Limits...
Temporal decorrelation by SK channels enables efficient neural coding and perception of natural stimuli.

Huang CG, Zhang ZD, Chacron MJ - Nat Commun (2016)

Bottom Line: However, the mechanisms by which such efficient processing is achieved, and the consequences for perception and behaviour remain poorly understood.Specifically, these channels allow for the high-pass filtering of sensory input, thereby removing temporal correlations or, equivalently, whitening frequency response power.Our results thus demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the nervous system can implement efficient processing and perception of natural sensory input that is likely to be shared across systems and species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, McGill University, 3655 Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1Y6.

ABSTRACT
It is commonly assumed that neural systems efficiently process natural sensory input. However, the mechanisms by which such efficient processing is achieved, and the consequences for perception and behaviour remain poorly understood. Here we show that small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels enable efficient neural processing and perception of natural stimuli. Specifically, these channels allow for the high-pass filtering of sensory input, thereby removing temporal correlations or, equivalently, whitening frequency response power. Varying the degree of adaptation through pharmacological manipulation of SK channels reduced efficiency of coding of natural stimuli, which in turn gave rise to predictable changes in behavioural responses that were no longer matched to natural stimulus statistics. Our results thus demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the nervous system can implement efficient processing and perception of natural sensory input that is likely to be shared across systems and species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Temporal decorrelation of natural stimuli by electrosensory pyramidal neurons.(a) Schematic representation showing the awake behaving preparation where a stimulus is presented to the animal while neural activity is being recorded. Shown on the right are: example AM waveform (magenta), its envelope (blue), and the full signal received by the animal (green) with their respective frequency contents. (b) Natural envelope stimulus (blue) as well as the firing rate (middle) and spiking (bottom) response of a typical ELL pyramidal neuron. (c) Stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response power spectrum. Note the flattening of the response spectrum (black arrow). The grey band shows one s.e.m. Inset: stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response autocorrelation function. Note that the neural autocorrelation function decays to zero much faster than that of the stimulus (black arrow). The grey band shows the 95% confidence interval around zero. (d, left) Correlation time for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). (right) White index for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). ‘**' indicates statistical significance at the P=0.01 level using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test with N=14.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837484&req=5

f1: Temporal decorrelation of natural stimuli by electrosensory pyramidal neurons.(a) Schematic representation showing the awake behaving preparation where a stimulus is presented to the animal while neural activity is being recorded. Shown on the right are: example AM waveform (magenta), its envelope (blue), and the full signal received by the animal (green) with their respective frequency contents. (b) Natural envelope stimulus (blue) as well as the firing rate (middle) and spiking (bottom) response of a typical ELL pyramidal neuron. (c) Stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response power spectrum. Note the flattening of the response spectrum (black arrow). The grey band shows one s.e.m. Inset: stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response autocorrelation function. Note that the neural autocorrelation function decays to zero much faster than that of the stimulus (black arrow). The grey band shows the 95% confidence interval around zero. (d, left) Correlation time for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). (right) White index for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). ‘**' indicates statistical significance at the P=0.01 level using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test with N=14.

Mentions: We recorded ELL pyramidal neuron responses to stimuli (n=14) in awake and behaving animals (Fig. 1a). Our stimuli consisted of a fast time-varying waveform (first-order) with a slow time-varying amplitude (that is, the envelope or second-order) as encountered under natural conditions1518. Figure 1a shows an example AM waveform (magenta), its envelope (blue), as well as the full signal received by the animal (green) with respective frequency content. It is important to realize that the animal's unmodulated EOD is a carrier and that the meaningful stimulus here is the EOD AM. Thus, we note that the first- and second-order features of the stimulus actually correspond to the second- and third-order features of the full signal received by the animal, respectively.


Temporal decorrelation by SK channels enables efficient neural coding and perception of natural stimuli.

Huang CG, Zhang ZD, Chacron MJ - Nat Commun (2016)

Temporal decorrelation of natural stimuli by electrosensory pyramidal neurons.(a) Schematic representation showing the awake behaving preparation where a stimulus is presented to the animal while neural activity is being recorded. Shown on the right are: example AM waveform (magenta), its envelope (blue), and the full signal received by the animal (green) with their respective frequency contents. (b) Natural envelope stimulus (blue) as well as the firing rate (middle) and spiking (bottom) response of a typical ELL pyramidal neuron. (c) Stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response power spectrum. Note the flattening of the response spectrum (black arrow). The grey band shows one s.e.m. Inset: stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response autocorrelation function. Note that the neural autocorrelation function decays to zero much faster than that of the stimulus (black arrow). The grey band shows the 95% confidence interval around zero. (d, left) Correlation time for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). (right) White index for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). ‘**' indicates statistical significance at the P=0.01 level using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test with N=14.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837484&req=5

f1: Temporal decorrelation of natural stimuli by electrosensory pyramidal neurons.(a) Schematic representation showing the awake behaving preparation where a stimulus is presented to the animal while neural activity is being recorded. Shown on the right are: example AM waveform (magenta), its envelope (blue), and the full signal received by the animal (green) with their respective frequency contents. (b) Natural envelope stimulus (blue) as well as the firing rate (middle) and spiking (bottom) response of a typical ELL pyramidal neuron. (c) Stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response power spectrum. Note the flattening of the response spectrum (black arrow). The grey band shows one s.e.m. Inset: stimulus (blue), and population-averaged (red) neural response autocorrelation function. Note that the neural autocorrelation function decays to zero much faster than that of the stimulus (black arrow). The grey band shows the 95% confidence interval around zero. (d, left) Correlation time for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). (right) White index for the stimulus (blue) and neural response (red). ‘**' indicates statistical significance at the P=0.01 level using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test with N=14.
Mentions: We recorded ELL pyramidal neuron responses to stimuli (n=14) in awake and behaving animals (Fig. 1a). Our stimuli consisted of a fast time-varying waveform (first-order) with a slow time-varying amplitude (that is, the envelope or second-order) as encountered under natural conditions1518. Figure 1a shows an example AM waveform (magenta), its envelope (blue), as well as the full signal received by the animal (green) with respective frequency content. It is important to realize that the animal's unmodulated EOD is a carrier and that the meaningful stimulus here is the EOD AM. Thus, we note that the first- and second-order features of the stimulus actually correspond to the second- and third-order features of the full signal received by the animal, respectively.

Bottom Line: However, the mechanisms by which such efficient processing is achieved, and the consequences for perception and behaviour remain poorly understood.Specifically, these channels allow for the high-pass filtering of sensory input, thereby removing temporal correlations or, equivalently, whitening frequency response power.Our results thus demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the nervous system can implement efficient processing and perception of natural sensory input that is likely to be shared across systems and species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, McGill University, 3655 Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1Y6.

ABSTRACT
It is commonly assumed that neural systems efficiently process natural sensory input. However, the mechanisms by which such efficient processing is achieved, and the consequences for perception and behaviour remain poorly understood. Here we show that small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels enable efficient neural processing and perception of natural stimuli. Specifically, these channels allow for the high-pass filtering of sensory input, thereby removing temporal correlations or, equivalently, whitening frequency response power. Varying the degree of adaptation through pharmacological manipulation of SK channels reduced efficiency of coding of natural stimuli, which in turn gave rise to predictable changes in behavioural responses that were no longer matched to natural stimulus statistics. Our results thus demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the nervous system can implement efficient processing and perception of natural sensory input that is likely to be shared across systems and species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus