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Trends in Scientific Literature on Addiction to the Internet, Video Games, and Cell Phones from 2006 to 2010.

Carbonell X, Guardiola E, Fuster H, Gil F, Panova T - Int J Prev Med (2016)

Bottom Line: Search results were reviewed to eliminate articles that were not relevant or were duplicates.Results were compared with those of 1996-2005.The scientific contributions of China, Taiwan, and Korea are overrepresented compared to other scientific fields such as drug addiction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, FPCEE Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: The goals of the present work were to retrieve the scientific articles published on addiction to the Internet, video games, and cell phones and to analyze the pattern of publications in this area (who is doing the research, when and where it is taking place, and in which journals it is being published), to determine the research being conducted as well as to document geographical trends in publication over time in three types of technological addictions: Internet, cell phones, and video games.

Methods: Articles indexed in PubMed and PsycINFO between 2006 and 2010 related to the pathological use of Internet, cell phones, and video games were retrieved. Search results were reviewed to eliminate articles that were not relevant or were duplicates.

Results: Three hundred and thirty valid articles were retrieved from PubMed and PsycINFO from 2006 to 2010. Results were compared with those of 1996-2005. The year with the highest number of articles published was 2008 (n = 96). The most productive countries, in terms of number of articles published, were China (n = 67), the United States (n = 56), the United Kingdom (n = 47), and Taiwan (n = 33). The most commonly used language was English (70.3%), followed by Chinese (15.4%). Articles were published in 153 different journals. The journal that published the most articles was Cyberpsychology and Behavior (n = 73), followed by Chinese Journal of Clinical Psychology (n = 27) and International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction (n = 16). Internet was the area most frequently studied, with an increasing interest in other areas such as online video games and cell phones.

Conclusions: The number of publications on technological addictions reached a peak in 2008. The scientific contributions of China, Taiwan, and Korea are overrepresented compared to other scientific fields such as drug addiction. The inclusion of Internet Gaming Disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5(th) Edition could change the publication trends in the technological addiction area and underline the relevance of this upcoming disorder in dissatisfaction with life in general.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of articles published on addiction to the Internet, video games, and cell phones in the periods 1996–2005 and 2006–2010 by geographical areas
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Figure 2: Percentage of articles published on addiction to the Internet, video games, and cell phones in the periods 1996–2005 and 2006–2010 by geographical areas

Mentions: As Figure 2 shows, the combined production of China, Taiwan, and Korea between 2006 and 2010 is higher than the European Union and almost twice that of the United States and Canada together. Moreover, one must also understand that as technological addictions are a new field of scientific knowledge, authors from emerging countries may find it a promising area in which to publish. Interestingly, Internet addiction prevalence was higher for countries with dissatisfaction with life in general. The authors found that the prevalence of Internet addiction was inversely associated with the quality of life. These data were aligned with both types of indicators: Subjective (i.e., life satisfaction) and objective (i.e., quality of environmental conditions) indicators.[12] Surprisingly, in the regions with the highest Internet accessibility, Internet has a low prevalence. These variations in prevalence rate across world regions pointed out the importance of cultural factors. Most available studies of Internet addiction have been conducted in Asia.[19] Therefore, the cultural influences on perceived control and parental attitudes may be another angle from which to formulate culture-specific health approaches.[20]


Trends in Scientific Literature on Addiction to the Internet, Video Games, and Cell Phones from 2006 to 2010.

Carbonell X, Guardiola E, Fuster H, Gil F, Panova T - Int J Prev Med (2016)

Percentage of articles published on addiction to the Internet, video games, and cell phones in the periods 1996–2005 and 2006–2010 by geographical areas
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837796&req=5

Figure 2: Percentage of articles published on addiction to the Internet, video games, and cell phones in the periods 1996–2005 and 2006–2010 by geographical areas
Mentions: As Figure 2 shows, the combined production of China, Taiwan, and Korea between 2006 and 2010 is higher than the European Union and almost twice that of the United States and Canada together. Moreover, one must also understand that as technological addictions are a new field of scientific knowledge, authors from emerging countries may find it a promising area in which to publish. Interestingly, Internet addiction prevalence was higher for countries with dissatisfaction with life in general. The authors found that the prevalence of Internet addiction was inversely associated with the quality of life. These data were aligned with both types of indicators: Subjective (i.e., life satisfaction) and objective (i.e., quality of environmental conditions) indicators.[12] Surprisingly, in the regions with the highest Internet accessibility, Internet has a low prevalence. These variations in prevalence rate across world regions pointed out the importance of cultural factors. Most available studies of Internet addiction have been conducted in Asia.[19] Therefore, the cultural influences on perceived control and parental attitudes may be another angle from which to formulate culture-specific health approaches.[20]

Bottom Line: Search results were reviewed to eliminate articles that were not relevant or were duplicates.Results were compared with those of 1996-2005.The scientific contributions of China, Taiwan, and Korea are overrepresented compared to other scientific fields such as drug addiction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, FPCEE Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: The goals of the present work were to retrieve the scientific articles published on addiction to the Internet, video games, and cell phones and to analyze the pattern of publications in this area (who is doing the research, when and where it is taking place, and in which journals it is being published), to determine the research being conducted as well as to document geographical trends in publication over time in three types of technological addictions: Internet, cell phones, and video games.

Methods: Articles indexed in PubMed and PsycINFO between 2006 and 2010 related to the pathological use of Internet, cell phones, and video games were retrieved. Search results were reviewed to eliminate articles that were not relevant or were duplicates.

Results: Three hundred and thirty valid articles were retrieved from PubMed and PsycINFO from 2006 to 2010. Results were compared with those of 1996-2005. The year with the highest number of articles published was 2008 (n = 96). The most productive countries, in terms of number of articles published, were China (n = 67), the United States (n = 56), the United Kingdom (n = 47), and Taiwan (n = 33). The most commonly used language was English (70.3%), followed by Chinese (15.4%). Articles were published in 153 different journals. The journal that published the most articles was Cyberpsychology and Behavior (n = 73), followed by Chinese Journal of Clinical Psychology (n = 27) and International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction (n = 16). Internet was the area most frequently studied, with an increasing interest in other areas such as online video games and cell phones.

Conclusions: The number of publications on technological addictions reached a peak in 2008. The scientific contributions of China, Taiwan, and Korea are overrepresented compared to other scientific fields such as drug addiction. The inclusion of Internet Gaming Disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5(th) Edition could change the publication trends in the technological addiction area and underline the relevance of this upcoming disorder in dissatisfaction with life in general.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus