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Prosthetic rehabilitation of surgically treated orbital defects - evisceration, enucleation, and exenteration: A case series

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ABSTRACT

The rehabilitation of a patient who has suffered the psychological trauma due to loss of an eye requires a prosthesis that will provide the optimum cosmetic and functional result. The mode of rehabilitation varies based on the type of defect and surgical approach being adopted. A case series of prosthetic rehabilitation of three types of orbital defects - evisceration, enucleation and exenteration have been reported in this article. The clinical relevance of surgical approaches highlights the preservation of remaining anatomic structures creating a negative space or concavity to aid in future prosthetic rehabilitation. A multidisciplinary management and team approach is essential in providing esthetics and to regain the confidence. Follow-up care for the patient is mandatory.

No MeSH data available.


Enucleated defect
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Figure 3: Enucleated defect

Mentions: A 48-year-old male patient who was a victim of road traffic accident where glass piece penetrated into his eye and a secondary infection developed. The surgical resection procedure involved removal of the entire eyeball severing muscles and optic nerve [Figure 3]. Enucleation removes the entire globe (without opening it) by severing all muscles, nerves, and blood vessels attached to it from the orbit. The most common indications for enucleation are treatment of intraocular malignancies, relief of pain in blind eyes; removal of severely traumatized, deformed, or phthisical eyes without visual potential; and prevention of sympathetic ophthalmia.[6]


Prosthetic rehabilitation of surgically treated orbital defects - evisceration, enucleation, and exenteration: A case series
Enucleated defect
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837766&req=5

Figure 3: Enucleated defect
Mentions: A 48-year-old male patient who was a victim of road traffic accident where glass piece penetrated into his eye and a secondary infection developed. The surgical resection procedure involved removal of the entire eyeball severing muscles and optic nerve [Figure 3]. Enucleation removes the entire globe (without opening it) by severing all muscles, nerves, and blood vessels attached to it from the orbit. The most common indications for enucleation are treatment of intraocular malignancies, relief of pain in blind eyes; removal of severely traumatized, deformed, or phthisical eyes without visual potential; and prevention of sympathetic ophthalmia.[6]

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The rehabilitation of a patient who has suffered the psychological trauma due to loss of an eye requires a prosthesis that will provide the optimum cosmetic and functional result. The mode of rehabilitation varies based on the type of defect and surgical approach being adopted. A case series of prosthetic rehabilitation of three types of orbital defects - evisceration, enucleation and exenteration have been reported in this article. The clinical relevance of surgical approaches highlights the preservation of remaining anatomic structures creating a negative space or concavity to aid in future prosthetic rehabilitation. A multidisciplinary management and team approach is essential in providing esthetics and to regain the confidence. Follow-up care for the patient is mandatory.

No MeSH data available.