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Maternal high fat intake affects the development and transcriptional profile of fetal intestine in late gestation using pig model.

Che L, Liu P, Yang Z, Che L, Hu L, Qin L, Wang R, Fang Z, Lin Y, Xu S, Feng B, Li J, Wu D - Lipids Health Dis (2016)

Bottom Line: At d 90 of gestation, two fetuses each gilt were removed by cesarean section.The results showed that feeding HF diet markedly increased the fetal weight and lactase activity, also tended to increase intestinal morphology.Collectively, it could be concluded that maternal high fat intake was able to increase fetal weight and lactase activity, however, it altered the intestinal immune response, signal transduction and metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No.46, Xinkang Road, Ya'an, Sichuan, 625014, People's Republic of China. clianqiang@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal high fat intake on intestinal development and transcriptional profile.

Methods: Eight gilts with similar age and body weight were randomly allocated into 2 groups receiving the control and high fat diets (HF diet) from d 30 to 90 of gestation, with 4 gilts each group and one gilt each pen. At d 90 of gestation, two fetuses each gilt were removed by cesarean section. Intestinal samples were collected for analysis of morphology, enzyme activities and transcriptional profile.

Results: The results showed that feeding HF diet markedly increased the fetal weight and lactase activity, also tended to increase intestinal morphology. Porcine Oligo Microarray analysis indicated that feeding HF diet inhibited 64% of genes (39 genes down-regulated while 22 genes up-regulated),which were related to immune response, cancer and metabolism, also markedly modified 33 signal pathways such as antigen processing and presentation, intestinal immune network for IgA production, Jak-STAT and TGF-ß signaling transductions, pathways in colorectal cancer and glycerolipid metabolism.

Conclusion: Collectively, it could be concluded that maternal high fat intake was able to increase fetal weight and lactase activity, however, it altered the intestinal immune response, signal transduction and metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of maternal high fat intake on the intestinal morphology of fetus (n = 4)
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Fig1: Effect of maternal high fat intake on the intestinal morphology of fetus (n = 4)

Mentions: Feeding HF diet tended to increase intestinal villous height (P = 0.055), but decrease crypt depth (P = 0.098) of fetus (Fig. 1). Meanwhile, the lactase activity was markedly increased (+55 %, P < 0.05) by feeding HF diet relative to CON diet, whereas the maltase activity did not markedly differ between groups (Fig. 2), and sucrase activity could not be detected in fetal intestine. Gene expression of digestive enzymes were not markedly differ between two groups (Additional file 1).Fig. 1


Maternal high fat intake affects the development and transcriptional profile of fetal intestine in late gestation using pig model.

Che L, Liu P, Yang Z, Che L, Hu L, Qin L, Wang R, Fang Z, Lin Y, Xu S, Feng B, Li J, Wu D - Lipids Health Dis (2016)

Effect of maternal high fat intake on the intestinal morphology of fetus (n = 4)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862081&req=5

Fig1: Effect of maternal high fat intake on the intestinal morphology of fetus (n = 4)
Mentions: Feeding HF diet tended to increase intestinal villous height (P = 0.055), but decrease crypt depth (P = 0.098) of fetus (Fig. 1). Meanwhile, the lactase activity was markedly increased (+55 %, P < 0.05) by feeding HF diet relative to CON diet, whereas the maltase activity did not markedly differ between groups (Fig. 2), and sucrase activity could not be detected in fetal intestine. Gene expression of digestive enzymes were not markedly differ between two groups (Additional file 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: At d 90 of gestation, two fetuses each gilt were removed by cesarean section.The results showed that feeding HF diet markedly increased the fetal weight and lactase activity, also tended to increase intestinal morphology.Collectively, it could be concluded that maternal high fat intake was able to increase fetal weight and lactase activity, however, it altered the intestinal immune response, signal transduction and metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No.46, Xinkang Road, Ya'an, Sichuan, 625014, People's Republic of China. clianqiang@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal high fat intake on intestinal development and transcriptional profile.

Methods: Eight gilts with similar age and body weight were randomly allocated into 2 groups receiving the control and high fat diets (HF diet) from d 30 to 90 of gestation, with 4 gilts each group and one gilt each pen. At d 90 of gestation, two fetuses each gilt were removed by cesarean section. Intestinal samples were collected for analysis of morphology, enzyme activities and transcriptional profile.

Results: The results showed that feeding HF diet markedly increased the fetal weight and lactase activity, also tended to increase intestinal morphology. Porcine Oligo Microarray analysis indicated that feeding HF diet inhibited 64% of genes (39 genes down-regulated while 22 genes up-regulated),which were related to immune response, cancer and metabolism, also markedly modified 33 signal pathways such as antigen processing and presentation, intestinal immune network for IgA production, Jak-STAT and TGF-ß signaling transductions, pathways in colorectal cancer and glycerolipid metabolism.

Conclusion: Collectively, it could be concluded that maternal high fat intake was able to increase fetal weight and lactase activity, however, it altered the intestinal immune response, signal transduction and metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus