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Substantial dust loss of bioavailable phosphorus from agricultural soils.

Katra I, Gross A, Swet N, Tanner S, Krasnov H, Angert A - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use.The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km(-2)) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production.Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Geography and Environmental Development, Be'er-Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in terrestrial ecosystems. Knowledge on the role of dust in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very limited with no quantitative information on aeolian (by wind) P fluxes from soils. The aim of this study is to focus on P cycling via dust emissions under common land-use practices in an arid environment by integration of sample analyses and aeolian experiments. The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use. Even in a single wind-dust event at moderate velocity (7.0 m s(-1)), P flux in conventional agricultural fields can reach 1.83 kg km(-2), that accumulates to a considerable amount per year at a regional scale. The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km(-2)) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production. In grazing areas where no P nutrition is applied, the soil degradation process can lead to desertification. Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Balance of P amounts per year (kg km−2) in the topsoils.A–balance for natural reserve (Nn) and open grazing area (Gn) with the impact of a short-term disturbance of the topsoil (Nd and Gd). B–balance for crop fields under organic (On-no grazing, Om-medium grazing, Os-strong grazing) and conventional (Cn-no tillage, Cd-disk tillage, Cc-cultivator tillage). Note the differences in the scale values of Y axes.
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f3: Balance of P amounts per year (kg km−2) in the topsoils.A–balance for natural reserve (Nn) and open grazing area (Gn) with the impact of a short-term disturbance of the topsoil (Nd and Gd). B–balance for crop fields under organic (On-no grazing, Om-medium grazing, Os-strong grazing) and conventional (Cn-no tillage, Cd-disk tillage, Cc-cultivator tillage). Note the differences in the scale values of Y axes.

Mentions: Overall the results show the potential of significant reduction in P content per year in all soils under the conditions of a short-term disturbance and wind velocity of 7 m s−1. It was demonstrated that even in a single wind event of several minutes the soil can lose a considerable amount of P by dust emission, considering the high P concentrations in the soil PM10 fraction (Table 2). For example, in conventional agricultural soils with mechanical operation (Cc), the P emission can sum to 1.83 kg km−2 in a 5-minute wind event. Considering tens and hundreds square kilometers of such soils in the studied regions, a significant amount of P is lost and loaded into the atmosphere in a single wind event. Based on the experimental results, a yearly balance between the output and input of P in the topsoils was calculated (Fig. 3). The results clearly show a negative balance in the P content in all the soils that are subjected to agricultural activities as grazing and field crops. It can be assumed that in the conventional agricultural fields, soil fertilization by P is needed above the crop-uptake rates to maintain efficient yield production. In other land uses were no P nutrition is applied (e.g. G plots), the negative balance in P amount can indicate a soil degradation process over time towards desertification. According to our lowest estimations for harvested (crop) fields that are exposed to wind erosion, the P flux per year (dry season June-October) is ~40 kg km−2. At a regional scale this sums up to a significant amount of P loading to the atmosphere, especially when mechanical or grazing operations are applied in the P sources (Fig. 3). The results highlight the role of dust in the P cycle, but also the complexity in quantifying P loss from soil and its atmospheric loading. The results can reduce uncertainties in dust emission models from complex surfaces and atmospheric P transport from dust sources. The study further provides a better understanding on the soil nutrition status and the potential of P emission as well as other nutrients absorbance to soil particles (e.g., potassium, nitrogen) which is key to developing proper nutrient resource management strategies.


Substantial dust loss of bioavailable phosphorus from agricultural soils.

Katra I, Gross A, Swet N, Tanner S, Krasnov H, Angert A - Sci Rep (2016)

Balance of P amounts per year (kg km−2) in the topsoils.A–balance for natural reserve (Nn) and open grazing area (Gn) with the impact of a short-term disturbance of the topsoil (Nd and Gd). B–balance for crop fields under organic (On-no grazing, Om-medium grazing, Os-strong grazing) and conventional (Cn-no tillage, Cd-disk tillage, Cc-cultivator tillage). Note the differences in the scale values of Y axes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837371&req=5

f3: Balance of P amounts per year (kg km−2) in the topsoils.A–balance for natural reserve (Nn) and open grazing area (Gn) with the impact of a short-term disturbance of the topsoil (Nd and Gd). B–balance for crop fields under organic (On-no grazing, Om-medium grazing, Os-strong grazing) and conventional (Cn-no tillage, Cd-disk tillage, Cc-cultivator tillage). Note the differences in the scale values of Y axes.
Mentions: Overall the results show the potential of significant reduction in P content per year in all soils under the conditions of a short-term disturbance and wind velocity of 7 m s−1. It was demonstrated that even in a single wind event of several minutes the soil can lose a considerable amount of P by dust emission, considering the high P concentrations in the soil PM10 fraction (Table 2). For example, in conventional agricultural soils with mechanical operation (Cc), the P emission can sum to 1.83 kg km−2 in a 5-minute wind event. Considering tens and hundreds square kilometers of such soils in the studied regions, a significant amount of P is lost and loaded into the atmosphere in a single wind event. Based on the experimental results, a yearly balance between the output and input of P in the topsoils was calculated (Fig. 3). The results clearly show a negative balance in the P content in all the soils that are subjected to agricultural activities as grazing and field crops. It can be assumed that in the conventional agricultural fields, soil fertilization by P is needed above the crop-uptake rates to maintain efficient yield production. In other land uses were no P nutrition is applied (e.g. G plots), the negative balance in P amount can indicate a soil degradation process over time towards desertification. According to our lowest estimations for harvested (crop) fields that are exposed to wind erosion, the P flux per year (dry season June-October) is ~40 kg km−2. At a regional scale this sums up to a significant amount of P loading to the atmosphere, especially when mechanical or grazing operations are applied in the P sources (Fig. 3). The results highlight the role of dust in the P cycle, but also the complexity in quantifying P loss from soil and its atmospheric loading. The results can reduce uncertainties in dust emission models from complex surfaces and atmospheric P transport from dust sources. The study further provides a better understanding on the soil nutrition status and the potential of P emission as well as other nutrients absorbance to soil particles (e.g., potassium, nitrogen) which is key to developing proper nutrient resource management strategies.

Bottom Line: The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use.The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km(-2)) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production.Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Geography and Environmental Development, Be'er-Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in terrestrial ecosystems. Knowledge on the role of dust in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very limited with no quantitative information on aeolian (by wind) P fluxes from soils. The aim of this study is to focus on P cycling via dust emissions under common land-use practices in an arid environment by integration of sample analyses and aeolian experiments. The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use. Even in a single wind-dust event at moderate velocity (7.0 m s(-1)), P flux in conventional agricultural fields can reach 1.83 kg km(-2), that accumulates to a considerable amount per year at a regional scale. The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km(-2)) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production. In grazing areas where no P nutrition is applied, the soil degradation process can lead to desertification. Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus