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Nanodroplet-Vaporization-Assisted Sonoporation for Highly Effective Delivery of Photothermal Treatment.

Liu WW, Liu SW, Liou YR, Wu YH, Yang YC, Wang CR, Li PC - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: This study used nanodroplets to significantly enhance the effectiveness of sonoporation relative to using conventional microbubbles.Enhanced cavitation also leads to significant enhancement of the sonoporation effects.Our in vivo results show that nanodroplet-vaporization-assisted sonoporation can increase the treatment temperature by more than 10 °C above that achieved by microbubble-based sonoporation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei 106, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Sonoporation refers to the use of ultrasound and acoustic cavitation to temporarily enhance the permeability of cellular membranes so as to enhance the delivery efficiency of therapeutic agents into cells. Microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents are often used to facilitate these cavitation effects. This study used nanodroplets to significantly enhance the effectiveness of sonoporation relative to using conventional microbubbles. Significant enhancements were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo by using gold nanorods encapsulated in nanodroplets for implementing plasmonic photothermal therapy. Combined excitation by ultrasound and laser radiation is used to trigger the gold nanodroplets to induce a liquid-to-gas phase change, which induces cavitation effects that are three-to-fivefold stronger than when using conventional microbubbles. Enhanced cavitation also leads to significant enhancement of the sonoporation effects. Our in vivo results show that nanodroplet-vaporization-assisted sonoporation can increase the treatment temperature by more than 10 °C above that achieved by microbubble-based sonoporation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Enhanced therapeutic efficiency in tumors with AuNDs-assisted PPTT.Ultrasound B-mode imaging at the indicated treatment days shows that when tumors exposed to laser radiation and ultrasound simultaneously, the enhanced PPTT efficiency was observed in tumors loaded with AuNDs in compare to tumors loaded with AuMBs or without contrast agent loading.
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f7: Enhanced therapeutic efficiency in tumors with AuNDs-assisted PPTT.Ultrasound B-mode imaging at the indicated treatment days shows that when tumors exposed to laser radiation and ultrasound simultaneously, the enhanced PPTT efficiency was observed in tumors loaded with AuNDs in compare to tumors loaded with AuMBs or without contrast agent loading.

Mentions: The implanted tumor was monitored using B-mode imaging every 7 days during PPTT. The images in the top row of Fig. 7 show that AuNDs-treated tumors exhibited a larger scale of injury after PPTT for 14 days compared to the tumors without AuNDs treatment. According to the B-mode image of an AuNDs-treated tumor, such large-scale injury effectively caused the tumor tissue to contract and deform due to thermal denaturation of protein induced by PPTT-induced heating. One week later (on day 21), an obvious scar had formed on the AuNDs-treated tumor, which resulted in a severe imaging artifact appearance during the B-mode imaging. Although a scar that also formed in the tumor without AuNDs treatment generated a small ultrasound imaging artifact, that scar was smaller and it was clearly evident that not all of the tumor tissue had been successfully damaged. After applying PPTT to the implanted tumors for 1.5 months (day 42), the AuNDs-treated tumor was fully cured, whereas the tumor that had not received AuNDs treatment had relapsed and actually enlarged. The similar findings were also found in compared the AuNDs-treated tumor with AuMBs-treated tumor, which the AuNDs-treated tumor was fully cured, whereas the AuMBs-treated one was relapsed and enlarged after applying PPTT. These data demonstrate that treating a tumor with AuNDs followed by PPTT severely damages tumor tissue and thus successfully destroys the tumor, while a tumor that does not receive AuNDs treatment or treats with AuMBs displays comparatively minor damage that cannot destroy it.


Nanodroplet-Vaporization-Assisted Sonoporation for Highly Effective Delivery of Photothermal Treatment.

Liu WW, Liu SW, Liou YR, Wu YH, Yang YC, Wang CR, Li PC - Sci Rep (2016)

Enhanced therapeutic efficiency in tumors with AuNDs-assisted PPTT.Ultrasound B-mode imaging at the indicated treatment days shows that when tumors exposed to laser radiation and ultrasound simultaneously, the enhanced PPTT efficiency was observed in tumors loaded with AuNDs in compare to tumors loaded with AuMBs or without contrast agent loading.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837361&req=5

f7: Enhanced therapeutic efficiency in tumors with AuNDs-assisted PPTT.Ultrasound B-mode imaging at the indicated treatment days shows that when tumors exposed to laser radiation and ultrasound simultaneously, the enhanced PPTT efficiency was observed in tumors loaded with AuNDs in compare to tumors loaded with AuMBs or without contrast agent loading.
Mentions: The implanted tumor was monitored using B-mode imaging every 7 days during PPTT. The images in the top row of Fig. 7 show that AuNDs-treated tumors exhibited a larger scale of injury after PPTT for 14 days compared to the tumors without AuNDs treatment. According to the B-mode image of an AuNDs-treated tumor, such large-scale injury effectively caused the tumor tissue to contract and deform due to thermal denaturation of protein induced by PPTT-induced heating. One week later (on day 21), an obvious scar had formed on the AuNDs-treated tumor, which resulted in a severe imaging artifact appearance during the B-mode imaging. Although a scar that also formed in the tumor without AuNDs treatment generated a small ultrasound imaging artifact, that scar was smaller and it was clearly evident that not all of the tumor tissue had been successfully damaged. After applying PPTT to the implanted tumors for 1.5 months (day 42), the AuNDs-treated tumor was fully cured, whereas the tumor that had not received AuNDs treatment had relapsed and actually enlarged. The similar findings were also found in compared the AuNDs-treated tumor with AuMBs-treated tumor, which the AuNDs-treated tumor was fully cured, whereas the AuMBs-treated one was relapsed and enlarged after applying PPTT. These data demonstrate that treating a tumor with AuNDs followed by PPTT severely damages tumor tissue and thus successfully destroys the tumor, while a tumor that does not receive AuNDs treatment or treats with AuMBs displays comparatively minor damage that cannot destroy it.

Bottom Line: This study used nanodroplets to significantly enhance the effectiveness of sonoporation relative to using conventional microbubbles.Enhanced cavitation also leads to significant enhancement of the sonoporation effects.Our in vivo results show that nanodroplet-vaporization-assisted sonoporation can increase the treatment temperature by more than 10 °C above that achieved by microbubble-based sonoporation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei 106, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Sonoporation refers to the use of ultrasound and acoustic cavitation to temporarily enhance the permeability of cellular membranes so as to enhance the delivery efficiency of therapeutic agents into cells. Microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents are often used to facilitate these cavitation effects. This study used nanodroplets to significantly enhance the effectiveness of sonoporation relative to using conventional microbubbles. Significant enhancements were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo by using gold nanorods encapsulated in nanodroplets for implementing plasmonic photothermal therapy. Combined excitation by ultrasound and laser radiation is used to trigger the gold nanodroplets to induce a liquid-to-gas phase change, which induces cavitation effects that are three-to-fivefold stronger than when using conventional microbubbles. Enhanced cavitation also leads to significant enhancement of the sonoporation effects. Our in vivo results show that nanodroplet-vaporization-assisted sonoporation can increase the treatment temperature by more than 10 °C above that achieved by microbubble-based sonoporation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus