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The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum.

Alexandrov GA, Brovkin VA, Kleinen T - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system.They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source.Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyzhevsky 3, Moscow, 119017, Russia.

ABSTRACT
Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Western Siberia climate during LGM (left) and at present (right) derived from the monthly precipitation and monthly temperature simulated by the MPI-ESM (refs 20, 21).P is annual precipitation, in mm/yr. BT is biotemperature (ref. 22), the sum of positive monthly temperatures divided by 12. P/PET is the ratio of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration calculated from monthly temperature using the Thornthwaite method (ref. 37). Made with MapWindow 4.8.8 (http://www.mapwindow.org/), Natural Earth public domain map data (http://www.naturalearthdata.com/about/terms-of-use/), and map colors from www.ColorBrewer.org.
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f1: Western Siberia climate during LGM (left) and at present (right) derived from the monthly precipitation and monthly temperature simulated by the MPI-ESM (refs 20, 21).P is annual precipitation, in mm/yr. BT is biotemperature (ref. 22), the sum of positive monthly temperatures divided by 12. P/PET is the ratio of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration calculated from monthly temperature using the Thornthwaite method (ref. 37). Made with MapWindow 4.8.8 (http://www.mapwindow.org/), Natural Earth public domain map data (http://www.naturalearthdata.com/about/terms-of-use/), and map colors from www.ColorBrewer.org.

Mentions: The absence of peatlands in Western Siberia during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)16 is one of the puzzles waiting to be solved. At present, the territory of Western Siberia is densely covered by peatlands17. However, very few of them initiated between 18,000 and 11,000 years before present (BP): mostly, paludification of Western Siberia started 11,000 years BP18. This late start of peatlands expansion was not seen as a puzzle several decades ago, because it was wrongly assumed then that an ice sheet covered Western Siberia. However, more recent findings show that Western Siberia was in fact ice-free during the last glacial19. Simulations of LGM climate performed with the Max Planck Institute - Earth System Model (MPI-ESM)2021 suggest, as one can see in Fig. 1, that climatic conditions were neither extremely dry nor extremely cold. In terms of Holdridge life zones22, they were similar to moist tundra or moist boreal forest for the major part of Western Siberia. Peatlands are common in these life zones at present23.


The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum.

Alexandrov GA, Brovkin VA, Kleinen T - Sci Rep (2016)

Western Siberia climate during LGM (left) and at present (right) derived from the monthly precipitation and monthly temperature simulated by the MPI-ESM (refs 20, 21).P is annual precipitation, in mm/yr. BT is biotemperature (ref. 22), the sum of positive monthly temperatures divided by 12. P/PET is the ratio of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration calculated from monthly temperature using the Thornthwaite method (ref. 37). Made with MapWindow 4.8.8 (http://www.mapwindow.org/), Natural Earth public domain map data (http://www.naturalearthdata.com/about/terms-of-use/), and map colors from www.ColorBrewer.org.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837369&req=5

f1: Western Siberia climate during LGM (left) and at present (right) derived from the monthly precipitation and monthly temperature simulated by the MPI-ESM (refs 20, 21).P is annual precipitation, in mm/yr. BT is biotemperature (ref. 22), the sum of positive monthly temperatures divided by 12. P/PET is the ratio of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration calculated from monthly temperature using the Thornthwaite method (ref. 37). Made with MapWindow 4.8.8 (http://www.mapwindow.org/), Natural Earth public domain map data (http://www.naturalearthdata.com/about/terms-of-use/), and map colors from www.ColorBrewer.org.
Mentions: The absence of peatlands in Western Siberia during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)16 is one of the puzzles waiting to be solved. At present, the territory of Western Siberia is densely covered by peatlands17. However, very few of them initiated between 18,000 and 11,000 years before present (BP): mostly, paludification of Western Siberia started 11,000 years BP18. This late start of peatlands expansion was not seen as a puzzle several decades ago, because it was wrongly assumed then that an ice sheet covered Western Siberia. However, more recent findings show that Western Siberia was in fact ice-free during the last glacial19. Simulations of LGM climate performed with the Max Planck Institute - Earth System Model (MPI-ESM)2021 suggest, as one can see in Fig. 1, that climatic conditions were neither extremely dry nor extremely cold. In terms of Holdridge life zones22, they were similar to moist tundra or moist boreal forest for the major part of Western Siberia. Peatlands are common in these life zones at present23.

Bottom Line: Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system.They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source.Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyzhevsky 3, Moscow, 119017, Russia.

ABSTRACT
Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus