Limits...
Systematic review and meta-analysis of music interventions in hypertension treatment: a quest for answers.

Kühlmann AY, Etnel JR, Roos-Hesselink JW, Jeekel J, Bogers AJ, Takkenberg JJ - BMC Cardiovasc Disord (2016)

Bottom Line: A systematic literature search was conducted for publications on the effect of music interventions on blood pressure in adult hypertensive subjects published between January 1990-June 2014.This systematic review and meta-analysis revealed a trend towards a decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients who received music interventions, but failed to establish a cause-effect relationship between music interventions and blood pressure reduction.Considering the potential value of this safe, low-cost intervention, well-designed, high quality and sufficiently powered randomized studies assessing the efficacy of music interventions in the treatment of hypertension are warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Adverse effects, treatment resistance and high costs associated with pharmacological treatment of hypertension have led to growing interest in non-pharmacological complementary therapies such as music interventions. This meta-analysis aims to provide an overview of reported evidence on the efficacy of music interventions in the treatment of hypertension.

Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for publications on the effect of music interventions on blood pressure in adult hypertensive subjects published between January 1990-June 2014. Randomized controlled trials with a follow-up duration ≥28 days were included. Blood pressure measures were pooled using inverse variance weighting.

Results: Of the 1689 abstracts reviewed, 10 randomized controlled trials were included. Random-effects pooling of the music intervention groups showed a trend toward a decrease in mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) from 144 mmHg(95 % CI:137-152) to 134 mmHg(95 % CI:124-144), and in mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) from 84 mmHg(95 % CI:78-89) to 78 mmHg(95 % CI:73-84). Fixed-effect analysis of a subgroup of 3 trials with valid control groups showed a significant decrease in pooled mean SBP and DBP in both intervention and control groups. A comparison between music intervention groups and control groups was not possible due to unavailable measures of dispersion.

Conclusions: This systematic review and meta-analysis revealed a trend towards a decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients who received music interventions, but failed to establish a cause-effect relationship between music interventions and blood pressure reduction. Considering the potential value of this safe, low-cost intervention, well-designed, high quality and sufficiently powered randomized studies assessing the efficacy of music interventions in the treatment of hypertension are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean change in systolic blood pressure in different study-arms in the three comparative studies. SBP = systolic blood pressure
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837643&req=5

Fig2: Mean change in systolic blood pressure in different study-arms in the three comparative studies. SBP = systolic blood pressure

Mentions: Three of the ten included studies compared music interventions to a control group that received either standard medical therapy or a resting period [18–20]. Mean age of the patients in the control groups was 73.6 ± 7.8 years and 53 % were male. A medical history of hypertension was reported in 89 % of the patients. When comparing pooled mean SBP/DBP at baseline with pooled mean SBP/DBP at the end of the trial period in a random-effects model, a trend towards a decrease was found in pooled mean SBP and DBP in treatment as well as control groups, while fixed-effect analysis showed a significant decrease in both groups (Table 3). None of these 3 trials made a formal comparison of the observed reduction in blood pressure between the treatment and control groups. Although the magnitude of this reduction appeared to be greater in the experimental groups when represented graphically (Figs. 2 and 3), due to unavailable measures of dispersion a formal comparison of the mean reduction in SBP and DBP between the music interventions- and control group was not possible in this subgroup analysis.Table 3


Systematic review and meta-analysis of music interventions in hypertension treatment: a quest for answers.

Kühlmann AY, Etnel JR, Roos-Hesselink JW, Jeekel J, Bogers AJ, Takkenberg JJ - BMC Cardiovasc Disord (2016)

Mean change in systolic blood pressure in different study-arms in the three comparative studies. SBP = systolic blood pressure
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837643&req=5

Fig2: Mean change in systolic blood pressure in different study-arms in the three comparative studies. SBP = systolic blood pressure
Mentions: Three of the ten included studies compared music interventions to a control group that received either standard medical therapy or a resting period [18–20]. Mean age of the patients in the control groups was 73.6 ± 7.8 years and 53 % were male. A medical history of hypertension was reported in 89 % of the patients. When comparing pooled mean SBP/DBP at baseline with pooled mean SBP/DBP at the end of the trial period in a random-effects model, a trend towards a decrease was found in pooled mean SBP and DBP in treatment as well as control groups, while fixed-effect analysis showed a significant decrease in both groups (Table 3). None of these 3 trials made a formal comparison of the observed reduction in blood pressure between the treatment and control groups. Although the magnitude of this reduction appeared to be greater in the experimental groups when represented graphically (Figs. 2 and 3), due to unavailable measures of dispersion a formal comparison of the mean reduction in SBP and DBP between the music interventions- and control group was not possible in this subgroup analysis.Table 3

Bottom Line: A systematic literature search was conducted for publications on the effect of music interventions on blood pressure in adult hypertensive subjects published between January 1990-June 2014.This systematic review and meta-analysis revealed a trend towards a decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients who received music interventions, but failed to establish a cause-effect relationship between music interventions and blood pressure reduction.Considering the potential value of this safe, low-cost intervention, well-designed, high quality and sufficiently powered randomized studies assessing the efficacy of music interventions in the treatment of hypertension are warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Adverse effects, treatment resistance and high costs associated with pharmacological treatment of hypertension have led to growing interest in non-pharmacological complementary therapies such as music interventions. This meta-analysis aims to provide an overview of reported evidence on the efficacy of music interventions in the treatment of hypertension.

Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for publications on the effect of music interventions on blood pressure in adult hypertensive subjects published between January 1990-June 2014. Randomized controlled trials with a follow-up duration ≥28 days were included. Blood pressure measures were pooled using inverse variance weighting.

Results: Of the 1689 abstracts reviewed, 10 randomized controlled trials were included. Random-effects pooling of the music intervention groups showed a trend toward a decrease in mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) from 144 mmHg(95 % CI:137-152) to 134 mmHg(95 % CI:124-144), and in mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) from 84 mmHg(95 % CI:78-89) to 78 mmHg(95 % CI:73-84). Fixed-effect analysis of a subgroup of 3 trials with valid control groups showed a significant decrease in pooled mean SBP and DBP in both intervention and control groups. A comparison between music intervention groups and control groups was not possible due to unavailable measures of dispersion.

Conclusions: This systematic review and meta-analysis revealed a trend towards a decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive patients who received music interventions, but failed to establish a cause-effect relationship between music interventions and blood pressure reduction. Considering the potential value of this safe, low-cost intervention, well-designed, high quality and sufficiently powered randomized studies assessing the efficacy of music interventions in the treatment of hypertension are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus