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Health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to umbilical cord blood banking and donation: an integrative review.

Peberdy L, Young J, Kearney L - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2016)

Bottom Line: The search of the international literature identified nine papers which met review inclusion criteria.Further research should focus on understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals and how they communicate with expectant parents about this issue.In addition, how this knowledge influences professional practice around birth is also important, as this may positively or negatively impact the information that is provided to expectant parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia. Lisa.peberdy@research.usc.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Collection and storage of an infant's cord blood at birth is an option available to many new parents. Antenatal health care providers have an important role in providing non-biased and evidence based information to expectant parents about cord blood and tissue banking options. The aim of this paper was to identify and review studies of health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning cord blood banking and the sources by which healthcare professionals obtained their information on this topic.

Methods: An integrative review was conducted using several electronic databases to identify papers on health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to cord blood banking. The CASP tool was used to determine validity and quality of the studies included in the review.

Results: The search of the international literature identified nine papers which met review inclusion criteria. The literature review identified that there was little focus placed on antenatal health care professionals' knowledge of cord blood banking options despite these health care professionals being identified by expectant parents as their preferred, key source of information.

Conclusion: Limited high quality studies have investigated what health care professionals know and communicate to expectant parents regarding cord blood banking. Further research should focus on understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals and how they communicate with expectant parents about this issue. In addition, how this knowledge influences professional practice around birth is also important, as this may positively or negatively impact the information that is provided to expectant parents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screening and inclusion process
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Fig1: Screening and inclusion process

Mentions: Figure 1 details the structured search conducted, including search strategy and inclusion process applied to the peer reviewed literature which was included in this integrative review. This integrative review aimed to identify all available original studies of health care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and practices of cord blood banking and donation, and how these factors have been previously described. Publication dates were therefore inclusive of literature published between 1965 and August 2015 and no studies were excluded based on poor study quality. Due to resource limitations, articles were limited to those available with an English translation. The first author conducted the initial search and identified the potential papers for inclusion based on their title and abstract, with all papers for inclusion and exclusion discussed and agreed upon by all authors. Ethical review was not required for data accessed and included in this integrative review due to its availability in the published literature.Fig. 1


Health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to umbilical cord blood banking and donation: an integrative review.

Peberdy L, Young J, Kearney L - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2016)

Screening and inclusion process
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837592&req=5

Fig1: Screening and inclusion process
Mentions: Figure 1 details the structured search conducted, including search strategy and inclusion process applied to the peer reviewed literature which was included in this integrative review. This integrative review aimed to identify all available original studies of health care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and practices of cord blood banking and donation, and how these factors have been previously described. Publication dates were therefore inclusive of literature published between 1965 and August 2015 and no studies were excluded based on poor study quality. Due to resource limitations, articles were limited to those available with an English translation. The first author conducted the initial search and identified the potential papers for inclusion based on their title and abstract, with all papers for inclusion and exclusion discussed and agreed upon by all authors. Ethical review was not required for data accessed and included in this integrative review due to its availability in the published literature.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The search of the international literature identified nine papers which met review inclusion criteria.Further research should focus on understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals and how they communicate with expectant parents about this issue.In addition, how this knowledge influences professional practice around birth is also important, as this may positively or negatively impact the information that is provided to expectant parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia. Lisa.peberdy@research.usc.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Collection and storage of an infant's cord blood at birth is an option available to many new parents. Antenatal health care providers have an important role in providing non-biased and evidence based information to expectant parents about cord blood and tissue banking options. The aim of this paper was to identify and review studies of health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning cord blood banking and the sources by which healthcare professionals obtained their information on this topic.

Methods: An integrative review was conducted using several electronic databases to identify papers on health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to cord blood banking. The CASP tool was used to determine validity and quality of the studies included in the review.

Results: The search of the international literature identified nine papers which met review inclusion criteria. The literature review identified that there was little focus placed on antenatal health care professionals' knowledge of cord blood banking options despite these health care professionals being identified by expectant parents as their preferred, key source of information.

Conclusion: Limited high quality studies have investigated what health care professionals know and communicate to expectant parents regarding cord blood banking. Further research should focus on understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals and how they communicate with expectant parents about this issue. In addition, how this knowledge influences professional practice around birth is also important, as this may positively or negatively impact the information that is provided to expectant parents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus