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Antioxidant and antiplatelet activities of flavonoid-rich fractions of three citrus fruits from Korea

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ABSTRACT

Three different fractional (methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) extracts from yuzu (Citrus junos Sieb ex Tanaka), hallabong [(C. unshiu Marcov × C. sinensis Osbeck) × C. reticulata Blanco] and orange (C. sinensis) were evaluated for their antioxidant activity and antiplatelet effects. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods were used for the antioxidant activity tests. Total flavonoids and total phenolics were also evaluated spectrophotometrically. The ethyl acetate fraction contained the highest total flavonoid and total phenolic content and exhibited the highest antioxidant activities (185.2 ± 14.5 and 208.7 ± 17.5 mg/g dry extract for FRAP and CUPRAC values, respectively). The total phenolic and total flavonoid content ranged from 58.2 ± 1.4 to 102.4 ± 8.6 and 19.6 ± 0.5 to 64.3 ± 0.8 mg/g dry extract, respectively. The results of DPPH assay showed that ethyl acetate fractions had the least IC50 values (0.12 ± 0.002, 0.04 ± 0.0006, in mg/mL for orange and hallabong samples, respectively) followed by the hexane fraction (0.19 ± 0.007 mg/mL) of the orange sample. For all fractions, the antioxidant activity and contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids correlated well with each other. In vitro investigation of the antiplatelet effect showed that ethyl acetate fraction has the highest inhibition (84.3 ± 5.8 to 96.1 ± 1.8 %). Hexane and MeOH fractions of hallabong and orange samples inhibited platelet aggregations by less than or equal to 41 %.

No MeSH data available.


Dose-dependent in vitro inhibitory effect of different fractions of yuzu fruit on platelet aggregation induced by collagen (2 μg/mL) (n ≥ 3 mean ± SD *p < 0.05 vs vehicle)
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Fig2: Dose-dependent in vitro inhibitory effect of different fractions of yuzu fruit on platelet aggregation induced by collagen (2 μg/mL) (n ≥ 3 mean ± SD *p < 0.05 vs vehicle)

Mentions: In vitro platelet aggregation and inhibition study induced by the agonist collagen, with added fractional extracts of citrus fruits was conducted and the results are presented in Fig. 1. All the fractions inhibited platelet aggregation to a different extent. The inhibition of platelet aggregation was observed in the following order: ethyl acetate > methanol > hexane. The trend is in a similar fashion for all the three citrus species tested. Dose response experiments for fractions of yuzu extract were found to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregations in a dose-dependent manner (Fig. 2). Yuzu fractions at 1 mg/mL blocked platelet aggregations by 96.1 ± 1.8, 79.9 ± 2.1 and 77 ± 6.7 % for the EA, MeOH and hexane fractions, respectively. The EA fractions of all the fruit samples were found to inhibit platelet aggregation by more than 80 %. However, the hexane and MeOH fractions of hallabong and orange samples inhibited platelet aggregations by less than or equal to 41 %. Inter-species comparison showed that 1 mg/mL of each fraction inhibited the aggregation of platelets in the order yuzu > hallabong > orange for the EA and hexane fractions. However, the order of inhibition for the methanol fraction is yuzu > orange > hallabong. Overall, it was observed that the yuzu extract was relatively more potent in inhibiting platelet aggregation than either hallabong or orange. Aspirin was tested for comparison. 0.3 mg/mL aspirin blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation by 95.7 %, which is almost equal to 1 mg/mL of ethyl acetate fraction of yuzu.Fig. 1


Antioxidant and antiplatelet activities of flavonoid-rich fractions of three citrus fruits from Korea
Dose-dependent in vitro inhibitory effect of different fractions of yuzu fruit on platelet aggregation induced by collagen (2 μg/mL) (n ≥ 3 mean ± SD *p < 0.05 vs vehicle)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837764&req=5

Fig2: Dose-dependent in vitro inhibitory effect of different fractions of yuzu fruit on platelet aggregation induced by collagen (2 μg/mL) (n ≥ 3 mean ± SD *p < 0.05 vs vehicle)
Mentions: In vitro platelet aggregation and inhibition study induced by the agonist collagen, with added fractional extracts of citrus fruits was conducted and the results are presented in Fig. 1. All the fractions inhibited platelet aggregation to a different extent. The inhibition of platelet aggregation was observed in the following order: ethyl acetate > methanol > hexane. The trend is in a similar fashion for all the three citrus species tested. Dose response experiments for fractions of yuzu extract were found to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregations in a dose-dependent manner (Fig. 2). Yuzu fractions at 1 mg/mL blocked platelet aggregations by 96.1 ± 1.8, 79.9 ± 2.1 and 77 ± 6.7 % for the EA, MeOH and hexane fractions, respectively. The EA fractions of all the fruit samples were found to inhibit platelet aggregation by more than 80 %. However, the hexane and MeOH fractions of hallabong and orange samples inhibited platelet aggregations by less than or equal to 41 %. Inter-species comparison showed that 1 mg/mL of each fraction inhibited the aggregation of platelets in the order yuzu > hallabong > orange for the EA and hexane fractions. However, the order of inhibition for the methanol fraction is yuzu > orange > hallabong. Overall, it was observed that the yuzu extract was relatively more potent in inhibiting platelet aggregation than either hallabong or orange. Aspirin was tested for comparison. 0.3 mg/mL aspirin blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation by 95.7 %, which is almost equal to 1 mg/mL of ethyl acetate fraction of yuzu.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Three different fractional (methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) extracts from yuzu (Citrus junos Sieb ex Tanaka), hallabong [(C. unshiu Marcov&nbsp;&times;&nbsp;C. sinensis Osbeck)&nbsp;&times;&nbsp;C. reticulata Blanco] and orange (C. sinensis) were evaluated for their antioxidant activity and antiplatelet effects. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods were used for the antioxidant activity tests. Total flavonoids and total phenolics were also evaluated spectrophotometrically. The ethyl acetate fraction contained the highest total flavonoid and total phenolic content and exhibited the highest antioxidant activities (185.2&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;14.5 and 208.7&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;17.5&nbsp;mg/g dry extract for FRAP and CUPRAC values, respectively). The total phenolic and total flavonoid content ranged from 58.2&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;1.4 to 102.4&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;8.6 and 19.6&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;0.5 to 64.3&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;0.8&nbsp;mg/g dry extract, respectively. The results of DPPH assay showed that ethyl acetate fractions had the least IC50 values (0.12&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;0.002, 0.04&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;0.0006, in mg/mL for orange and hallabong samples, respectively) followed by the hexane fraction (0.19&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;0.007&nbsp;mg/mL) of the orange sample. For all fractions, the antioxidant activity and contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids correlated well with each other. In vitro investigation of the antiplatelet effect showed that ethyl acetate fraction has the highest inhibition (84.3&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;5.8 to 96.1&nbsp;&plusmn;&nbsp;1.8&nbsp;%). Hexane and MeOH fractions of hallabong and orange samples inhibited platelet aggregations by less than or equal to 41&nbsp;%.

No MeSH data available.