSD and referents, respectively.Table 3

Bottom Line: The levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen, one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin, and two isoforms of hemopexin were higher in farmers with MSD than in referents.On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D- binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen, and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin were lower in farmers than in referents.Farmers with MSD had altered plasma levels of protein biomarkers compared to the referents, indicating that farmers with MSD may be subject to a more systemic inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University and Pain and Rehabilitation Center, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Region Östergötland, Linköping, SE-581 85, Sweden. bijar.ghafouri@liu.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Farmers have an increased risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) such as osteoarthritis of the hip, low back pain, and neck and upper limb complaints. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Work-related exposures and inflammatory responses might be involved. Our objective was to identify plasma proteins that differentiated farmers with MSD from rural referents.

Methods: Plasma samples from 13 farmers with MSD and rural referents were included in the investigation. Gel based proteomics was used for protein analysis and proteins that differed significantly between the groups were identified by mass spectrometry.

Results: In total, 15 proteins differed significantly between the groups. The levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen, one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin, and two isoforms of hemopexin were higher in farmers with MSD than in referents. On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D- binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen, and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin were lower in farmers than in referents. Many of the identified proteins are known to be involved in inflammation.

Conclusions: Farmers with MSD had altered plasma levels of protein biomarkers compared to the referents, indicating that farmers with MSD may be subject to a more systemic inflammation. It is possible that the identified differences of proteins may give clues to the biochemical changes occurring during the development and progression of MSD in farmers, and that one or several of these protein biomarkers might eventually be used to identify and prevent work-related MSD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus