Limits...
Current trends to measure implant stability

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Implant stability plays a critical role for successful osseointegration. Successful osseointegration is a prerequisite for functional dental implants. Continuous monitoring in an objective and qualitative manner is important to determine the status of implant stability. Implant stability is measured at two different stages: Primary and secondary. Primary stability comes from mechanical engagement with cortical bone. Secondary stability is developed from regeneration and remodeling of the bone and tissue around the implant after insertion and affected by the primary stability, bone formation and remodelling. The time of functional loading is dependent upon the implant stability. Historically the gold standard method to evaluate stability were microscopic or histologic analysis, radiographs, however due to invasiveness of these methods and related ethical issues various other methods have been proposed like cutting torque resistance, reverse torque analysis, model analysis etc. It is, therefore, of an utmost importance to be able to access implant stability at various time points and to project a long term prognosis for successful therapy. Therefore this review focuses on the currently available methods for evaluation of implant stability.

No MeSH data available.


Picture showing the principle of electronic resonance frequency analyzer cited from Osstell website, www.osstell.com, April, 2011
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837777&req=5

Figure 3: Picture showing the principle of electronic resonance frequency analyzer cited from Osstell website, www.osstell.com, April, 2011

Mentions: It was suggested by Meredith in 1998.[30] It is a noninvasive diagnostic method that measures implant stability and bone density at various time points using vibration and a principle of structural analysis. RFA [Figure 3] utilizes a small L-shaped transducer that is tightened to the implant or abutment by a screw. The transducer comprises of two ceramic elements, one of which is vibrated by a sinusoidal signal (5–15 kHz) while the other serves as a receptor. The transducer is screwed directly to the implant body and shakes the implant at a constant input and amplitude, starting at a low frequency and increasing in pitch until the implant resonates. High frequency resonance indicates stronger bone-implant interface. It also provides baseline reading for future comparison and postsurgical placement of the implant. RFA has been widely used for clinically assessing osseointegration, as well as for prognostic evaluation. However, the latter aspect still has to be questioned.


Current trends to measure implant stability
Picture showing the principle of electronic resonance frequency analyzer cited from Osstell website, www.osstell.com, April, 2011
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837777&req=5

Figure 3: Picture showing the principle of electronic resonance frequency analyzer cited from Osstell website, www.osstell.com, April, 2011
Mentions: It was suggested by Meredith in 1998.[30] It is a noninvasive diagnostic method that measures implant stability and bone density at various time points using vibration and a principle of structural analysis. RFA [Figure 3] utilizes a small L-shaped transducer that is tightened to the implant or abutment by a screw. The transducer comprises of two ceramic elements, one of which is vibrated by a sinusoidal signal (5–15 kHz) while the other serves as a receptor. The transducer is screwed directly to the implant body and shakes the implant at a constant input and amplitude, starting at a low frequency and increasing in pitch until the implant resonates. High frequency resonance indicates stronger bone-implant interface. It also provides baseline reading for future comparison and postsurgical placement of the implant. RFA has been widely used for clinically assessing osseointegration, as well as for prognostic evaluation. However, the latter aspect still has to be questioned.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Implant stability plays a critical role for successful osseointegration. Successful osseointegration is a prerequisite for functional dental implants. Continuous monitoring in an objective and qualitative manner is important to determine the status of implant stability. Implant stability is measured at two different stages: Primary and secondary. Primary stability comes from mechanical engagement with cortical bone. Secondary stability is developed from regeneration and remodeling of the bone and tissue around the implant after insertion and affected by the primary stability, bone formation and remodelling. The time of functional loading is dependent upon the implant stability. Historically the gold standard method to evaluate stability were microscopic or histologic analysis, radiographs, however due to invasiveness of these methods and related ethical issues various other methods have been proposed like cutting torque resistance, reverse torque analysis, model analysis etc. It is, therefore, of an utmost importance to be able to access implant stability at various time points and to project a long term prognosis for successful therapy. Therefore this review focuses on the currently available methods for evaluation of implant stability.

No MeSH data available.