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Arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

Zhao G, Liu Y, Yuan B, Shen X, Qu F, Wang J, Qi W, Zhu J, Liu Y - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average.This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV.For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people, often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life. The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA).

Methods: A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males, 94 females; ages 45-81 years, mean 66 years) treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study. Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs, squatting down, or standing up. PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation. The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores. The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect.

Results: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average. The incisions healed well, and no complications occurred. After surgery, the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93, and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48. This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV.

Conclusions: For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Circumpatellar nerve distribution schematic diagram.
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Figure 4: Circumpatellar nerve distribution schematic diagram.

Mentions: Circumpatellar nerves include the cutaneous nerves, the superior branch of the saphenous nerve, and the joint branch of the knee extensor muscle [Figure 4].[1819] The superior branch of the saphenous nerve (also called the patellar branch) passes through the internal superior border of the patella into the subcutaneous prepatellar area and is located in the prepatellar skin. The joint branch of the knee extensor muscle includes the interior, medial and lateral femoral muscular branches; the knee joint muscular branch; and the anterior branch of the obturator nerve. The interior femoral muscular branch originates from the obturator nerve or saphenous nerve and is divided into two branches after entering the joint capsule. The lower branch supports the synovial structures in the interior patella and patellofemoral joint.[20]


Arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

Zhao G, Liu Y, Yuan B, Shen X, Qu F, Wang J, Qi W, Zhu J, Liu Y - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

Circumpatellar nerve distribution schematic diagram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837825&req=5

Figure 4: Circumpatellar nerve distribution schematic diagram.
Mentions: Circumpatellar nerves include the cutaneous nerves, the superior branch of the saphenous nerve, and the joint branch of the knee extensor muscle [Figure 4].[1819] The superior branch of the saphenous nerve (also called the patellar branch) passes through the internal superior border of the patella into the subcutaneous prepatellar area and is located in the prepatellar skin. The joint branch of the knee extensor muscle includes the interior, medial and lateral femoral muscular branches; the knee joint muscular branch; and the anterior branch of the obturator nerve. The interior femoral muscular branch originates from the obturator nerve or saphenous nerve and is divided into two branches after entering the joint capsule. The lower branch supports the synovial structures in the interior patella and patellofemoral joint.[20]

Bottom Line: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average.This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV.For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people, often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life. The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA).

Methods: A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males, 94 females; ages 45-81 years, mean 66 years) treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study. Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs, squatting down, or standing up. PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation. The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores. The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect.

Results: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average. The incisions healed well, and no complications occurred. After surgery, the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93, and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48. This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV.

Conclusions: For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus