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Some issues related to evidence-based implantology

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ABSTRACT

This article reviews relevant dental literature to answer some frequent questions related to evidence-based implantology. There are hundreds of implant systems on the market, but the majority lack clinical documentation. Recommended number of implants for full-arch fixed prostheses is four or five in the mandible but at least six in the maxilla. Less expensive implant-retained overdentures make implant treatment available to a greater portion of edentulous subjects. Mandibular overdentures on two implants, and even one implant, have shown excellent long-term outcomes. In the maxilla, less than four implants are not recommended for good results. Single implant restorations have good prognosis, but placement of the implant should be postponed until adulthood. Osseointegrated implants have revolutionized clinical dentistry. However, in a global perspective, implants make up only a small part of all prosthodontic treatment. Knowledge and skill in conventional prosthodontics must be maintained as it will remain the most common part of the specialty.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean mandibular peri-implant bone loss with respect to prosthetic status in the maxilla. CD = complete denture during the follow-up period of 15 years (n = 31); ISFP = Implant-supported fixed prosthesis place on average after 4.5 years (n = 13)
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Figure 5: Mean mandibular peri-implant bone loss with respect to prosthetic status in the maxilla. CD = complete denture during the follow-up period of 15 years (n = 31); ISFP = Implant-supported fixed prosthesis place on average after 4.5 years (n = 13)

Mentions: Many factors have an influence on the choice between a fixed and removable implant prosthesis of an edentulous patient, tradition and economy being among the strongest. The great difference between Sweden and the Netherlands may to a great extent be explained by differences in the two countries’ dental insurance systems: In Sweden, both fixed and removable prostheses are reimbursed; in the Netherlands, only the removable are reimbursed. At the beginning of the implant era in Sweden, the resources for implant treatment were limited and most of the edentulous patients demanding implants were treated with a mandibular ISFDP and a maxillary complete denture [Figure 4]. In a series of edentulous patients who asked for implant treatment received at first only a mandibular ISFDP and who were told that they might later on come for a maxillary ISFDP. Only a minority of the group (13 of 47) attended for having implants in both jaws.[36] There was no significant difference in mandibular peri-implant bone loss between those who had a maxillary ISFPD or a complete denture [Figure 5; from Carlsson et al[37].


Some issues related to evidence-based implantology
Mean mandibular peri-implant bone loss with respect to prosthetic status in the maxilla. CD = complete denture during the follow-up period of 15 years (n = 31); ISFP = Implant-supported fixed prosthesis place on average after 4.5 years (n = 13)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837771&req=5

Figure 5: Mean mandibular peri-implant bone loss with respect to prosthetic status in the maxilla. CD = complete denture during the follow-up period of 15 years (n = 31); ISFP = Implant-supported fixed prosthesis place on average after 4.5 years (n = 13)
Mentions: Many factors have an influence on the choice between a fixed and removable implant prosthesis of an edentulous patient, tradition and economy being among the strongest. The great difference between Sweden and the Netherlands may to a great extent be explained by differences in the two countries’ dental insurance systems: In Sweden, both fixed and removable prostheses are reimbursed; in the Netherlands, only the removable are reimbursed. At the beginning of the implant era in Sweden, the resources for implant treatment were limited and most of the edentulous patients demanding implants were treated with a mandibular ISFDP and a maxillary complete denture [Figure 4]. In a series of edentulous patients who asked for implant treatment received at first only a mandibular ISFDP and who were told that they might later on come for a maxillary ISFDP. Only a minority of the group (13 of 47) attended for having implants in both jaws.[36] There was no significant difference in mandibular peri-implant bone loss between those who had a maxillary ISFPD or a complete denture [Figure 5; from Carlsson et al[37].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This article reviews relevant dental literature to answer some frequent questions related to evidence-based implantology. There are hundreds of implant systems on the market, but the majority lack clinical documentation. Recommended number of implants for full-arch fixed prostheses is four or five in the mandible but at least six in the maxilla. Less expensive implant-retained overdentures make implant treatment available to a greater portion of edentulous subjects. Mandibular overdentures on two implants, and even one implant, have shown excellent long-term outcomes. In the maxilla, less than four implants are not recommended for good results. Single implant restorations have good prognosis, but placement of the implant should be postponed until adulthood. Osseointegrated implants have revolutionized clinical dentistry. However, in a global perspective, implants make up only a small part of all prosthodontic treatment. Knowledge and skill in conventional prosthodontics must be maintained as it will remain the most common part of the specialty.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus