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Perceptions of pathology informatics by non-informaticist pathologists and trainees.

Walker A, Garcia C, Baron JM, Gudewicz TM, Gilbertson JR, Henricks WH, Lee RE - J Pathol Inform (2016)

Bottom Line: Differences in departmental informatics culture can be attributed to the varying perceptions of PI by different individuals.Incorrect perceptions exist, such as conflating PI with IT and help desk services, even among those who claim to understand PI.Further efforts by the PI community could address such misperceptions, which could help enable a better understanding of what PI is and is not, and potentially lead to increased acceptance by non-informaticist pathologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cleveland Clinic, Robert J. Tomisch Institute of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44120, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although pathology informatics (PI) is essential to modern pathology practice, the field is often poorly understood. Pathologists who have received little to no exposure to informatics, either in training or in practice, may not recognize the roles that informatics serves in pathology. The purpose of this study was to characterize perceptions of PI by noninformatics-oriented pathologists and to do so at two large centers with differing informatics environments.

Methods: Pathology trainees and staff at Cleveland Clinic (CC) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) were surveyed. At MGH, pathology department leadership has promoted a pervasive informatics presence through practice, training, and research. At CC, PI efforts focus on production systems that serve a multi-site integrated health system and a reference laboratory, and on the development of applications oriented to department operations. The survey assessed perceived definition of PI, interest in PI, and perceived utility of PI.

Results: The survey was completed by 107 noninformatics-oriented pathologists and trainees. A majority viewed informatics positively. Except among MGH trainees, confusion of PI with information technology (IT) and help desk services was prominent, even in those who indicated they understood informatics. Attendings and trainees indicated desire to learn more about PI. While most acknowledged that having some level of PI knowledge would be professionally useful and advantageous, only a minority plan to utilize it.

Conclusions: Informatics is viewed positively by the majority of noninformatics pathologists at two large centers with differing informatics orientations. Differences in departmental informatics culture can be attributed to the varying perceptions of PI by different individuals. Incorrect perceptions exist, such as conflating PI with IT and help desk services, even among those who claim to understand PI. Further efforts by the PI community could address such misperceptions, which could help enable a better understanding of what PI is and is not, and potentially lead to increased acceptance by non-informaticist pathologists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nearly 80% of all respondents believe that pathology informatics knowledge and skills would be professionally useful and advantageous; however, fewer respondents actually plan to use pathology informatics
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Figure 4: Nearly 80% of all respondents believe that pathology informatics knowledge and skills would be professionally useful and advantageous; however, fewer respondents actually plan to use pathology informatics

Mentions: In this section, a relatively nuanced series of questions was developed to assess whether respondents found PI to be useful for both pathologists in general and on a personal level. Responses to three of the most representative questions within this area of focus are represented in Figure 4. Eighty percent of all respondents agreed that pathologists need to be familiar with and knowledgeable in informatics; only 4% disagreed. When asked to consider their personal careers, 76% of all respondents agreed that having informatics knowledge and skills would be an asset, and 56% felt that a lack of these skills would be detrimental. While 73% of respondents expressed an interest in including PI within their practice, with 72% acknowledging the importance of informatics to their careers as pathologists, only 65% actually planned to use PI. However, among those who found informatics exciting, 83% planned to incorporate PI into their careers.


Perceptions of pathology informatics by non-informaticist pathologists and trainees.

Walker A, Garcia C, Baron JM, Gudewicz TM, Gilbertson JR, Henricks WH, Lee RE - J Pathol Inform (2016)

Nearly 80% of all respondents believe that pathology informatics knowledge and skills would be professionally useful and advantageous; however, fewer respondents actually plan to use pathology informatics
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837799&req=5

Figure 4: Nearly 80% of all respondents believe that pathology informatics knowledge and skills would be professionally useful and advantageous; however, fewer respondents actually plan to use pathology informatics
Mentions: In this section, a relatively nuanced series of questions was developed to assess whether respondents found PI to be useful for both pathologists in general and on a personal level. Responses to three of the most representative questions within this area of focus are represented in Figure 4. Eighty percent of all respondents agreed that pathologists need to be familiar with and knowledgeable in informatics; only 4% disagreed. When asked to consider their personal careers, 76% of all respondents agreed that having informatics knowledge and skills would be an asset, and 56% felt that a lack of these skills would be detrimental. While 73% of respondents expressed an interest in including PI within their practice, with 72% acknowledging the importance of informatics to their careers as pathologists, only 65% actually planned to use PI. However, among those who found informatics exciting, 83% planned to incorporate PI into their careers.

Bottom Line: Differences in departmental informatics culture can be attributed to the varying perceptions of PI by different individuals.Incorrect perceptions exist, such as conflating PI with IT and help desk services, even among those who claim to understand PI.Further efforts by the PI community could address such misperceptions, which could help enable a better understanding of what PI is and is not, and potentially lead to increased acceptance by non-informaticist pathologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cleveland Clinic, Robert J. Tomisch Institute of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44120, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although pathology informatics (PI) is essential to modern pathology practice, the field is often poorly understood. Pathologists who have received little to no exposure to informatics, either in training or in practice, may not recognize the roles that informatics serves in pathology. The purpose of this study was to characterize perceptions of PI by noninformatics-oriented pathologists and to do so at two large centers with differing informatics environments.

Methods: Pathology trainees and staff at Cleveland Clinic (CC) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) were surveyed. At MGH, pathology department leadership has promoted a pervasive informatics presence through practice, training, and research. At CC, PI efforts focus on production systems that serve a multi-site integrated health system and a reference laboratory, and on the development of applications oriented to department operations. The survey assessed perceived definition of PI, interest in PI, and perceived utility of PI.

Results: The survey was completed by 107 noninformatics-oriented pathologists and trainees. A majority viewed informatics positively. Except among MGH trainees, confusion of PI with information technology (IT) and help desk services was prominent, even in those who indicated they understood informatics. Attendings and trainees indicated desire to learn more about PI. While most acknowledged that having some level of PI knowledge would be professionally useful and advantageous, only a minority plan to utilize it.

Conclusions: Informatics is viewed positively by the majority of noninformatics pathologists at two large centers with differing informatics orientations. Differences in departmental informatics culture can be attributed to the varying perceptions of PI by different individuals. Incorrect perceptions exist, such as conflating PI with IT and help desk services, even among those who claim to understand PI. Further efforts by the PI community could address such misperceptions, which could help enable a better understanding of what PI is and is not, and potentially lead to increased acceptance by non-informaticist pathologists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus