Limits...
The Cajal School in the Peripheral Nervous System: The Transcendent Contributions of Fernando de Castro on the Microscopic Structure of Sensory and Autonomic Motor Ganglia.

de Castro F - Front Neuroanat (2016)

Bottom Line: Lawrentjew and the Spanish Fernando de Castro developed new technical approaches with spectacular results.In the mid of the 1920's, both young neuroscientists were worldwide recognized as the top experts in the field.Most of these discoveries remain fully alive today.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Grupo de Neurobiología del Desarrollo-GNDe, Instituto Cajal-CSIC Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The fine structure of the autonomic nervous system was largely unknown at the beginning of the second decade of the 20th century. Although relatively anatomists and histologists had studied the subject, even the assays by the great Russian histologist Alexander Dogiel and the Spanish Nobel Prize laureate, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, were incomplete. In a time which witnessed fundamental discoveries by Langley, Loewi and Dale on the physiology of the autonomic nervous system, both reputed researchers entrusted one of their outstanding disciples to the challenge to further investigate autonomic structures: the Russian B.I. Lawrentjew and the Spanish Fernando de Castro developed new technical approaches with spectacular results. In the mid of the 1920's, both young neuroscientists were worldwide recognized as the top experts in the field. In the present work we describe the main discoveries by Fernando de Castro in those years regarding the structure of sympathetic and sensory ganglia, the organization of the synaptic contacts in these ganglia, and the nature of their innervation, later materialized in their respective chapters, personally invited by the editor, in Wilder Penfield's famous textbook on Neurology and the Nervous System. Most of these discoveries remain fully alive today.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Some proofs of the long-term friendship developed by Fernando de Castro with other disciples and visitors of the laboratory of Santiago Ramón y Cajal. (A) Manuscript letter from Rafael Lorente de Nó to Fernando de Castro describing the excellent formation and situation of de Castro in the neuroscientific panorama of the mid 1920’s. (B) Original charcoal portrait of Fernando de Castro by Ferenc Miskolzy (made in 1926, in Madrid), Hungarian painter and brother of the founder of modern Hungarian Neurology, Deszo Miskolzy, disciple and translator of Cajal’s books and close friend of de Castro for years. The painter came to Spain because he wanted to visit exiled last Austro-Hungarian empress, Zita, exiled in Spain. Following recommendations of his brother Deszo, he visited Fernando de Castro at Madrid, who showed him his scientific drawings and his deep interest and knowledge in Art. The painter gifted this charbon portrait to the Spanish neuroscientist as a proof of the close frienship of both Miskolzy brothers and Fernando de Castro. (C) Madrid (Spain), December 1958, from the left to the right, Florencio Bustinza (1902–1982; born at Liverpool, pharmacologist and profesor of Biology at Madrid), Sir Howard Florey (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1945) and Fernando de Castro. Bustinza was personal friend of Sir Alexander Fleming and Sir Howard Florey since 1948, and Fernando de Castro kept frienship with the latter since his time at Cajal’s laboratory to learn histological technique during the mid 1920s, (A–C) are part of Archive Fernando de Castro.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837679&req=5

Figure 4: Some proofs of the long-term friendship developed by Fernando de Castro with other disciples and visitors of the laboratory of Santiago Ramón y Cajal. (A) Manuscript letter from Rafael Lorente de Nó to Fernando de Castro describing the excellent formation and situation of de Castro in the neuroscientific panorama of the mid 1920’s. (B) Original charcoal portrait of Fernando de Castro by Ferenc Miskolzy (made in 1926, in Madrid), Hungarian painter and brother of the founder of modern Hungarian Neurology, Deszo Miskolzy, disciple and translator of Cajal’s books and close friend of de Castro for years. The painter came to Spain because he wanted to visit exiled last Austro-Hungarian empress, Zita, exiled in Spain. Following recommendations of his brother Deszo, he visited Fernando de Castro at Madrid, who showed him his scientific drawings and his deep interest and knowledge in Art. The painter gifted this charbon portrait to the Spanish neuroscientist as a proof of the close frienship of both Miskolzy brothers and Fernando de Castro. (C) Madrid (Spain), December 1958, from the left to the right, Florencio Bustinza (1902–1982; born at Liverpool, pharmacologist and profesor of Biology at Madrid), Sir Howard Florey (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1945) and Fernando de Castro. Bustinza was personal friend of Sir Alexander Fleming and Sir Howard Florey since 1948, and Fernando de Castro kept frienship with the latter since his time at Cajal’s laboratory to learn histological technique during the mid 1920s, (A–C) are part of Archive Fernando de Castro.

Mentions: Because, indeed, Fernando de Castro was personally entrusted by Ramón y Cajal to direct the technical training and the research of all the fellows and researchers who arrived between 1924 and 1932 from the entire world to learn and work at the Cajal Institute, like, among many others, Deszö Miskolczy (1894–1978; considered as the father of Neuroscience in Hungary), Howard Florey (1898–1968; awarded with the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945), André Dewulf (Belgium), or Clemente Estable (1894–1976; Uruguay). A number of visitors became significant friends of Fernando de Castro (Figures 4B,C). Penfield did not formally work at Cajal’s laboratory, partly due to the so vaunted distancing between the Maestro and his disciple, as Penfield himself writes:


The Cajal School in the Peripheral Nervous System: The Transcendent Contributions of Fernando de Castro on the Microscopic Structure of Sensory and Autonomic Motor Ganglia.

de Castro F - Front Neuroanat (2016)

Some proofs of the long-term friendship developed by Fernando de Castro with other disciples and visitors of the laboratory of Santiago Ramón y Cajal. (A) Manuscript letter from Rafael Lorente de Nó to Fernando de Castro describing the excellent formation and situation of de Castro in the neuroscientific panorama of the mid 1920’s. (B) Original charcoal portrait of Fernando de Castro by Ferenc Miskolzy (made in 1926, in Madrid), Hungarian painter and brother of the founder of modern Hungarian Neurology, Deszo Miskolzy, disciple and translator of Cajal’s books and close friend of de Castro for years. The painter came to Spain because he wanted to visit exiled last Austro-Hungarian empress, Zita, exiled in Spain. Following recommendations of his brother Deszo, he visited Fernando de Castro at Madrid, who showed him his scientific drawings and his deep interest and knowledge in Art. The painter gifted this charbon portrait to the Spanish neuroscientist as a proof of the close frienship of both Miskolzy brothers and Fernando de Castro. (C) Madrid (Spain), December 1958, from the left to the right, Florencio Bustinza (1902–1982; born at Liverpool, pharmacologist and profesor of Biology at Madrid), Sir Howard Florey (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1945) and Fernando de Castro. Bustinza was personal friend of Sir Alexander Fleming and Sir Howard Florey since 1948, and Fernando de Castro kept frienship with the latter since his time at Cajal’s laboratory to learn histological technique during the mid 1920s, (A–C) are part of Archive Fernando de Castro.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837679&req=5

Figure 4: Some proofs of the long-term friendship developed by Fernando de Castro with other disciples and visitors of the laboratory of Santiago Ramón y Cajal. (A) Manuscript letter from Rafael Lorente de Nó to Fernando de Castro describing the excellent formation and situation of de Castro in the neuroscientific panorama of the mid 1920’s. (B) Original charcoal portrait of Fernando de Castro by Ferenc Miskolzy (made in 1926, in Madrid), Hungarian painter and brother of the founder of modern Hungarian Neurology, Deszo Miskolzy, disciple and translator of Cajal’s books and close friend of de Castro for years. The painter came to Spain because he wanted to visit exiled last Austro-Hungarian empress, Zita, exiled in Spain. Following recommendations of his brother Deszo, he visited Fernando de Castro at Madrid, who showed him his scientific drawings and his deep interest and knowledge in Art. The painter gifted this charbon portrait to the Spanish neuroscientist as a proof of the close frienship of both Miskolzy brothers and Fernando de Castro. (C) Madrid (Spain), December 1958, from the left to the right, Florencio Bustinza (1902–1982; born at Liverpool, pharmacologist and profesor of Biology at Madrid), Sir Howard Florey (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1945) and Fernando de Castro. Bustinza was personal friend of Sir Alexander Fleming and Sir Howard Florey since 1948, and Fernando de Castro kept frienship with the latter since his time at Cajal’s laboratory to learn histological technique during the mid 1920s, (A–C) are part of Archive Fernando de Castro.
Mentions: Because, indeed, Fernando de Castro was personally entrusted by Ramón y Cajal to direct the technical training and the research of all the fellows and researchers who arrived between 1924 and 1932 from the entire world to learn and work at the Cajal Institute, like, among many others, Deszö Miskolczy (1894–1978; considered as the father of Neuroscience in Hungary), Howard Florey (1898–1968; awarded with the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945), André Dewulf (Belgium), or Clemente Estable (1894–1976; Uruguay). A number of visitors became significant friends of Fernando de Castro (Figures 4B,C). Penfield did not formally work at Cajal’s laboratory, partly due to the so vaunted distancing between the Maestro and his disciple, as Penfield himself writes:

Bottom Line: Lawrentjew and the Spanish Fernando de Castro developed new technical approaches with spectacular results.In the mid of the 1920's, both young neuroscientists were worldwide recognized as the top experts in the field.Most of these discoveries remain fully alive today.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Grupo de Neurobiología del Desarrollo-GNDe, Instituto Cajal-CSIC Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The fine structure of the autonomic nervous system was largely unknown at the beginning of the second decade of the 20th century. Although relatively anatomists and histologists had studied the subject, even the assays by the great Russian histologist Alexander Dogiel and the Spanish Nobel Prize laureate, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, were incomplete. In a time which witnessed fundamental discoveries by Langley, Loewi and Dale on the physiology of the autonomic nervous system, both reputed researchers entrusted one of their outstanding disciples to the challenge to further investigate autonomic structures: the Russian B.I. Lawrentjew and the Spanish Fernando de Castro developed new technical approaches with spectacular results. In the mid of the 1920's, both young neuroscientists were worldwide recognized as the top experts in the field. In the present work we describe the main discoveries by Fernando de Castro in those years regarding the structure of sympathetic and sensory ganglia, the organization of the synaptic contacts in these ganglia, and the nature of their innervation, later materialized in their respective chapters, personally invited by the editor, in Wilder Penfield's famous textbook on Neurology and the Nervous System. Most of these discoveries remain fully alive today.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus