Limits...
Exploring the factors that influence the decision to adopt and engage with an integrated assistive telehealth and telecare service in Cambridgeshire, UK: a nested qualitative study of patient 'users' and 'non-users'.

Cook EJ, Randhawa G, Sharp C, Ali N, Guppy A, Barton G, Bateman A, Crawford-White J - BMC Health Serv Res (2016)

Bottom Line: The findings also revealed that reassurance from the onset was paramount to continued engagement, particularly in older patients who appeared to have more negative feelings towards technology.In addition, there is a clear need for continued product development and innovation to not only increase usability and functionality of equipment but also to motivate other sections of the population who could benefit from such services.Uncovering these factors has important policy implications in how services can improve access and patient support through the application of assistive technology which could in turn reduce unnecessary cost and burden on overstretched health services.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Bedfordshire, Park Square, Luton, UK. erica.cook@beds.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a political drive in the UK to use assistive technologies such as telehealth and telecare as an innovative and efficient approach to healthcare delivery. However, the success of implementation of such services remains dependent on the ability to engage the wider population to adopt these services. It has been widely acknowledged that low acceptance of technology, forms a key barrier to adoption although findings been mixed. Further, it remains unclear what, if any barriers exist between patients and how these compare to those who have declined or withdrawn from using these technologies. This research aims to address this gap focusing on the UK based Cambridgeshire Community Services Assistive Telehealth and Telecare service, an integrated model of telehealth and telecare.

Methods: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted between 1st February 2014 and 1st December 2014, to explore the views and experiences of 'users' and 'non-users' using this service. 'Users' were defined as patients who used the service (N = 28) with 'non-users' defined as either referred patients who had declined the service before allocation (N = 3) or had withdrawn after using the ATT service (N = 9). Data were analysed using the Framework Method.

Results: This study revealed that there are a range of barriers and facilitators that impact on the decision to adopt and continue to engage with this type of service. Having a positive attitude and a perceived need that could be met by the ATT equipment were influential factors in the decision to adopt and engage in using the service. Engagement of the service centred on 'usability', 'usefulness of equipment', and 'threat to identity and independence'.

Conclusions: The paper described the influential role of referrers in decision-making and the need to engage with such agencies on a strategic level. The findings also revealed that reassurance from the onset was paramount to continued engagement, particularly in older patients who appeared to have more negative feelings towards technology. In addition, there is a clear need for continued product development and innovation to not only increase usability and functionality of equipment but also to motivate other sections of the population who could benefit from such services. Uncovering these factors has important policy implications in how services can improve access and patient support through the application of assistive technology which could in turn reduce unnecessary cost and burden on overstretched health services.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Recruitment pathway for ‘users’ and ‘non-users’
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837551&req=5

Fig1: Recruitment pathway for ‘users’ and ‘non-users’

Mentions: The ATT team posted participant information letters to all participants who met the inclusion criteria i.e. referred within the service evaluation period of 1stAug 2013 and 31st Jan 2014. All children were excluded (aged <18) alongside anyone who lacked mental capacity to consent. The invitation letter asked potential participants to state if they were either a) interested in taking part in the study and being interviewed, b) if they did not want to take part and c) wanted more information. If they replied, asking for more information a more detailed information sheet was posted out to them, with a follow up phone call. All participants who opted not to take part in the study were not contacted again and were immediately excluded. In situations where no response was received the interviewer phoned all potential participants to ask if they would be interested in taking part (Fig. 1). The interviewer (CH) then contacted all participants who agreed to be interviewed where an interview was arranged on a day/time which suited the patient. All interviews with patients were conducted in the environment of their choice, which was commonly within the patient’s or the carer’s home.Fig. 1


Exploring the factors that influence the decision to adopt and engage with an integrated assistive telehealth and telecare service in Cambridgeshire, UK: a nested qualitative study of patient 'users' and 'non-users'.

Cook EJ, Randhawa G, Sharp C, Ali N, Guppy A, Barton G, Bateman A, Crawford-White J - BMC Health Serv Res (2016)

Recruitment pathway for ‘users’ and ‘non-users’
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837551&req=5

Fig1: Recruitment pathway for ‘users’ and ‘non-users’
Mentions: The ATT team posted participant information letters to all participants who met the inclusion criteria i.e. referred within the service evaluation period of 1stAug 2013 and 31st Jan 2014. All children were excluded (aged <18) alongside anyone who lacked mental capacity to consent. The invitation letter asked potential participants to state if they were either a) interested in taking part in the study and being interviewed, b) if they did not want to take part and c) wanted more information. If they replied, asking for more information a more detailed information sheet was posted out to them, with a follow up phone call. All participants who opted not to take part in the study were not contacted again and were immediately excluded. In situations where no response was received the interviewer phoned all potential participants to ask if they would be interested in taking part (Fig. 1). The interviewer (CH) then contacted all participants who agreed to be interviewed where an interview was arranged on a day/time which suited the patient. All interviews with patients were conducted in the environment of their choice, which was commonly within the patient’s or the carer’s home.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The findings also revealed that reassurance from the onset was paramount to continued engagement, particularly in older patients who appeared to have more negative feelings towards technology.In addition, there is a clear need for continued product development and innovation to not only increase usability and functionality of equipment but also to motivate other sections of the population who could benefit from such services.Uncovering these factors has important policy implications in how services can improve access and patient support through the application of assistive technology which could in turn reduce unnecessary cost and burden on overstretched health services.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Bedfordshire, Park Square, Luton, UK. erica.cook@beds.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a political drive in the UK to use assistive technologies such as telehealth and telecare as an innovative and efficient approach to healthcare delivery. However, the success of implementation of such services remains dependent on the ability to engage the wider population to adopt these services. It has been widely acknowledged that low acceptance of technology, forms a key barrier to adoption although findings been mixed. Further, it remains unclear what, if any barriers exist between patients and how these compare to those who have declined or withdrawn from using these technologies. This research aims to address this gap focusing on the UK based Cambridgeshire Community Services Assistive Telehealth and Telecare service, an integrated model of telehealth and telecare.

Methods: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted between 1st February 2014 and 1st December 2014, to explore the views and experiences of 'users' and 'non-users' using this service. 'Users' were defined as patients who used the service (N = 28) with 'non-users' defined as either referred patients who had declined the service before allocation (N = 3) or had withdrawn after using the ATT service (N = 9). Data were analysed using the Framework Method.

Results: This study revealed that there are a range of barriers and facilitators that impact on the decision to adopt and continue to engage with this type of service. Having a positive attitude and a perceived need that could be met by the ATT equipment were influential factors in the decision to adopt and engage in using the service. Engagement of the service centred on 'usability', 'usefulness of equipment', and 'threat to identity and independence'.

Conclusions: The paper described the influential role of referrers in decision-making and the need to engage with such agencies on a strategic level. The findings also revealed that reassurance from the onset was paramount to continued engagement, particularly in older patients who appeared to have more negative feelings towards technology. In addition, there is a clear need for continued product development and innovation to not only increase usability and functionality of equipment but also to motivate other sections of the population who could benefit from such services. Uncovering these factors has important policy implications in how services can improve access and patient support through the application of assistive technology which could in turn reduce unnecessary cost and burden on overstretched health services.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus