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Experimental perfect state transfer of an entangled photonic qubit.

Chapman RJ, Santandrea M, Huang Z, Corrielli G, Crespi A, Yung MH, Osellame R, Peruzzo A - Nat Commun (2016)

Bottom Line: On a single device we perform three routing procedures on entangled states, preserving the encoded quantum state with an average fidelity of 97.1%, measuring in the coincidence basis.Our protocol extends the regular perfect state transfer by maintaining quantum information encoded in the polarization state of the photonic qubit.Our results demonstrate the key principle of perfect state transfer, opening a route towards data transfer for quantum computing systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Quantum Photonics Laboratory, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The transfer of data is a fundamental task in information systems. Microprocessors contain dedicated data buses that transmit bits across different locations and implement sophisticated routing protocols. Transferring quantum information with high fidelity is a challenging task, due to the intrinsic fragility of quantum states. Here we report on the implementation of the perfect state transfer protocol applied to a photonic qubit entangled with another qubit at a different location. On a single device we perform three routing procedures on entangled states, preserving the encoded quantum state with an average fidelity of 97.1%, measuring in the coincidence basis. Our protocol extends the regular perfect state transfer by maintaining quantum information encoded in the polarization state of the photonic qubit. Our results demonstrate the key principle of perfect state transfer, opening a route towards data transfer for quantum computing systems.

No MeSH data available.


Propagation simulations with different coupling coefficient spectra.(a) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides with the Hamiltonian in equation (1) and a uniform coupling coefficient spectrum. With the constraint that reflections off boundaries are not allowed, we calculate a maximum probability of transferring the photon to waveguide 11 of 78.1% (ref. 2). (b) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides, this time with the coupling coefficient spectrum of equation (2). After evolution for a pre-determined time, the photon is received at waveguide 11 with 100% probability34567.
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f2: Propagation simulations with different coupling coefficient spectra.(a) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides with the Hamiltonian in equation (1) and a uniform coupling coefficient spectrum. With the constraint that reflections off boundaries are not allowed, we calculate a maximum probability of transferring the photon to waveguide 11 of 78.1% (ref. 2). (b) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides, this time with the coupling coefficient spectrum of equation (2). After evolution for a pre-determined time, the photon is received at waveguide 11 with 100% probability34567.

Mentions: where Cn,n+1 is the coupling coefficient between waveguides n and n+1, and is the annihilation (creation) operator applied to waveguide n and polarization σ (horizontal or vertical). Hamiltonian evolution of a state for a time t is calculated via the Schrödinger equation, giving the final state (ref. 49). Equation (1) is constructed of independent tight-binding Hamiltonians acting on each orthogonal polarization. This requires there to be no cross-talk terms or . The spectrum of coupling coefficients Cn,n+1 is crucial for successful PST. Evolution of this Hamiltonian with a uniform coupling coefficient spectrum, equivalent to equally spaced waveguides, is not sufficient for PST with over three lattice sites as simulated in Fig. 2a. PST requires the coupling coefficient spectrum to follow the function


Experimental perfect state transfer of an entangled photonic qubit.

Chapman RJ, Santandrea M, Huang Z, Corrielli G, Crespi A, Yung MH, Osellame R, Peruzzo A - Nat Commun (2016)

Propagation simulations with different coupling coefficient spectra.(a) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides with the Hamiltonian in equation (1) and a uniform coupling coefficient spectrum. With the constraint that reflections off boundaries are not allowed, we calculate a maximum probability of transferring the photon to waveguide 11 of 78.1% (ref. 2). (b) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides, this time with the coupling coefficient spectrum of equation (2). After evolution for a pre-determined time, the photon is received at waveguide 11 with 100% probability34567.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837480&req=5

f2: Propagation simulations with different coupling coefficient spectra.(a) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides with the Hamiltonian in equation (1) and a uniform coupling coefficient spectrum. With the constraint that reflections off boundaries are not allowed, we calculate a maximum probability of transferring the photon to waveguide 11 of 78.1% (ref. 2). (b) A photon is injected into the first waveguide of an array of eleven coupled waveguides, this time with the coupling coefficient spectrum of equation (2). After evolution for a pre-determined time, the photon is received at waveguide 11 with 100% probability34567.
Mentions: where Cn,n+1 is the coupling coefficient between waveguides n and n+1, and is the annihilation (creation) operator applied to waveguide n and polarization σ (horizontal or vertical). Hamiltonian evolution of a state for a time t is calculated via the Schrödinger equation, giving the final state (ref. 49). Equation (1) is constructed of independent tight-binding Hamiltonians acting on each orthogonal polarization. This requires there to be no cross-talk terms or . The spectrum of coupling coefficients Cn,n+1 is crucial for successful PST. Evolution of this Hamiltonian with a uniform coupling coefficient spectrum, equivalent to equally spaced waveguides, is not sufficient for PST with over three lattice sites as simulated in Fig. 2a. PST requires the coupling coefficient spectrum to follow the function

Bottom Line: On a single device we perform three routing procedures on entangled states, preserving the encoded quantum state with an average fidelity of 97.1%, measuring in the coincidence basis.Our protocol extends the regular perfect state transfer by maintaining quantum information encoded in the polarization state of the photonic qubit.Our results demonstrate the key principle of perfect state transfer, opening a route towards data transfer for quantum computing systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Quantum Photonics Laboratory, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The transfer of data is a fundamental task in information systems. Microprocessors contain dedicated data buses that transmit bits across different locations and implement sophisticated routing protocols. Transferring quantum information with high fidelity is a challenging task, due to the intrinsic fragility of quantum states. Here we report on the implementation of the perfect state transfer protocol applied to a photonic qubit entangled with another qubit at a different location. On a single device we perform three routing procedures on entangled states, preserving the encoded quantum state with an average fidelity of 97.1%, measuring in the coincidence basis. Our protocol extends the regular perfect state transfer by maintaining quantum information encoded in the polarization state of the photonic qubit. Our results demonstrate the key principle of perfect state transfer, opening a route towards data transfer for quantum computing systems.

No MeSH data available.