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Child maltreatment and quality of life: a study of adolescents in residential care.

Greger HK, Myhre AK, Lydersen S, Jozefiak T - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2016)

Bottom Line: Linear regression was used to study the effect of number of types of adversities.Compared with nonexposed peers in RYC, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences on the KINDL-R subdomains (0-100 scale) were 1.9-11.4 (Physical Well-being), 2.2-11.1 (Emotional Well-being), -0.7-10.0 (Self-esteem), and 1.8-10.9 (Friends).Number of types of adversities was associated with a poorer QoL score on all subdomains (Physical- and Emotional Well-being, Self-esteem, Friends, and School).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, St. Olavs Hospital, Pb 6810 Elgeseter, 7433, Trondheim, Norway. hanne.k.greger@ntnu.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Childhood maltreatment is an important risk factor for mental and physical health problems. Adolescents living in residential youth care (RYC) have experienced a high rate of childhood maltreatment and are a high-risk group for psychiatric disorders. Quality of life (QoL) is a subjective, multidimensional concept that goes beyond medical diagnoses. There is a lack of research regarding the associations between childhood maltreatment and QoL. In the present study, we compare self-reported QoL between adolescents in RYC in Norway with and without maltreatment histories, and adolescents from the general population. We also study the impact of number of types of adversities on QoL.

Methods: Adolescents aged 12-23 years living in RYC in Norway were invited to participate in the study; 400 participated, yielding a response rate of 67 %. Maltreatment histories were assessed through interviews with trained research assistants, and completed by 335 adolescents. Previous exposure to maltreatment was reported by 237 adolescents. The Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents (KINDL-R) was used. Nonexposed peers in RYC (n = 98) and a sample of adolescents from the general population (n = 1017) were used for comparison. General linear model analyses (ANCOVA) were conducted with five KINDL-R life domains as dependent variables. Linear regression was used to study the effect of number of types of adversities.

Results: Exposed adolescents in RYC reported poorer QoL than peers in control groups. Compared with nonexposed peers in RYC, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences on the KINDL-R subdomains (0-100 scale) were 1.9-11.4 (Physical Well-being), 2.2-11.1 (Emotional Well-being), -0.7-10.0 (Self-esteem), and 1.8-10.9 (Friends). Compared with the general population sample, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences were 9.7-17.6 (Physical Well-being), 7.9-15.3 (Emotional Well-being), 3.6-12.5 (Self-esteem), and 5.3-12.8 (Friends). Number of types of adversities was associated with a poorer QoL score on all subdomains (Physical- and Emotional Well-being, Self-esteem, Friends, and School).

Conclusions: Childhood maltreatment was associated with a poorer QoL score. We suggest the use of QoL and maltreatment measures for all children and adolescents in RYC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proxy-reported quality of life. Estimated mean scores on KINDL-R subdomains (0–100) compared between adolescents in RYC with childhood maltreatment histories, nonmaltreated adolescents in RYC, and adolescents from the general population. The reports were completed by adolescents’ primary contacts at the institution (for adolescents in RYC) or parents (for the general population). Error bars illustrate the 95 % confidence intervals of the mean scores. The subscale scores were compared by using ANCOVA, adjusted for age and sex. Pairwise comparisons were carried out by combining the global F-test with the local least significance difference test to preserve the familywise error rate (FWER). Mean scores, confidence intervals and p-values are presented in table 4 (Appendix 1)
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Fig4: Proxy-reported quality of life. Estimated mean scores on KINDL-R subdomains (0–100) compared between adolescents in RYC with childhood maltreatment histories, nonmaltreated adolescents in RYC, and adolescents from the general population. The reports were completed by adolescents’ primary contacts at the institution (for adolescents in RYC) or parents (for the general population). Error bars illustrate the 95 % confidence intervals of the mean scores. The subscale scores were compared by using ANCOVA, adjusted for age and sex. Pairwise comparisons were carried out by combining the global F-test with the local least significance difference test to preserve the familywise error rate (FWER). Mean scores, confidence intervals and p-values are presented in table 4 (Appendix 1)

Mentions: The proxy reports were scored by the adolescent’s primary contact at the institution, who was the adult with the closest daily-life relationship to the individual youth. Figure 4 shows a significantly lower score for adolescents in both the maltreated and the nonmaltreated group compared with the general population. There were no significant differences between the two groups of adolescents in RYC, in contrast to the results of the self-reports. The differences between the QoL assessments by the adolescents themselves and by their primary contacts in RYC are even more profound regarding number of types of adversities, as illustrated in Fig. 5. We found no significant differences in the QoL score according to the number of types of childhood adversities on the proxy reports.Fig. 4


Child maltreatment and quality of life: a study of adolescents in residential care.

Greger HK, Myhre AK, Lydersen S, Jozefiak T - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2016)

Proxy-reported quality of life. Estimated mean scores on KINDL-R subdomains (0–100) compared between adolescents in RYC with childhood maltreatment histories, nonmaltreated adolescents in RYC, and adolescents from the general population. The reports were completed by adolescents’ primary contacts at the institution (for adolescents in RYC) or parents (for the general population). Error bars illustrate the 95 % confidence intervals of the mean scores. The subscale scores were compared by using ANCOVA, adjusted for age and sex. Pairwise comparisons were carried out by combining the global F-test with the local least significance difference test to preserve the familywise error rate (FWER). Mean scores, confidence intervals and p-values are presented in table 4 (Appendix 1)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4862063&req=5

Fig4: Proxy-reported quality of life. Estimated mean scores on KINDL-R subdomains (0–100) compared between adolescents in RYC with childhood maltreatment histories, nonmaltreated adolescents in RYC, and adolescents from the general population. The reports were completed by adolescents’ primary contacts at the institution (for adolescents in RYC) or parents (for the general population). Error bars illustrate the 95 % confidence intervals of the mean scores. The subscale scores were compared by using ANCOVA, adjusted for age and sex. Pairwise comparisons were carried out by combining the global F-test with the local least significance difference test to preserve the familywise error rate (FWER). Mean scores, confidence intervals and p-values are presented in table 4 (Appendix 1)
Mentions: The proxy reports were scored by the adolescent’s primary contact at the institution, who was the adult with the closest daily-life relationship to the individual youth. Figure 4 shows a significantly lower score for adolescents in both the maltreated and the nonmaltreated group compared with the general population. There were no significant differences between the two groups of adolescents in RYC, in contrast to the results of the self-reports. The differences between the QoL assessments by the adolescents themselves and by their primary contacts in RYC are even more profound regarding number of types of adversities, as illustrated in Fig. 5. We found no significant differences in the QoL score according to the number of types of childhood adversities on the proxy reports.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Linear regression was used to study the effect of number of types of adversities.Compared with nonexposed peers in RYC, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences on the KINDL-R subdomains (0-100 scale) were 1.9-11.4 (Physical Well-being), 2.2-11.1 (Emotional Well-being), -0.7-10.0 (Self-esteem), and 1.8-10.9 (Friends).Number of types of adversities was associated with a poorer QoL score on all subdomains (Physical- and Emotional Well-being, Self-esteem, Friends, and School).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, St. Olavs Hospital, Pb 6810 Elgeseter, 7433, Trondheim, Norway. hanne.k.greger@ntnu.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Childhood maltreatment is an important risk factor for mental and physical health problems. Adolescents living in residential youth care (RYC) have experienced a high rate of childhood maltreatment and are a high-risk group for psychiatric disorders. Quality of life (QoL) is a subjective, multidimensional concept that goes beyond medical diagnoses. There is a lack of research regarding the associations between childhood maltreatment and QoL. In the present study, we compare self-reported QoL between adolescents in RYC in Norway with and without maltreatment histories, and adolescents from the general population. We also study the impact of number of types of adversities on QoL.

Methods: Adolescents aged 12-23 years living in RYC in Norway were invited to participate in the study; 400 participated, yielding a response rate of 67 %. Maltreatment histories were assessed through interviews with trained research assistants, and completed by 335 adolescents. Previous exposure to maltreatment was reported by 237 adolescents. The Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents (KINDL-R) was used. Nonexposed peers in RYC (n = 98) and a sample of adolescents from the general population (n = 1017) were used for comparison. General linear model analyses (ANCOVA) were conducted with five KINDL-R life domains as dependent variables. Linear regression was used to study the effect of number of types of adversities.

Results: Exposed adolescents in RYC reported poorer QoL than peers in control groups. Compared with nonexposed peers in RYC, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences on the KINDL-R subdomains (0-100 scale) were 1.9-11.4 (Physical Well-being), 2.2-11.1 (Emotional Well-being), -0.7-10.0 (Self-esteem), and 1.8-10.9 (Friends). Compared with the general population sample, the 95 % confidence intervals for mean score differences were 9.7-17.6 (Physical Well-being), 7.9-15.3 (Emotional Well-being), 3.6-12.5 (Self-esteem), and 5.3-12.8 (Friends). Number of types of adversities was associated with a poorer QoL score on all subdomains (Physical- and Emotional Well-being, Self-esteem, Friends, and School).

Conclusions: Childhood maltreatment was associated with a poorer QoL score. We suggest the use of QoL and maltreatment measures for all children and adolescents in RYC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus