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Non-replication of the association between 5HTTLPR and response to psychological therapy for child anxiety disorders.

Lester KJ, Roberts S, Keers R, Coleman JR, Breen G, Wong CC, Xu X, Arendt K, Blatter-Meunier J, Bögels S, Cooper P, Creswell C, Heiervang ER, Herren C, Hogendoorn SM, Hudson JL, Krause K, Lyneham HJ, McKinnon A, Morris T, Nauta MH, Rapee RM, Rey Y, Schneider S, Schneider SC, Silverman WK, Smith P, Thastum M, Thirlwall K, Waite P, Wergeland GJ, Eley TC - Br J Psychiatry (2015)

Bottom Line: There was no significant effect of 5HTTLPR on CBT outcomes in Cohort 2.Short-allele homozygotes showed more positive treatment outcomes, but with small, non-significant effects.Future studies would benefit from utilising whole genome approaches and large, homogenous samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kathryn J. Lester, DPhil, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, and King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Susanna Roberts, MSc, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Robert Keers, PhD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Jonathan R. I. Coleman, MSc, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Gerome Breen, PhD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK and National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, South London and Maudsley National Health Service Trust, UK; Chloe C. Y. Wong, PhD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Xiaohui Xu, MD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Kristian Arendt, MSc, Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; Judith Blatter-Meunier, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Susan Bögels, PhD, Research Institute Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Peter Cooper, DPhil, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, UK and Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa; Cathy Creswell, DClinPsy, PhD, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, U

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Remission rates and response to cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT).Figure 1(a) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Figure 1(b) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Genotype was not significantly associated with any outcome measure (P>0.05 for all analyses). Figure 1(c) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Figure 1(d) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Genotype was not significantly associated with primary anxiety remission or response (P>0.05 for all analyses), but those homozygous for the short allele showed a significantly greater remission for all anxiety disorders in the combined sample, even when clinical covariates were taken into account (*OR = 0.45, P = 0.014).
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Figure 1: Remission rates and response to cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT).Figure 1(a) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Figure 1(b) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Genotype was not significantly associated with any outcome measure (P>0.05 for all analyses). Figure 1(c) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Figure 1(d) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Genotype was not significantly associated with primary anxiety remission or response (P>0.05 for all analyses), but those homozygous for the short allele showed a significantly greater remission for all anxiety disorders in the combined sample, even when clinical covariates were taken into account (*OR = 0.45, P = 0.014).

Mentions: Remission rates are given in Table 1 and were marginally higher than in previous studies,3 with 61.1% of children remitting from their primary anxiety disorder after treatment, and 71.8% by follow-up. There were no significant differences between remitters and non-remitters for age and gender (age: primary t(604) = −0.16, P = 0.874; all anxiety t(570) = −0.76, P = 0.449; gender: primary χ21 = 0.42, P = 0.515; all anxiety χ21 = 0.47, P = 0.492). Outcome data by genotype are also given in Table 1 for the additive model, and Fig. 1 shows outcomes for the recessive model. Individuals with the SS genotype were 1.7% more likely than those with SL/LL genotype to remit from their primary anxiety diagnosis and 6.5% more likely to remit from all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up. However, differences between the groups were not statistically significant.


Non-replication of the association between 5HTTLPR and response to psychological therapy for child anxiety disorders.

Lester KJ, Roberts S, Keers R, Coleman JR, Breen G, Wong CC, Xu X, Arendt K, Blatter-Meunier J, Bögels S, Cooper P, Creswell C, Heiervang ER, Herren C, Hogendoorn SM, Hudson JL, Krause K, Lyneham HJ, McKinnon A, Morris T, Nauta MH, Rapee RM, Rey Y, Schneider S, Schneider SC, Silverman WK, Smith P, Thastum M, Thirlwall K, Waite P, Wergeland GJ, Eley TC - Br J Psychiatry (2015)

Remission rates and response to cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT).Figure 1(a) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Figure 1(b) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Genotype was not significantly associated with any outcome measure (P>0.05 for all analyses). Figure 1(c) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Figure 1(d) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Genotype was not significantly associated with primary anxiety remission or response (P>0.05 for all analyses), but those homozygous for the short allele showed a significantly greater remission for all anxiety disorders in the combined sample, even when clinical covariates were taken into account (*OR = 0.45, P = 0.014).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837384&req=5

Figure 1: Remission rates and response to cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT).Figure 1(a) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Figure 1(b) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in Cohort 2. Genotype was not significantly associated with any outcome measure (P>0.05 for all analyses). Figure 1(c) shows the proportion of children free of their primary anxiety disorder and all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up, split by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Figure 1(d) shows the change in primary anxiety symptom severity rating across the course of treatment by 5HTTLPR genotype in the combined sample. Genotype was not significantly associated with primary anxiety remission or response (P>0.05 for all analyses), but those homozygous for the short allele showed a significantly greater remission for all anxiety disorders in the combined sample, even when clinical covariates were taken into account (*OR = 0.45, P = 0.014).
Mentions: Remission rates are given in Table 1 and were marginally higher than in previous studies,3 with 61.1% of children remitting from their primary anxiety disorder after treatment, and 71.8% by follow-up. There were no significant differences between remitters and non-remitters for age and gender (age: primary t(604) = −0.16, P = 0.874; all anxiety t(570) = −0.76, P = 0.449; gender: primary χ21 = 0.42, P = 0.515; all anxiety χ21 = 0.47, P = 0.492). Outcome data by genotype are also given in Table 1 for the additive model, and Fig. 1 shows outcomes for the recessive model. Individuals with the SS genotype were 1.7% more likely than those with SL/LL genotype to remit from their primary anxiety diagnosis and 6.5% more likely to remit from all anxiety diagnoses at follow-up. However, differences between the groups were not statistically significant.

Bottom Line: There was no significant effect of 5HTTLPR on CBT outcomes in Cohort 2.Short-allele homozygotes showed more positive treatment outcomes, but with small, non-significant effects.Future studies would benefit from utilising whole genome approaches and large, homogenous samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kathryn J. Lester, DPhil, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, and King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Susanna Roberts, MSc, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Robert Keers, PhD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Jonathan R. I. Coleman, MSc, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Gerome Breen, PhD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK and National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, South London and Maudsley National Health Service Trust, UK; Chloe C. Y. Wong, PhD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Xiaohui Xu, MD, King's College London, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK; Kristian Arendt, MSc, Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; Judith Blatter-Meunier, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Susan Bögels, PhD, Research Institute Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Peter Cooper, DPhil, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, UK and Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa; Cathy Creswell, DClinPsy, PhD, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, U

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus